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Persuasive: Final

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Megan Snell

on 2 December 2015

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Transcript of Persuasive: Final

- Pearls arrival forces the members of the 'lay-off' group to reconsider the way they are perceived by society (Barney and Roo are no longer a 'coupla' kings', and Olive is no longer has her romantic dream (waiting for the men to 'fly down' out of the 'sun'.)
- Nancy's departure makes Olive feel defensive of her life and dream, and prompts her to find validation in Pearl
- Nancy's rejection of Barney also leads to him seeking validation with Pearl. In turn, Roo's rejection of the gang leaves Barney questioning whether his friendship with Roo is worth what he always assumed it was.
-Roo's rejection of the gang leaves him questioning whether his friendship with Barney is as strong as he thought. It also prompts him to reconsider the nature of his relationship with Olive, leading to his decision to propose to her.
Introduction to persuasive writing
Essay
Types of persuasive texts
Checklist
Have you...
Your persuasive piece will be made up of ideas and responses to the following influences:
The context (Exploring issues of identity and belonging)
The prompt ('The nature of relationships can be profoundly altered when people leave, or join, groups')
The text, ‘Summer of the Seventeenth Doll’
'Nature of relationships'- dynamics within relationships/groups, the way members of group see themselves and the group, the way others see them, the importance placed on membership to the group by members
'Profoundly altered'- changed in such a way that no amount of time or 'mending' will ever make it the same again. Insinuates that not only has dynamic changed, but also the attitudes of the people in the group- they now see and feel about the group in a different way, and will never be able to see it (or themselves) as they once did.
'Leave'- idea of rejection, of the group not being as important to some members as it is to others
'Join'- Bringing in an 'outsiders' perspective, which will challenge the way people already part of the group see themselves and their group. Could be positive- why has an ouysoder chosen to join this group? What are they hoping to gain from membership?

Summer of the Seventeenth Doll
Persuasive Writing
Constructing your argument
A good essay offers a clear line if argument. Your ideas must be presented in a cohesive and well-organised fashion and the case supported with evidence. All essays require:
- Ensured that you have used elements from ‘Summer of the Seventeenth Doll’ to inform your thinking and writing?
- Determined a purpose and audience?
- Developed a contention and line of argument?
- Decided on your evidence to best support your case?
- Planned an appropriate structure that is consistent with the chosen form?
- Rebut as many elements of
the alternate view as
possible?
Forms
The nature of relationships can be profoundly altered when people leave, or join, groups.
Speech
Opinion piece
Letter
Essay
Editorial
Use of persuasive techniques
Language for presenting and sustaining an argument
Tone, style and vocabulary tailored to suit a target audience
Persuasive forms such as opinion pieces, editorials and speeches will be familiar to you from your previous study of persuasive language in media texts. These forms allow you to present a clear and strong response and to use a range of persuasive language techniques (showing your understanding of the relationship between form, language and purpose).
Features of persuasive texts
TIP:
Don’t be too one-sided or strident in presenting your point of view as this will limit your exploration of ideas and arguments.

TIP: Imagine a tree, trunk, branches and leaves. The trunk, the support structure that holds up the tree, represents your contention. Branches grow from the trunk, representing key reasons or arguments that develop from the central contention. Leaves signify the necessary evidence and details, illustrations, quotes, statistics, and other persuasive techniques.

Each element is essential to the growth and health of the tree
Arguing a case involves:
A clearly stated contention (your point of view)
Reasons that support your contention
Evidence that supports your reasons
Rebuttal
Appropriate persuasive language, given your intended audience

