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Why do we Remember the Alamo?

Revolution: My Final Project
by

Kira Dionne

on 25 April 2013

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Transcript of Why do we Remember the Alamo?

Why do we
'Remember the Alamo' ? What is the Alamo? 'Remember the Alamo!' was always used as a battle cry, you could hear it echoing the battlefields before each battle commenced. So why do people say that? Well, whenever people think of the Alamo, they think of the courage all of those men showed. Even though they knew they had no chance of winning, they still stood their ground, showing immense courage and loyalty to what they were fighting for. When people say 'Remember the Alamo', it is basically saying, be strong, and have courage, just like all of those men did back then. So why do we
remember the Alamo? What happened there? From February 23 - March 6th, 1836, the Alamo served as a fort for the Texan army in the Texas Revolution. After a 13 day siege, Mexican troops (under the orders of President General Antonio López de Santa Anna) launched an assault on the Alamo Mission. In the battle, the Texan army was outnumbered 90 to 1. The 18,000 troops of Mexicans demolished the 200 Texans. Why was it so important? The Battle of the Alamo was very important to all of the Texans because it showed courage. Even though the Texan Army at the fort knew they were greatly outnumbered and really did not stand a chance, they still fought. Half of the men went and made a border around the fort, delaying them from getting inside. They did this without second thought, making it so the men inside could prepare more weapons and try to call for help. All of the men who were at the Alamo those days died. They risked their lives to win the war. Today the Alamo is a historic structure in Texas. Since it was not greatly damaged in the battles, visitors can go and basically tour it, looking through all the rooms and hallways that were there during the 17th century. It is a very popular tourist attraction, telling lots about the building's past. Sources 1) http://www.thealamo.org/visitors/sanantonio.php 2) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_the_Alamo 3) http://history.howstuffworks.com/history-vs-myth/remember-the-alamo.htm The Alamo Today The Alamo is a big stone monument in San Antonio, Texas. From that, it doesn't sound like much but it was the sight of a terrible battle in the Texas Revolution. The Alamo was built to be a Catholic mission church, there to convert Mesoamerican Indians to the Catholic religion, but ended up being a fort for the Texans in the Texas Revolution. {Source 3} {Source 2} {All Sources} {All Sources} What else did the Alamo do? The Alamo served as a fort in the Texan Revolution but that wasn't the only time it was used. For about 300 years The Alamo was used as a military base for the Texan Army and other, smaller military's. {All Sources}
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