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Copy of Whoso List To Hunt

A presentation of the poem Whoso List To Hunt by Sir Thomas Wyatt
by

Chelsey Adams

on 9 October 2012

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Transcript of Copy of Whoso List To Hunt

Whoso List
To Hunt Literary Devices Main Idea Poem Sir Thomas Wyatt Background of Whoso List To Hunt and their meaning Whoso list to hunt, I know where is an hind,
But as for me, alas, I may no more.
The vain travail hath wearied me so sore
I am of them that furthest come behind.
Yet may I by no means my wearied mind
Draw from the deer, but as she fleeth afore,
Fainting I follow. I leave off therefore,
Since in a net I seek to hold the wind.

Who list her hunt, I put him out of doubt,
As well as I, may spend his time in vain.
And graven with diamonds in letters plain
There is written her fair neck round about,
"Noli me tangere, for Caesar's I am,
And wild for to hold, though I seem tame." Whoso List: whoever desires
Hind: femaile deer
Vain Travail: futile labor
"Noil Me Tangere": "touch me not" HE TALKS ABOUT HOW HE KNOWS WHERE THE
FEMALE DEER/FEMALE IS BUT HE REFUSES TO GO WYATT KNOWS THAT IF HE GETS WITH THE GIRL HE WILL GET IN TROUBLE WITH THE KING. HE KNOWS THAT HE CANT TOUCH THE GIRL Metaphor- the "hind" or "deer" -represents a female -the author is in love with the deer
Alliteration- the words 'hunt' and 'hind' -used to show the irony in looking for a female deer, falling in love, and puts an emphasis on not being able to pursue that feeling. HE IS THINKING ABOUT THE GIRL BUT KNOWS
HE CANT HAVE HER SO HES NOT EVEN GOING TO TRY
TO GO AFTER HER Sir Thomas Wyatt has fallen in love with Anne Boleyn, although she is the property of Henry VIII. He ignores this and pushes forward. She feels the same towards him but knows that she is incapable of expressing this because she is in a relationship. Wyatt then gives up and allows whoever may desire to have her. Tone The tone is depressing because there is a guy(Sir Thomas Wyatt who loves this girl(Anne) and she is already in love with the king, the person Wyatt is working for. THE GUY KNOWS THAT THE KING HAS
DONE BOUGHT ANNE THINGS. HE DESCRIBES
HOW THE NECKLACE LOOKS ON THE HIND Lines 1-4=
I know where there is a
beautiful woman, but I will
have nothing to do
with catching her
Lines 5-8=
Yet as hard as I try,
I am drawn to her
like a moth to a flame
as bright as the sun.
For I seek to do the impossible
and win her love
Lines 9-12=
you may chase her as I did,
but a fair warning,
you will fail, as I did.
Lines 13-14=
She belongs to Caesar
and she doesn’t want anyone but him.
She is wild, I am calm,
follow my word. Connection The way Maroon 5 is connected to the poem is he talks about how he loves a girl and he don't want to say goodbye. Maroon talks about how he loves this girl and so does she love him. he talk about how he wants to hold the girl.
Maroon 5 originally wrote this song about a girl Adam was in love with and they(Adam and the Jane) were having a hard time. There is this guy(Sir Thomas Wyatt) who works for the king and is in love with this girl and the girl is in love with Sir Thomas Wyatt too but knows she already with the king. The girl tries to tempt Wyatt to kiss her but he doesn't. He know he cant have the girl Whoso list to hunt, I know where is an hind,
But as for me, alas, I may no more.
The vain travail hath wearied me so sore
I am of them that furthest come behind. Yet may I by no means my wearied mind
Draw from the deer, but as she fleeth afore,
Fainting I follow. I leave off therefore,
Since in a net I seek to hold the wind. Who list her hunt, I put him out of doubt,
As well as I, may spend his time in vain.
And graven with diamonds in letters plain
There is written her fair neck round about, "Noli me tangere, for Caesar's I am,
And wild for to hold, though I seem tame." By: Chelsey Adams
Ryan Accord
James Stroud pg.272
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