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Copy of Presentation Skills

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by

Lelanie Judeel

on 21 November 2014

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Transcript of Copy of Presentation Skills

Presentation skills
Why??
To assist you with your Project Management Presentations
Examples of weak and strong presentations
Dealing with nerves
How to structure a presentation
Referencing (Harvard)
Examples of weak presentations
Choose a colour scheme, which is readable and professional
Use a consistent font and font size throughout the presentation
Keep bullet points to one/two lines
Use the bullet points as prompts, this shows your understanding of the information
Limit the words on each slide
You may be required at some point to present in your career
e.g. pitching ideas to stakeholders
Reading off the slides
Reading a script
Too many words
Font style
Colour format slides
by Lelanie Judeel
Practice, practice and practice
Breathing techniques
Positive Self Talk
Imagery
Example of good presentations skills: Steve Jobs
Any Questions
Clear structure
Keep the content relevant
Speaks clearly
Confident
Enthusiastic
Vary tone of voice
Eye contact
Provide a summary slide at the end followed by reference list
Designing slides
Signposting

Delivering a supercharged presentation
OBJECTIVES:
Are you making sense?
Combating
presentation
nerves
Signposts
To conclude
Moving on to
First of all
Signposts are quick cues to the audience that the speech is moving from one point to another. Signposts are often short statements such as “first,” “second,” and “next,” They are called signposts because they quickly point out to the audience where we all are in the speech.
What are "signposts" and what
are their purpose in presentations?
What categories can
signposts be put into?

To say more
To expand on

To elaborate on

In addition
To sequence points
First of all

Lastly
To go back
Finally

To conclude
To indicate movement
to a new point
Moving on to

To turn to

To digress
To provide an example
For example
Such as

For instance
To show contrast
However
Whereas
But
On the other hand
Word stress is your magic key to
understanding spoken English. Native
speakers of English use word stress naturally. Word
stress is so natural for them that they don't even know they use it.
Word Stress
Simple Rule:
Natural stress in segment of speech:
Content words
are stressed -
grammar
words are unstressed
Robert went to the park on Friday.
When presenting, it is often useful to
EMPHASIZE
certain content words that are important for your purpose e.g. when promoting something you might want to
EMPHASIZE
certain
POSITIVE
words relating to content.
Chunking
There are two important elements involved in

chunking -

stress


and
pause



Let us take the opening sentence of an article:

Chunking is a principle that applies to the effective communication
of information between humans.
First we decide where to pause, for example:

Chunking


is a principle

that applies to the effective communication of

information

between humans.
Next we decide which are the important words, and when we say them, we
stress
those words by making them
louder
and
longer,
and by marking the stressed syllable of the word with a
rising
pitch.

CHUNKING

is a
PRINCIPLE

that applies to the
EFFECTIVE COMMUNICATION
of


INFORMATION

between
HUMANS.
DO


DON’T

Look/present at the screen

Look at the floor

Stoop/bad posture

Read notes

Stand still

Present to one person/one area
of the room
Make eye contact

Be positive

Stand tall/good posture

Speak clearly, slowly, with
intonation

Use body Language

Present to the group/room
A good presenter
Referencing (Harvard)
Reference in text

Reference images/tables

Support facts with theory

List all references on the last slide

According to Mitchell (2012)....

..... leadership in democracy can
have an effect on media
freedom (Mitchell, 2012).
In-text referencing
Figure 1: An exciting presentation. (Cartoonstock, 2013)
Reference list

Blake, N. (1998). Using the web in undergraduate education. Journal of Educational Computing, 5(2):234-251.

Blake, N. (1999). Higher Education in the 21st century. New York: University Press.

Edulink, 3(2). Available from: http://www.joburg.ac.za/edtech/pubs/edulink/992/blake.html

Davis, K. (1987). Computer-based training for accountants. Unpublished doctoral thesis. Johannesburg: Rand Afrikaans University.

Education Trust. (1999). Using videos in your classroom (Brochure). Sandton: Eduprint.
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Presentation Assessment Criteria:
40 marks in total
Each member must present
1 HOUR -
INCLUDING Q & A
session
Lecturer and 2 external moderators
Hand in 1 file only per team
1. Welcoming (PM)
Set the scene (placement of "clients")
Introduction
Company name
Introduce team
Dates of project shedule
Question policy
2. Introduction
Short overview of project brief
Aim of presentation
Main headings to be covered
3. Strategic Intent
Company vision, mission and values
4. Concept and Initiation Phase
Life cycle phase (inputs, process, outputs)
Approval of business case
Approval of project carter
5. Design and Development Phase
Scope statement
Project life cycle
Work breakdown structure
Build Method
Quality philosophy and standards
Risk probability, impact & response matrix (risk management)
Communications (committees, meetings, reports, press release)
Pictures/drawings on prototype

6. Implementation Phase
Gantt Chart
Work breakdown structure
Project and phase durations
Critical path
Major milestones, sign offs and completion of deliverables
OBS on Gantt chart
7. Presentation Style
Smooth handover between speakers
Speakers face audience and present from cards
Well-rehearsed presentations with enthusiasm
Was the project plan clear and understood by audience?
Successful Q & A session
Full transcript