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Learner Centred Instruction

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Lucy Rodrigues

on 16 March 2014

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Transcript of Learner Centred Instruction

Agenda
What is a Learner-Centered Approach
By utilizing a learner centered approach:

Students are engaged in their learning
Students feel motivated to learn
Learners are involved in discussions and activities
Learners are empowered and have a clear understanding of what is a learner centered instruction

Learner-centered instruction allows for:
Learners take part in setting goals and objectives
There is a concern about learners’ needs, goals, likes, dislikes, feelings and values
Learners take much of the responsibility for their own learning
Learners are actively involved in shaping how they learn that is, students co-construct knowledge rather than just receive it
There is an abundance of brainstorming activities, pair work and small group work
The teacher is seen as a facilitator of learning rather than an instructor who spoon feeds learners with knowledge
(Shehadeh, 2012, p.5).

Affective Domain
Key Features of the Learner Centered Approach
There are four characteristics of learner-centered instruction which are that “learners:
Have different learning styles
Posses different working styles
Learn in different ways depending on learning resource/tools
Construct knowledge in different ways”
(Burns et al., 2014, p. 19).

This type of instructional method is “characterized by the following traits:
Positive interdependence: team members need one another to complete their task. They cannot complete the activity alone
Individual accountability: each team member is responsible for a certain part of the task or fulfills a certain role. If someone is not doing his/her job, true collaboration is absent
Social skills: team members must learn to handle conflict, argue constructively, and disagree without being disagreeable, etc.
Face-to-face interaction: team member physically work together, in a common space, to complete their task
Group processing: team member help one another understand how learning occurred and how each team member contributed to completion of the overall product. Reflecting on learning is critical to real learning” (Burns et al., 2014, p. 19-20).


By: Lucy Rodrigues
Learner Centered Instruction
“learner is central to all aspects of the learning and teaching process” (Shehadeh, 2012, p.5)

“learners are unique individuals who have particular and distinct ways of receiving and assimilating information, processing information, interacting with resources, and constructing knowledge” (Burns et al., 2014, p. 19).

It is the customization of learning by looking at student uniqueness

This type of instruction is geared to motivating learners

Assists students taking on more responsibility for directing their own learning

"learner-centered teaching is as much a way of being, a disposition, as it is doing one thing or another (Reigeluth & Carr-Chellman, p 16)
What is the Learner-Centered approach
Key Features
Intended Learning Goals
Affective Domain and the Learner-Centered Approach
Theories and the Learner-Centered Approach
Implementation
Situational Constraints
Learner-Centered Approach and Adult Learning
Resources
Learning Goals
Learner Centered
Learner Centered Approach and Theory
Domain Theory for Instruction: Mapping Attainments to Enable Learner-Centered Education:
Information-age paradigm of education will be learner centered - customization
allows for tracking of individual learners' attained knowledge and skills
Maps of progress within learning domain - will display how each individual is progressing along each mapped learning pathway
the interpretive framework will be user centered to enable communication among learners and teachers
A mapped learning domain guides learning progress to identify what has been accomplished and what is appropriate to learn next
Example tool is quantitative domain mapping
Reigeluth & Carr-Chellman, 2009, pg 330
Theoretical information may get missed
Students may not take responsibility for learner or may become unmotivated in following through with commitments
This may be time consuming and require a greater investment from the instructor
Not suitable for all situations e.g. simple tasks
May lack structure or discipline in comparison to traditional methods

Learners take much of the responsibility for their own learning
Learners are actively involved and engaged
There is an abundance of brainstorming activities, pair work and small group work
The teacher is seen as a facilitator of learning rather than an instructor
The teacher is seen as a coach

Successful Implementation
According to D.M. Dirkx (2001):
Emotions are important in adult education because they can either impede or motivate learning (pg 67)
Journal writing, literature, poetry, art, movies, story-telling, dance, and ritual are specific methods that can be used to help foster the life of the image in our relationships with adult learners (pg 70)
emotional and affective dimensions of learning as also contributing to a positive educational experience (pg 67)
In recalling incidents of memorable learning, participants in the author’s teaching-strategies course typically describe experiences in which there was a strong, positive, emotional, or affective dimension, such as a supportive climate, a caring teacher who listens to us as individuals, a teacher who respects us as persons, or a teacher who involves the whole person in the learning experience (pg 67)
Learner Centered Approach and Adult Learning
This type of instructional method is “characterized by the following traits:
Positive interdependence: team members need one another to complete their task. They cannot complete the activity alone
Individual accountability: each team member is responsible for a certain part of the task or fulfills a certain role. If someone is not doing his/her job, true collaboration is absent
Social skills: team members must learn to handle conflict, argue constructively, and disagree without being disagreeable, etc.
Face-to-face interaction: team member physically work together, in a common space, to complete their task
Group processing: team member help one another understand how learning occurred and how each team member contributed to completion of the overall product. Reflecting on learning is critical to real learning” (Burns et al., 2014, p. 19-20).

Students achieve the highest outcome from session
Students are motivated and engaged in learner
The teacher and student relationship is one of a coach, built on support, respect and trust
Retention and ownership for learning increases
Individualized plans creates organization and shows progression of learning
References
Burns, G., Pierson, X., & Reddy, J. (2014). Working Together: How Teachers Teach and Students Learn in Collaborative Learning Environments. International Journal of Instruction, 7(1), 17-32.

Dirkx, D.M. (2001). The power of feelings: emotion, imagination, and the construction of
meaning in adult learning. New Directions for Adult and Continuing Education, 89,
63-72.

Reigeluth, C.M., Carr-Chellman, A.A. (Eds.). (2009). Instructional-Design Theories and Models: Building a Common Knowledge Base. New York: Routledge

Shehadeh, Ali. (2012). Learner-Centered Instruction in the ELT Classroom: What, Why and
How? TESOL Arabia Perspectives, 19 (3), 5-13.

Learner Centered Activity

At the beginning of the lesson have learners write out three objectives that they would like achieved from the session (if you want to get creative – have the learners draw objectives on flip chart)

At midpoint of the session have learners – discuss any objectives that have been met or ask them to answer the following three questions:
1. I would like to learn more of…
2. I would like to learn less of…
3. Areas of learning I need to further look into…
The facilitator/teacher can use this as a guide to ensure students are maximizing their learning and taking responsibility that their needs are being met

At the end of the lesson have learner review their objectives and ensure if their needs were not met in the session what are the next steps in achieving the outcomes

Main Process
Students are encouraged to develop a learning plan or personal expectations/outcomes
Teachers reviews plans to ensure student is on the learning path and will achieve outcomes
Less formal process involves check-ins with students throughout lesson
Students are engaged in activities and discussions
Teacher is seen as a coach and learner is leading their experience
Domain Theory for Instruction: Mapping Attainments to Enable Learner-Centered Education:
Information-age paradigm of education will be learner centered - customization
allows for tracking of individual learners' attained knowledge and skills
Maps of progress within learning domain - will display how each individual is progressing along each mapped learning pathway
Interpretive framework will be user centered to enable communication among learners and teachers
Mapped learning domain guides learning progress to identify what has been accomplished and what is appropriate to learn next
Example tool is quantitative domain mapping
Reigeluth & Carr-Chellman, 2009, pg 330
Situational Constraints
Full transcript