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Using Technology to Personalize in TPRS

ASTE 2011 presentation
by

Michele Whaley

on 8 July 2011

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Transcript of Using Technology to Personalize in TPRS

Personalizing
in the
World Language Classroom How to Personalize? Demos Embedded Reading Where to store? Links Language Teacher Tools TPRS Workshops TPRS Sites Quia:http://www.quia.com/(paid site)
Quizlet: http://www.quizlet.com/ (free)
ClearMSU: http://clear.msu.edu/clear/store/products.php?product_category=online/
WikiSpaces (free for teachers): http://www.wikispaces.com/content/for/teacher/ Use TPR Storytelling Steps
Establish meaning
Use the language
Read Russian demo New Vocabulary lyubit: loves
idyot v: goes to
smotrit na: looks at Biggest obstacle:
contrast between the
textbook and stories Rosie lyubit chocolad. Rosie
idyot v Chilkoots. V Chilkoots
Brad Pitt smotrit na Rosie. Brad
Pitt lyubit Rosie. Rosie nye lyubit
Brad Pitt. V Chilkoots nyet
chocolada. Rosie idyot v Humpy's.
Brad Pitt idyot v Humpy's. V Humpy's
chocolad. Rosie smotrit na chocolad.
Rosie nye smotrit na Brad Pitt. da: yes
nyet: no
nye: not
v: to/at
eelee: or
kto: who
kooda: where lyubit: loves
eedyot v: goes to smotrit na: looks at Embedded reading:
another way to personalize NTPRS: http://tinyurl.com/48rdlzt
Cancun: http://tinyurl.com/4tjva9z Susan Gross:http://susangrosstprs.com/
More TPRS forum: moretprs.com
Yahoo listserve: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/moretprs/join
MW blog: http://mjtprs.wordpress.com
Beth Skelton forms: http://www.bethskelton.com/handouts-and-forms.html
Laurie Clarcq's blog: http://blog.heartsforteaching.com/ Teacher website
http://www.martinabex.com Use a Wikispace
http://russianrocks.wikispaces.com/ ASD Site builder or Moodle Convert a text for differentiation Or Bottom Up Top Down Level 1 from "Kin Selection as the Key to Altruism" by Edward O. Wilson

There is evidence that natural selection is the driving force for origin of colonies. Such colonies are favored by their superior ability.

Colonies are often founded by unrelated queens. Workers do not show preference for their own mothers, and colonies remain well organized and stable.

The critical force of evolution appears to be ecological natural selection. Colonies may evolve by group formation with altruistic workers. Colonies of most social insect species are composed of closely related individuals. Once colonies have evolved, members of the worker caste tend to be closely related to one another simply because they have common parentage. Level 2
If there is as yet no evidence that collateral kin selection drives colonies’ workers, there is evidence that the driving force is natural selection. Such colonies are favored by their superior ability to create and defend nest sites, allowing them refuges from which to forage for food. These communal nest sites include chambers for ants and termites, cavities in sponges, plant galls, and the soil burrow systems of naked mole rats.
Moreover, colonies are often founded by unrelated queens. Workers do not show preference for their own mothers in multiple-queen colonies, and colonies remain well organized and stable.In short, the critical binding force of colony evolution appears to be ecological natural selection. It may well occur in nature, that colonies evolve by the favoring of genes that prescribe group formation with altruistic workers. Colonies of most social insect species are composed of closely related individuals.
Writers have jumped to the conclusion that kinship must have been a driving force in the origins of colonies. But this step in logic is a non sequitur. The reverse appears to be the case: once colonies have evolved, members of the worker caste tend to be closely related to one another simply because they have common parentage. Level 3 (The Original Text)
If there is as yet no evidence that collateral kin selection drives or biases the origin of colonies with nonreproductive workers, there is abundant evidence that the driving force is natural selection by pressures and opportunities in the environment. Such colonies are favored by their superior ability to create and defend nest sites that are stable over extended periods of time, allowing them refuges from which to forage for food. These communal nest sites include chambers in soil and leaf litter for ants, similar chambers in decaying wood for termites, cavities in sponges for snapping shrimps, plant galls for aphids and thrips, and the soil burrow systems of naked mole rats.
Moreover, a growing body of research has disclosed that colonies of social ants and wasps are often founded by unrelated queens; that workers do not show preference for their own mothers in multiple-queen colonies, only occasionally for their sisters; and that colonies remain well organized and stable even in the extreme cases when the workers composing them are only very distantly related or not at all (Choe and Crespi, 1997; Holldobler and Wilson, in preparation).
In short, the critical binding force of colony evolution appears to be ecological natural selection operating at the level of the colony, a level that comprises both colonies versus individuals, and colonies versus other colonies. It is theoretically possible, and may well occur in nature, that colonies evolve by the selective favoring of genes that prescribe group formation with altruistic workers in a manner that has little or nothing to do with kinship. It is often remarked, and much made of the fact, that colonies of most social insect species are composed of closely related individuals. Writers have jumped to the conclusion that kinship must therefore have been a driving or at least biasing force in the origins of colonies. But this step in logic is a non sequitur. The reverse increasingly appears to be the case: once colonies have evolved, members of the worker caste tend to be closely related to one another simply because they have common parentage. http://prezi.com/ptkbfzxg6t1f/embedded-reading/ Prezi
http://prezi.com
This prezi
http://tinyurl.com/4htgess Here's the full version of the prezi, "Embedded Reading." Personalizing => Differentiation Textbooks do NOT lead to differentiation! Clip art sources:
<a href="http://www.school-clip-art.com/">Find Free Clipart at School Clip Art</a>
http://webclipart.about.com/od/msubmenu29/Black_and_White_Clip_Art.htm
http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/images/?CTT=97 Create embedded readings Teacher doubles each text
Students submit ideas written or orally
Another class adds ideas
Teacher reduces a complex story
Teacher reduces a complex text Embedded readings
clarify key concepts for all
develop interest in subsequent readings
challenge high-level students Author your own "texts"
Student songs
Student stories
Teacher-made quizzes
Student-made quizzes
Use gripping visuals Embed audio files
by students
for students Use google to search for key terms Collect links Create assignments Store song collections Make your own quizzes
on Quia Save class stories Collaborate on quizzes Reduce an original text by about a third each time to get just the essentials. Keep the target high-frequency vocabulary in each version (here: benevolent). From Freedom, by Jonathan Franzen Present pictures From Laurie Clarcq
http://blog.heartsforteaching.com/2010/12/27/for-chabe.aspx or on Google docs
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