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Linear Perspective: one, two, three.

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by

Matthew Kimmel

on 14 October 2014

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Transcript of Linear Perspective: one, two, three.

Perspective
1 Point
2 Point
3 Point
Although perspective was first analyzed by the architect Filippo Brunelleschi (1377-1446), the central vanishing point appears to have been first used in 1423 by Masolino da Panicale (1383-c. 1440).
Horizontal line
: a line that goes left to right, it is parallel to the horizon line.
Vertical line:
a line that goes up and down, it is perpendicular to the horizon line
Horizon Line:
represents the separation between the earth and sky.
Vanishing Point:
Spot on the Horizon Line to which all objects go towards.
Orthogonal line:
lines that create the sides of an object in one point perspective, these lines are drawn to the vanishing point.
Here's how it works:
Does this exhibit proper perspective?
Does this exhibit proper perspective?
Do the columns get shorter?
See how the shapes get smaller as they trail off into the distance? We call that DIMINISHING SIZE.
See how the shapes get lighter as they trail off into the distance? We call that ATMOSPHERIC PERSPECTIVE.
See how the shapes lose clarity as they trail off into the distance? We call that DIMINISHING DETAIL.
Atmospheric Perspective:
Objects get lighter as they trail off into the distance.
Does the artist understand perspective?
Too easy?
Give yourself a challenge.
Full transcript