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The Salem Witch Trials Prezi

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Jenna Ellerman

on 7 November 2013

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Transcript of The Salem Witch Trials Prezi

Beginning History of The Salem Witch Trials:
The Salem Witch Trials:
Map of Salem Village (1692):
By: Kelly Decker, Jenna Funte, Jamie Baldwin, Chuyu Chen, and Olivia Delagardelle
LeBeau, Bryan F. "Chapter 1." The Story of the Salem Witch Trials: "we Walked in Clouds and Could Not See Our Way" Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall, 1998. 1-3. Print.
What Were The Citizens Afraid Of?:
The townspeople were absolutely terrified of the devil and his immoral works.
It was believed that the devil would give the witches power to hurt people as a reward for their loyalty.
Thousands of people that were believed to practice witchcraft were executed, including men, woman, and children.
Upham, W.P. . Map of Salem Village in 1692. 1856. Photograph. History of MassachusettsWeb. 17 Oct 2013. <http://historyofmassachusetts.org/the-salem-witch-trials/>.
Matteson , Tompkins . “Trial of George Jacobs of Salem for Witchcraft”. 1855. Painting. History of MassachusettsWeb. 15 Oct 2013. <http://historyofmassachusetts.org/the-salem-witch-trials/>.
Where The Trials Took Place:
The Salem Witch Trials took place in Massachusetts from 1692 to 1963. Other witch trails took place in other countries between the 1300s and 1600s.
Brooks, Rebecca. "The Salem Witch Trials." History of Massachusetts. N.p.. Web. 17 Oct 2013. <http://historyofmassachusetts.org/the-salem-witch-trials/>.
Blumber, Jess. "A Brief History of the Salem Witch Trials ." Smithsonian Mag. Smithsonian Mag, 24 Oct 2007. Web. 17 Oct 2013. <http://www.smithsonianmag.com/history-archaeology/brief-salem.html>.
Plye, Howard. A girl is accused during the Salem Witch Trials. N.d. Photograph. Smithsonian MagWeb. 17 Oct 2013. <http://www.smithsonianmag.com/history-archaeology/brief-salem.html>.
"Salem Witch Trials Timeline." Salem Witch Trials. N.p., n.d. Web. 17 Oct 2013. <http://www.salemwitchtrials.com/timeline.html>.
Witch Misconceptions:
Most witches were thought to be women. In the seventeenth-century, Europeans described witches as: "rising from their beds in the dark of the night to attend their Sabbat." After the Sabbat, they would have a feast accompanied by eating, dining, and offering to the Devil the bodies of infants. After the rituals, the witches would return home to their unsuspecting families.
LeBeau, Bryan F. "Chapter 1." The Story of the Salem Witch Trials: "we Walked in Clouds and Could Not See Our Way" Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall, 1998. 1-3. Print.
April:
Mary Easty was found guilty of witchcraft.
Elisha Hutchinson of the Boston Magistrate issued a warrant for Rev. George Burrough's arrest.
May:
George Burrough was arrested at his home in Wells, Maine.
George was examined by the Salem Magistrates.
Sarah Osborne died in prison.
Mary Easty was released from prison:
Mercy Lewis became ill.
Mary Easty was accused for her illness and arrested again.
An arrest warrant was issued for Sarah, Benjamin, and William Proctor - daughter and sons of John and Elizabeth Proctor.
1693:
May:
Governor Phips excused the remaining accused of witchcraft.
Key Figures in the Salem Witch Trials:
Cotton Mather: Believer of witchcraft and a minster of Boston's Old North church.
Increase Mather: During the witch trials, he was a Boston minster. He was the father of Cotton Mather and the first president of Harvard University.
Samuel Paris: Became Salem Village's minister. Focused his sermons on a conspiracy of Satan taking hold of Salem.
The Accused Witches:
Bridget Bishop
George Burroughs
Giles Corey
Mary Easty
Sarah Good
Rebecca Nurse
John Proctor
Philip & Mary English
Buhr , Chris, and Katherine Sutcliffe. "Biographies of Key Figures in the Salem Witchcraft Trials." Law 2. N.p.. Web. 29 Oct 2013. <http://law2.umkc.edu/faculty/projects/ftrials/salem/ASAL_BI.HTM>.
Who Were the Puritans?:
Followed the Pilgrims in the 1630s to make a home on the new land of England.
The Puritans wanted to wipe out the Catholic influence.
We formed the "American Dream" around the Puritans because they had goals and settled on a new land.
Not everyone in Salem was a Puritan:
If you did not attend the Puritan Church, you were suspected of witchcraft.
Gallery of Famous 17th-Century Puritan Theologians:
Foner, Eric, and John Garraty. "Puritanism." History of Massachusetts. Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Web. 31 Oct 2013. <http://www.history.com/topics/puritanism/page3>.
Timeline Of Events:
1688:
November:
Reverend Samuel Paris preaches in Salem Village for the first time.
1692:
January 20:
Samuel Paris' daughter, Bettys, becomes sick.
More girls from Salem Village become sick.
February:
Dr. William Griggs, inferred that the girls were bewitched.
Mary Sibley advised Samuel Paris' servant, Tituba, to bake a witch cake that would help the girls identify who was bewitching them.
Complaints were made against Tituba, Sarah Good, and Sarah Osborne; they were later arrested for suspicion of witchcraft.
March:
Tituba confessed to witchcraft.
Sarah Osborne, Sarah Good, and Tituba are sent to a Boston prison.

