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Mixed-Woods Plains

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Vanluke Balatbat

on 16 April 2010

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Transcript of Mixed-Woods Plains

Double click anywhere & add an idea Mixedwood Plains is not Plain :P
Landforms
The Mixedwood Plains is the furthest south ecozone in Canada. Here you would find plains and hills. The landforms were shaped by glaciers during the Ice Age. Underneath the Mixedwood Plains are mesozoic and paleozoic sedimentary rock. The Mixedwood Plains are well supplied in freshwater due to the Great Lakes and St. Lawrence River.
Climate Vegetation
In the Mixedwood Plains you find all four seasons. Winter season would usually be shorter then the Summer. The average temperature of winter would be -7C, the summer average temperature would be about 20°C. You would get 720-1000 mm of precipitation annually. The Great Lakes and St. Lawrence River have a reasonable effect towards the climate in this ecozone.
This ecozone contain many mixtures of deciduous forest which contains sugar maple, red oak, and basswood and coniferous forest would have white pine, eastern hemlock, and red pine. It is possible to grow crops in the Mixed Wood Plains, since there are rich soil in the ecozone, but due to the building of cities most land would had taken.
Wildlife
In this ecozone you won't find bears or deers due to the increase of people living in the Mixedwood Plains. You would commonly find racoons, skunks, squirrels, groundhog, and rabbits. Ecological Footprint

The ecological footprint made by humans on this ecozone greatly affects vegetation, wildlife, climate, and landforms. The reason being is construction; vegetation, wildlife, climate, and the landform of this area are affected because...

Air and water polluted by cars and buildings such as power plants
Buildings, such as power plants, produce hazardous waste
The landform in an area of this ecozone is changed to fit the building preferences
Habitants are destroyed leaving animals homeless
Global Warming
Forestry
Too much urbanization

The population of the Mixed Wood Plains is 93 percent of Ontario and Ontario’s population is 38 percent of the Canadian total. So the negative effect that humans bring to Mixed Wood Plains is enormous.
Humans can’t really reduce much because of the huge population of the Mixed Wood Plains and also the population grows daily. Homes, commercial buildings, power plants, hydro facilities, and etc will be built to support the growing population. What people can do to help out in lessening the negative effects is to “go green” and use less of our cars and try to use public transit, bicycle, recycle and etc. Those are just the cons but the pros are that the Mixed wood Plains contain large cities like Toronto and Montreal. Toronto has the CN Tower and is a multicultural city. The Mixed wood Plains area is a great place in the summer, even in the winter lots of activities to do since the urban areas are great and the natural areas are fantastic. To know more about Cities within Mixed wood Plains and Canada visit
http://www.canadiantravelguide.net/ http://s257.photobucket.com/albums/hh209/retrobotic/design.jpg

http://www.canadiangeographic.ca/atlas/themes.aspx?
id=mixedwood&sub=mixedwood_basics_ecozones&lang=En

http://ecozones.ca/english/zone/MixedwoodPlains/land.html

http://www.arbopals.com/images/arbopedia/deciduous1.jpg

http://image.absoluteastronomy.com/images/encyclopediaimages/r/ro/rouge_river_at_kirkh
ams_road_toronto.jpg

http://cache.backpackinglight.com/backpackinglight/user_uploads/1244751025_13779.jpg

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/a/a6/Winter_forest.jpg

http://www.eco.on.ca/eng/images/imagepka.jpg

http://cache.boston.com/universal/site_graphics/blogs/bigpicture/efa_10_06/20_t.jpg

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3178/2936878057_75dd994b00.jpg

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/7/70/Spring_forest,_near_Planinsko_polje.j
pg

http://www.ec.gc.ca/indicateurs-indicators/default.asp?lang=en&n=32E1E173-1

http://wvartist.files.wordpress.com/2009/08/dsc_0006.jpg

http://api.ning.com/files/w8-
fykZLS95gv6PJHByA2oOE8rt69ebAWT1L9p0J7mplNJ7jFubU2XQZsfdiyIrq3Z0HjtVzGQOAL
sge5DJWC2Q6sNGPZ4wB/Waterpollution.jpg

http://dos.cornell.edu/dos/cms/greek/info_for_students/images/logo_green.gif

http://www.voga.org/Bike_Touring.jpg

http://casacara.files.wordpress.com/2009/08/2006_10_05_raccoon.jpg

http://magazine.canadiangeographic.ca/atlas/images/image20.jpg

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/1/10/Douglas_Squirrel_Lake_Forest_CA.jp
g

http://static.panoramio.com/photos/original/5196939.jpg

http://www.destination360.com/north-america/canada/images/s/canada-cn-tower.jpg
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