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Textile Industry in the Industrial Revolution

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Margaret Schnabel

on 26 February 2013

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Transcript of Textile Industry in the Industrial Revolution

The Beginning of the Industrial Revolution Working Conditions and Child Labor Textile Industry Today Industrial
Revolution Spinning Flying Shuttle John Kat (1733)

Lever - "fly"

Shorter time Industrial Start of the Revolution • Able to make more things easier because of the Industrial Revolution.

• Easier work.

• Machines helping.

• Better industry. Results -Combed out seeds
-Crank
-Fibers pulled through Cotton Gin (fill in) Cotton gin (fill in) Power Loom -Need money (families)

-Tired after long work day

-Cheated into low/no pay Child Labor - Unable to Revolt CHILD LABOR TODAY - Clothing
- Cheap
- Efficient How the Textile Industry has affected us Child Labor Revolution Resources Textile Industry Before the Revolution Inventions Water Frame Bibliography Spinning Mule Jenny http://www.google.com/search?client=safari&rls=en&q=spinning+mule 1753 - Angry textile workers James Hargreaves
Multiple spindles
1764 • Sinclair, Upton. The Jungle. New York: Penguin Classics, 1985. 204-05. Print.
• "A New Workforce During the Industrial Revolution." Child labor in factories. N.p., 2002. Web. 5 Feb. 2013. <http://www2.needham.k12.ma.us/nhs/cur/Baker_00/2002_p7/ak_p7/childlabor.html>.

• Bellis, Mary. "Industrial Revolution - Textile Industry and Textile Machinery." About.com. N.p., n.d. Web. 6 Feb. 2013. <http://inventors.about.com/library/inventors/blindustrialrevolutiontextiles.htm>.

• Mack, Pamela E. "Textiles and the early British Industrial Revolution." Clemson.edu. N.p., 13 Sept. 2012. Web. 6 Feb. 2013. <http://www.clemson.edu/caah/history/FacultyPages/PamMack/lec122sts/hobsbawm3.html>

• "Sweatshops and Strikes before 1911." Cornell University.edu. N.p., n.d. Web. 6 Feb. 2013. <http://www.ilr.cornell.edu/trianglefire/story/sweatshopsStrikes.html>.

• "Sweatshops and Strikes before 1911." Cornell University.edu. N.p., n.d. Web. 6 Feb. 2013. <http://www.ilr.cornell.edu/trianglefire/story/sweatshopsStrikes.html>.

• Child Spinners. Web. 7 Feb. 2013. <http://virtual.clemson.edu/caah/history/FacultyPages/PamMack/lec323/millintro.html>.

• Hackett, Lewis. "The Industrial Revolution - Why the Revolution Began in England." History World.org. N.p., 1992. Web. 8 Feb. 2013. <http://history-world.org/Industrial%20Intro.htm>.

• "New Machines and the Factory System." Industrial Revolution Reference Library. Ed. James L. Outman, Matthew May, and Elisabeth M. Outman. Vol. 1: Almanac. Detroit: UXL, 2003. 63-82. Gale World History In Context. Web. 8 Feb. 2013.

• Industrial Revolution. History Channel, n.d. Web. 5 Feb. 2013. <http://www.history.com/topics/industrial-revolution>.

• Industrial Revolution. History Channel, n.d. Web. 5 Feb. 2013. <http://www.history.com/topics/industrial-revolution>.

• Industrial Revolution. History Channel, n.d. Web. 5 Feb. 2013. <http://www.history.com/topics/industrial-revolution>.

• Industrial Revolution. History Channel, n.d. Web. 5 Feb. 2013. <http://www.history.com/topics/industrial-revolution>.

• Industrial Revolution. History Channel, n.d. Web. 5 Feb. 2013. <http://www.history.com/topics/industrial-revolution>.

• Keys, David. "Revealed: Industrial Revolution Was Powered by Child Slaves." The Independent. 02 Aug 2010: 18. SIRS Issues Researcher. Web.
06 Feb 2013.

• Chebium, Raju. "Textiles Called America's Oldest Industry." Gannett News Service. 11 Jul 2002: n.p. SIRS Renaissance. Web. 07 Feb 2013.

• "Leeds Woollen Workers Petition, 1786." Fordham University. Internet History Sourcebook, 1998. Web. 8 Feb. 2013.

• "The Water (Spinning) Frame ." Think Quest: Library. N.p., n.d. Web. 8 Feb. 2013.

• "Spinning Mule." Spartacus Educational. N.p., n.d. Web. 8 Feb. 2013.
"The Spinning Mule (1779)." Think Quest: Library. N.p., n.d. Web. 8 Feb. 2013.

• "The Power Loom (1779)." Thinkquest: Library. N.p., n.d. Web. 8 Feb. 2013. Jacquard loom

-1804 Power Loom

Cartwright
1779 Synthetic dye

-1856
-William Perkins Power loom -98% LA garment factories (unsafe conditions)

-67% LA and 63% NY factories (minimum wage)

-218 million children working between 5-17yrs Impact of Textile industry - Spurred on Revolution
- Cheap, fast, efficient • Started in 18th-19th centuries. • Invented by Catwrite in 1779.

• Became more popular in 1790s.

• Replaced human weavers. • Spread around the world. Made in 1775. Created in 1769 Worker's Petition • 1000's of workers outraged

• Replaced by machines. Role of Child Labor -Beginning of Child Labor

-Cheap pay --> better factory Working Conditions of Factories -Cotton fluff (bad air)

-Dangerous machinery

-No protection

-Long hours

-Low pay Triangle Shirtwaist Fire -March 25, 1911

-Fire in the top floors of the Triangle Waist Company

-146 of the 500 employees died Why did it start in England?

-New technology
-Wealth
-Raw materials
-Moving into city -> cheap labor
-Increased demand
-"Laissez-faire" <(°p) http://0.tqn.com/d/inventors/1/0/g/T/water_frame_2.jpg THANK YOU FOR LISTENING THANK YOU FOR LISTENING
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