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John Ford in comparison to William Shakespeare

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jasmine weadd

on 11 December 2013

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Transcript of John Ford in comparison to William Shakespeare

John Ford in comparison to William Shakespeare


Prior to the start of his career as a playwright, Ford wrote other non-dramatic literary works the long religious poem
-Christ's Bloody Sweat (1613)
-two prose essays published as pamphlets, The Golden Mean (1613) & A Line of Life (1620)
After 1620 he began active dramatic writing, first as a collaborator with more experienced playwrights — primarily Thomas Dekker, but also John Webster and William Rowley —& by the later 1620s as a solo artist.
Ford is best known for the tragedy ‘Tis Pity She’s A Whore (1633), a family drama with a plot line of incest. The play's title has often been changed in new productions, sometimes being referred to as simply Giovanni and Annabella — the play's leading, incestuous brother-and-sister characters; in a nineteenth-century work it is coyly called The Brother and Sister.[11] Shocking as the play is, it is still widely regarded as a classic piece of English drama.
He was a major playwright during the reign of Charles I. His plays deal with conflicts between individual passion and conscience and the laws and morals of society at large; Ford had a strong interest in abnormal psychology that is expressed through his dramas. His plays often show the influence of Robert Burton's The Anatomy of Melancholy. While virtually nothing is known of Ford's personal life, one reference suggests that Ford's interest in melancholia may have been more than merely intellectual. The volume Choice Drollery(1656) asserts that
Deep in a dump alone John Ford was gat,With folded arms and melancholy hat.[12]

GENERATION AFTER SHAKESPEARE


The playwright John Ford was a member of the next generation after Shakespeare. Born thirty years after Shakespeare, he wrote this play around 1630. This was a time of massive social upheaval, in which many of the old assumptions about family, political authority, and religious belief were in question. The parliamentary system of government was temporarily in abeyance, as Charles I sought to govern without parliament. By 1642, the country descended into the horrors of civil war, in which unprecedented violence and destruction turned families into warring camps, completed the obliteration of the church ornaments of the middle ages (already compromised by the religious reformation a hundred years earlier), and culminated in the execution of the King and the introduction of a republican form of government. The discussions in the Army Council in 1647-49 were the most radical debates over systems of government ever to occur in England, and ideas raised then inspired much of the constitutional debate in post-revolutionary America.


Similarities

Both playwrights
Both poets
Both of English descendant
Both inferior dramatists
Ford could not avoid comparison with Shakespeare, his illustrious predecessor. In most cases, critics harshly judged Ford as an inferior dramatist who rewrote many of Shakespeare's plays.



Both playwrights
Both poets
Both of English descendant
Both inferior dramatists
Ford could not avoid comparison with Shakespeare, his illustrious predecessor. In most cases, critics harshly judged Ford as an inferior dramatist who rewrote many of Shakespeare's plays.



SIMILARITIES

The playwright John Ford was a member of the next generation after Shakespeare. Born thirty years after Shakespeare, he wrote this play around 1630. This was a time of massive social upheaval, in which many of the old assumptions about family, political authority, and religious belief were in question. The parliamentary system of government was temporarily in abeyance, as Charles I sought to govern without parliament. By 1642, the country descended into the horrors of civil war, in which unprecedented violence and destruction turned families into warring camps, completed the obliteration of the church ornaments of the middle ages (already compromised by the religious reformation a hundred years earlier), and culminated in the execution of the King and the introduction of a republican form of government. The discussions in the Army Council in 1647-49 were the most radical debates over systems of government ever to occur in England, and ideas raised then inspired much of the constitutional debate in post-revolutionary America.


GENERATION AFTER SHAKESPEARE

It was not until 1606 that Ford wrote his first works for publication. In the spring of that year he was expelled from Middle Temple, due to his financial problems, and Fame's Memorial and Honour Triumphant soon followed. Both works are clear bids for patronage : Fame's Memorial is an elegy of 1169 lines on the recently deceased Charles Blount, 1st Earl of Devonshire, while Honour Triumphant is a prose pamphlet, a verbal fantasia written in connection with the jousts planned for the summer 1606 visit of King Christian IV of Denmark. It is unknown whether either of these brought any financial remuneration to Ford; yet by June 1608 he had enough money to be readmitted to the Middle Temple.