Works Cited:
Upham, W.P. . Map of Salem Village in 1692. 1856. Photograph. History of MassachusettsWeb. 17 Oct 2013. <http://historyofmassachusetts.org/the-salem-witch-trials/>.
Brooks, Rebecca. "The Salem Witch Trials." History of Massachusetts. N.p.. Web. 17 Oct 2013. <http://historyofmassachusetts.org/the-salem-witch-trials/>.
Blumber, Jess. "A Brief History of the Salem Witch Trials ." Smithsonian Mag. Smithsonian Mag, 24 Oct 2007. Web. 17 Oct 2013. <http://www.smithsonianmag.com/history-archaeology/brief-salem.html>.
LeBeau, Bryan F. "Chapter 1." The Story of the Salem Witch Trials: "we Walked in Clouds and Could Not See Our Way" Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall, 1998. 1-3. Print.
"Salem Witch Trials Timeline." Salem Witch Trials. N.p., n.d. Web. 17 Oct 2013. <http://www.salemwitchtrials.com/timeline.html>.
Foner, Eric, and John Garraty. "Puritanism." History of Massachusetts. Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Web. 31 Oct 2013. <http://www.history.com/topics/puritanism/page3>.
LeBeau, Bryan F. "Chapter 1." The Story of the Salem Witch Trials: "we Walked in Clouds and Could Not See Our Way" Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall, 1998. 1-3. Print.
Buhr , Chris, and Katherine Sutcliffe. "Biographies of Key Figures in the Salem Witchcraft Trials." Law 2. N.p.. Web. 29 Oct 2013. <http://law2.umkc.edu/faculty/projects/ftrials/salem/ASAL_BI.HTM>.
"History Channel: Salem Witch Trials." YouTube. YouTube, 01 Mar. 2011. Web. 23 Oct. 2013.
Story Of How It All Started:
Betty Parris was the first of the girls to become ill. She contorted in pain, complained of fever, and hid under furniture. The source of her symptoms may have been some combination of stress, asthma, guilt, boredom, child abuse, and epilepsy. When Betty's friends started to exhibit similar behavior, talk of witchcraft increased.

What Does Witchcraft Mean?
The word, "witchcraft," comes from the Old English verb, "wiccan," which means "the art of bewitching, casting spells, or manipulating the forces of nature in a supernatural way."
Religious leaders thought such things were not possible without the work of the Devil.
Present Day Witchcraft:
Contrary to common belief, witches do not ride on broom sticks or wear black clothing with pointed black hats.

Witches practice Wicca, which is a religion where one worships nature and believes everything created is sacred.

There are many shows today that deal with witchcraft.
*Here are a few:
American Horror Story: Coven
The Wizards of Waverly Place
The Vampire Diaries
Witches of East End
True Blood
Full transcript