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Higher Product Design

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by

Jack Stirling

on 12 February 2014

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Transcript of Higher Product Design

Higher
Product Design

Rapid Prototyping
Design Factors
> Safety
> Function
> Performance
> Aesthetics
> Ease of use
> Durability
> Maintenance
> Ergonomics
> Value for money
Product analysis
Aesthetics
Form
Colour
Proportion
Scale
Safety
Function
Performance
Ease of use
Durability
Maintenance
Ergonomics
Value for money
texture
Materials and manufacture

Injection moulding
compression moulding
extrusion
thermoforming
blow moulding
rotational moulding
vacuum forming
Plastic processes
Injection moulding
Benefits- if mass produced its inexpensive
- quick process
- quality control is easy

Features- spruce marks
- draw angles
- split line
- injection point
- ejector pin marks
- flash
- webs and bosses
Disadvantages - expensive to start
- may leave flash
Extrusion
Features - smooth-walled long sections
with uniform thickness
- line texturisation
Materials - polythene
- PVC
- polypropeline
Benifits - complex irregular profiles
are produced
- quick process to do
- economies of scale
Drawbacks - high set up cost
- maintenance
Existing products - inexpensive
electonic products
Materials - ABS
- polypropylene
vacuum forming
Features - sheet material is normally used
- any patterns or textures are
transferred
- pips
- thinning on sides
- tapers are quite pronounced
Materials - polythene
- PVC
- high density polystyrene
- ABS
- acrylic
Benifits - not time consuming
- low cost
- inexpensive materials
Drawbacks - bubbles may rise due to absorbed moisture expanding
- webbing can also occur id overheated or the mould id too close
Metal processes
Press forming
Press forming
Materials - Sheet materials
- various steels
- aluminium alloys
- brass
- copper
Features - sudden directional changes
- sharp bends and deep draws
- flanges
- ribs
- piercing
uses - pans
- kettles
- stainless steel kitchen sinks
- car bodies
- aircraft panels
description - squeezing sheet metal between
two matched metal moulds
Identify and justify aspects
strategy - how exactly will you find out
- how will it be shown
Results of tests
conclusion
Aesthetics
Function
Durability
Environment
Materials
Fused Deposition modeling
This process is also known as 3D printing
Laminated Object Manufacture
Selective Laser Sintering
Stereolithography
Inexpensive but slow
paper models can be worked
less accurate
larger models
cannot do many tests due to materials
9 topics
The design
process

Researching
Information

Idea
generation
techniques
Designing
for people

Communicating
ideas
Factors that
influence
design decisions
Manufacturing
systems
Manufacturing
Processes
Materials
Morphological analysis
Transfer
Analogy
Lateral thinking
Though showers
Mind maps
lifestyle boards
mood boards
Target market
Market research
Researching information
Marketing or selling
Identifying needs, wants and problems
Open and closed design briefs
The design specification (technical, performance market)
Members of a typical design team
Design development considerations
Product planning and product strategy
Product life
Evaluation
A typical model fr the design process
Analysis
Synthesis
Aesthetics
Ergonomics
Defining the market
Benefits of product design
Fashion, style and fads
Market trends
Needs and wants
Safety
Models
Prototypes
Systems diagrams
CAD
Types of drawings and their uses
Rapid prototyping
The design brief
Primary and secondary functions
Specifications
Market research
Fashion and style
Fitness for purpose
Planned obsolescence
Redundancy
Technological opportunity
Miniaturisation
Ergonomics
Environmental considerations
Consumer demands
Social expectations, social responsibilities and social behaviour
Market opportunity, niche marketing
Product life
Research and development
product testing
Safety and legislation
Designing for manufacture
Choosing a material
The cost of production
Economic considerations, costs
Intellectual property
The cost of production
One off production
Batch production
Mass production
Line production
cell production
Rapid prototyping
Just in time production
Sequential engineering
Concurrent engineering
CAD/CAM and CNC machining
Automation
Meachanisation
Injection moulding
Extrusion
Rotational moulding
Vacuum forming
Blow moulding
Laminating
Compression moulding
Metal turning
Milling metal
Die-casting
Press forming
Piercing and blanking
Joining metal
Sand casting
Forging and Drop forging
Finishing metal
Wood turning
Routing
Spindle moulding
Laminating
Jointing
Polythene
Polyvinyl
Polystyrene
Nylon
Acrylic
ABS
Polypropylene
Melamine formaldehyde
GRP
Carbon fibre plastics
Elastomers
Mild steel
Stainless steel
High carbon steel
Cast iron
Brass
Bronze
Aluminium
Duralumin
Copper
Tin
Lead
Zinc
Beech
Oak
Ash
Mahogany
Teak
Balsa wood
Walnut
Scots pine
Red cedar
Parana pine
Spruce
Plywood
Medium density fibreboard
Blockboard
Chipboard
Hardboard
Veneer
Additive manufacturing, or 3D printing, is the process of turning digital designs into three-dimensional objects. It is a convenient and affordable way to make prototypes as well as finished products, making it popular with businesses, hobbyists and inventors.

One of the technologies used by today's 3D printers is called selective laser sintering (SLS). During SLS, tiny particles of plastic, ceramic or glass are fused together by heat from a high-power laser to form a solid, three-dimensional object.

Stereolithography, also known as 3-D layering or 3-D printing, allows you to create solid, plastic, three-dimensional (3-D) objects from CAD drawings in a matter of hours. Whether you are a mechanical engineer wanting to verify the fit of a part or an inventor looking to create a plastic prototype of an invention, stereolithography gives you a fast, easy way to turn CAD drawings into real objects.

3-D printing is a very good example of the age we live in. In the past, it could conceivably take months to prototype a part -- today you can do it hours.
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