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Climate

hunterseijas
by

thomas seijas

on 21 April 2010

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Transcript of Climate

Double click anywhere & add an idea climate Temperature is a measure of the average energy of motion, or kinetic energy, of particles in matter. When particles of matter, whether in solids, liquids, gases, or elementary plasmas, move faster or have greater mass, they carry more kinetic energy, and the material appears warmer than a material with slower or less massive particles. In meteorology, precipitation (also known as one of the classes of hydrometeors, which are atmospheric water phenomena) is any product of the condensation of atmospheric water vapor that is pulled down by gravity and deposited on the Earth's surface. gives the location of a place on Earth (or other planetary body) north or south of the equator. Lines of Latitude are the imaginary horizontal lines shown running east-to-west (or west to east) on maps (particularly so in the Mercator projection) that run either north or south of the equator. Technically, latitude is an angular measurement in degrees (marked with °) ranging from 0° at the equator (low latitude) to 90° at the poles (90° N or +90° for the North Pole and 90° S or −90° for the South Pole). The latitude is approximately the angle between straight up at the surface (the zenith) and the sun at an equinox. The complementary angle of a latitude is called the colatitude.
radiant light and heat from the sun, has been harnessed by humans since ancient times using a range of ever-evolving technologies. Solar radiation, along with secondary solar-powered resources such as wind and wave power, hydroelectricity and biomass, account for most of the available renewable energy on earth. Only a minuscule fraction of the available solar energy is used.
flow of gases on a large scale. On Earth, wind consists of the bulk movement of air. In outer space, solar wind is the movement of gases or charged particles from the sun through space, while planetary wind is the outgassing of light chemical elements from a planet's atmosphere into space. Winds are commonly classified by their spatial scale, their speed, the types of forces that cause them, the regions in which they occur, and their effect. Latitude Solar Energy Precipitation Temperature Global Wind Patterns Hunter Seijas Block.1 Citrus High School ocean current a continuous, directed movement of ocean water generated by the forces acting upon this mean flow, such as breaking waves, wind, Coriolis force, temperature and salinity differences and tides caused by the gravitational pull of the Moon and the Sun. Depth contours, shoreline configurations and interaction with other currents influence a current's direction and strength.
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