- An introduction that must include the contention and your main arguments. Introductions should be engaging.
- Three or four body paragraphs, each of which examines a different aspect of your argument.
- A rebuttal, which will strengthen your argument if you anticipate opposing views and counter them.
- A conclusion that summarises your position
Opinion pieces are different from essays in that they work from the particular to the general. Frequently, opinion pieces start with an anecdote designed to illustrate or personalise the issue. They then move onto a general exploration of the issue as a whole. Some features of this form are:
Opinion Piece
- A headline
- Some reference to the context in which you are writing
- An opening anecdote
- The use of a first-person voice
Letters to the editor vary significantly in style and structure. Some adopt a more informal structure, whereas some are structured similarly to an essay. Some tips for writing these are as follows:
Present your contention reasonably early
Address appropriately (ie. Dear Sir/Madame) and write your name and suburb at the end
Clearly state the context in which you are writing
Consider adopting a persona in order to appeal to a target audience
Personalise your response to the issue through the use of anecdotes or by writing in first-person

Letters to the editor
A speech is NOT an essay read aloud. It is CRUCIAL to acknowledge your audience, both at the beginning of your speech and throughout. Some tips for writing a speech are:
- Deliver your contention early
- Create an opening designed to engage your audience, for example offer a challenging question or an emotive anecdote
- Include a formal introduction
- Adopt strategies to demonstrate ongoing awareness of your audience- eg. Address them directly using the second person, appeal for their support and understanding
- Signposting- you must signal your structure to your audience
- Simple, clear sentences that flag the line of reasoning as you speak
- Use persuasive techniques
- Use a tone that is appropriate to the subject- eg. Don’t make jokes about war
- End with a powerful conclusion or punch line that leaves your audience thinking

Speech
Influences
Prompt
Spine
- How others see us often conflicts with the way we see ourselves
- Our sense of worth is developed through our ability to be accepted by others
- Despite how confident within ourselves we may appear, we all need validation and affirmation from others.
- Rejection can make us question not only our own worth, but also the worthiness of the people we chose to spend time with.
- Inviting new people into our lives can lead us to challenge the values, beliefs, and perceptions we have previously taken for granted.
The nature of relationships can be profoundly altered when people leave, or join, groups.
Ideas from 'Summer of the Seventeenth Doll' that can be used.
Your persuasive piece will be made up of ideas and responses to the following influences:
The context (Exploring issues of identity and belonging)
The prompt ('It is dangerous to rely too strongly on membership of a group for your own sense of self and worth.')
The text, ‘Summer of the Seventeenth Doll’
'It is dangerous'- what happens to us when we lose or damage our sense of self? How important is it to have a strong sense of who we are and where we belong, and how terribly will be we effected if something changes our idea of who we are? Is a loss of identity 'dangerous'?
'Membership of a group'- does our own sense of identity depend as much on where we belong as what we believe, or value, or want? How much can who we love, where we choose to be, and who we choose to spend our time with effect our own ideas of who we are? Do we always choose where we belong? (Religion, family, cults, as opposed to friendship groups, relationships/marriages).
'Own sense of self'- Can we ever truly develop a sense of self and worth without the validation or approval of others?

It is dangerous to rely too strongly on membership of a group for your own sense of self and worth.
Influences
Prompt
Spine
- Committing ourselves wholeheartedly to a group leaves us vulnerable.
- Relying too heavily on validation from others can mean that we never truly understand what we want, need, believe or value.
- Depending too much on a lover can leave you irreversibly damaged at the end of a relationship.
- Our sense of worth is developed through our ability to be accepted by others
- Despite how confident within ourselves we may appear, we all need validation and affirmation from others.
- Rejection can make us question not only our own worth, but also the worthiness of the people we chose to spend time with.
- Olive commits herself completely and totally to her relationship with Roo and the lay-off. When the group falls apart, she is left shattered, lost and devastated.
- Nancy, on the other hand, is able to detach herself from the group when she sees that it will not be able to provide her with what she wants and needs in her life.
- Barney, too, is able to remove himself from the group. He invests as much of himself in his role in the cane-cutting gang and in his image as a Casanova as he does in the lay-off, so when he sees that things are not the same it is easy for him to cut his losses and leave Olive and Pearl.
- Roo loves Olive, but also has a life outside of the lay-off. This is why he is willing to compromise and accept a new sort of relationship with Olive.

It is dangerous to rely too strongly on membership of a group for your own sense of self and worth.
Ideas from 'Summer of the Seventeenth Doll' that can be used.
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