Background (Continued)

 He was baptized at Ilsington in Devonshire, April 17, 1586
Entered Exeter College, Oxford, in March, 1601 and was admitted to the Middle Temple in November 1602.
Ford left home to study in London, although more specific details are unclear a sixteen-year-old John Ford of Devon was admitted to Exeter College in Oxford on 26 March 1601, but this was when the dramatist had not yet reached his sixteenth birthday. He joined an institution that was a prestigious law school but also a centre of literary and dramatic activity the Middle Temple. A prominent junior member in 1601 was the playwright John Marston (It is unknown whether Ford ever actually studied law while a resident of the Middle Temple, or whether he was strictly a gentleman boarder, which was a common arrangement at the time).
He first appeared in print with Fame's Memorial (1606), a long elegy on the death of the Earl of Devonshire, and he published other occasional pieces before he finally committed himself to a dramatic career.

Background Info

Prior to the start of his career as a playwright, Ford wrote other non-dramatic literary works the long religious poem 
-Christ's Bloody Sweat (1613)
-two prose essays published as pamphlets, The Golden Mean (1613) & A Line of Life (1620)
After 1620 he began active dramatic writing, first as a collaborator with more experienced playwrights — primarily Thomas Dekker, but also John Webster and William Rowley —& by the later 1620s as a solo artist.
Ford is best known for the tragedy ‘Tis Pity She’s A Whore (1633), a family drama with a plot line of incest. The play's title has often been changed in new productions, sometimes being referred to as simply Giovanni and Annabella — the play's leading, incestuous brother-and-sister characters; in a nineteenth-century work it is coyly called The Brother and Sister.[11] Shocking as the play is, it is still widely regarded as a classic piece of English drama.
He was a major playwright during the reign of Charles I. His plays deal with conflicts between individual passion and conscience and the laws and morals of society at large; Ford had a strong interest in abnormal psychology that is expressed through his dramas. His plays often show the influence of Robert Burton's The Anatomy of Melancholy. While virtually nothing is known of Ford's personal life, one reference suggests that Ford's interest in melancholia may have been more than merely intellectual. The volume Choice Drollery(1656) asserts that
Deep in a dump alone John Ford was gat,With folded arms and melancholy hat.[12]

The Works of Ford

Background Info

He was baptized at Ilsington in Devonshire, April 17, 1586
Entered Exeter College, Oxford, in March, 1601 and was admitted to the Middle Temple in November 1602.
Ford left home to study in London, although more specific details are unclear a sixteen-year-old John Ford of Devon was admitted to Exeter College in Oxford on 26 March 1601, but this was when the dramatist had not yet reached his sixteenth birthday. He joined an institution that was a prestigious law school but also a centre of literary and dramatic activity the Middle Temple. A prominent junior member in 1601 was the playwright John Marston (It is unknown whether Ford ever actually studied law while a resident of the Middle Temple, or whether he was strictly a gentleman boarder, which was a common arrangement at the time).
He first appeared in print with Fame's Memorial (1606), a long elegy on the death of the Earl of Devonshire, and he published other occasional pieces before he finally committed himself to a dramatic career.

Background (Continued)

It was not until 1606 that Ford wrote his first works for publication. In the spring of that year he was expelled from Middle Temple, due to his financial problems, and Fame's Memorial and Honour Triumphant soon followed. Both works are clear bids for patronage : Fame's Memorial is an elegy of 1169 lines on the recently deceased Charles Blount, 1st Earl of Devonshire, while Honour Triumphant is a prose pamphlet, a verbal fantasia written in connection with the jousts planned for the summer 1606 visit of King Christian IV of Denmark. It is unknown whether either of these brought any financial remuneration to Ford; yet by June 1608 he had enough money to be readmitted to the Middle Temple.


The Works of Ford
Full transcript