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EARLY UKRAINIAN

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Andreiv Choma

on 6 November 2013

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Transcript of EARLY UKRAINIAN

EARLY UKRAINIAN
IMMIGRATION IN BRAZIL
(1891-1920)

Andreiv Choma
Andreiv Choma - M.A. Student
andreiv@ualberta.ca
University of Alberta - 2013
designed by Péter Puklus for Prezi
Ukrainians in Brazil
1890 - Brazil
1891 - Paraná
Where in Paraná?
Iguassu Valley
Ukrainian community in Brazil
is made up of about 500,000
descendants
of Ukrainians who arrived in Brazil
in the late nineteenth and
early twentieth century.
In 1890, the Brazilian government launched
a large campaign to attract immigrants,
including promises to pay
costs related to travel and food.
The regimentation of immigrants was
entrusted to shipping companies,
who developed an intense
propaganda of emigration in the press,
in pamphlets and through
various agents throughout Europe
- Established in 1853
- The new railroad would cross the Paraná Province from south to north;
- Border problems with Santa Catarina
Why southern Brazil???

- Border problems;
- Weather;
- Railroad from RS to SP;

(1896 - Parana Archives)

- Arrived in Brazil in 1868;
- He conceived the idea of bringing Polish immigrants to Brazil;
- In 1890, he was sent to the Iguassu Valley;
- From 1890 to 1892, Saporski chose ports and sites,
projected roads and surveyed the colonies
of Eufrosina and Rio Claro;
- Rio Claro: 1371 lots of land, spread over 9 main lines and 18 vicinal lines

Sebastião Saporski
Rio Claro
In 1891, 30 Ukrainian families arrived in Rio Claro.
From 1891 to 1895, about 3,000 Ukrainians.
In 1895, about 700 families.
1891-1900
- Father Nikon Rozdolskey arrived in 1897
- Churches and schools in Colonia 5 (1897) and Serra do Tigre (1899-1900)

Teodoro Pototzkey, resident in Colony 5, recorded the events of the time in a letter to the Ukrainian newspaper Svoboda, in United States of America, in 1898:
“(...) our Reading club was founded on July 25, 1897. It is located next to the church in the house we built for our priest, Father Nikon Rozdolsky (...). A church brotherhood has been established for the colonists: that of St. Nykola for the men and of the Holy Sacraments for the women (…). Our church was blessed on the fifth Sunday of Great Lent in 1897 (…). The work took exactly 55 days to complete (…). Ours is the best of all Ruthenians colonies in Brazil and God has made this a very good year for us (…)”.

Ivan Paceviecz, arrived in Brazil in 1891, accompanied by his parents and two sisters, his memories were published in the newspaper Pratsia in 1951, :
“There was no church when we arrived (...). The first church was built in 1897. It was located a good distance away and so we would travel there by foot two or there times a year. The people began to built a church in Serra do Tigre in 1899. (…)”.

1900-1910
- About 18,550 Ukrainians arrived in Brazil during this period;
- After the death of Father Nikon, in 1906, Father Kyryllo Symkyv was sent to serve the region.
- Railway station near to the River Charqueada (1903).
- In late 1906, Ukrainians from Colony 3 constructed a Church in the area.
- This church became the seat of the first Ukrainian Greek-Catholic Parish in Brazil.
- Population slowly migrated closer to the station, giving rise to the present town of Mallet.
Documents
Marriages (1907-1911)

Baptisms (1896-1911)
110 Marriages (1907-1911)
About 200 families
Zolochiv - 20%
Sokal' - 18%
Zhovka - 11%
Ternopil - 7%
Bibrka - 7%
1910-1920
- Taras Shevchenko Ukrainian Society (1910);
- Development of Mallet;
- Libraries, schools.
- New Church
BIBLIOGRAPHY
BORUSZENKO, Oksana. Os Ucranianos. Curitiba-PR: FCC, 1995.
BURKO, Valdomiro N.. A Imigração Ucraniana no Brasil. Curitiba-PR, 1963.
HANEIKO, Valdomiro. Uma Centelha de Luz. Curitiba.
HEC, Nikolas. Para o Brasil. Prudentópolis: Tipografia Prudentópolis, 1981.
HORBATIUK, Paulo. Imigração Ucraniana no Paraná. Porto União-SC: Uniporto, 1989.
MORSKI, Jeffrey Picknicki.Under the Southern Cross: a collection of accounts and reminiscences about the Ukrainian immigration in Brazil, 1891-1914. Winnipeg: Watson & Dwyer, 2000.
PRICE, Paul. The Polish Immigrant in Brazil. Vanderbilt University, 1950
Svoboda (www.svoboda-news.com)

MAPS
Archives from Mallet Government
Genealogy of Halychyna (www.halgal.com)
Biblioteca Digital do Patrimonio Ibero Americano
Instituto de Terras Cartografia e Geociência do Paraná (http://www.itcg.pr.gov.br)
Ukrainian Cultural Heritage Village (http://tapor.ualberta.ca/heritagevillage/menu1.php)

PICTURES
Archives from Ukrainian Catholic Parish in Mallet
Basilio Kuracz (Mallet, PR)
Personal Archives
Archives from Mallet Government



Miguel Bakun
Mallet - 1909
Pedro Bakun (Sokal)
and Julianna Maksymowicz (Kamianka-Strumilova)
Full transcript