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Instructional Design Philosophy

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Sandra Hsieh

on 21 September 2013

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Transcript of Instructional Design Philosophy

My ID Philosophy
Personal Philosophy of Instructional Design
Presentation Outline
My Career Vision
as a
Museum Instructional Designer
In free-choice educational environments like museums, learners will engage with activities, exhibits or programs only as long as those offerings hold their interest (Dancu, Gutwill & Hido, 2011).

However, to provide “engaging learning experiences” has not yet become a common focus in Taiwan's museums.

I would like to spread the idea in Taiwan and design
engaging and playful museum experiences
that effectively promote learning.
The power and attraction of the [technology] are very impressive and can in certain circumstances be effective in attracting visitors to receive the message successfully (Economou, 1998).
Design Principles
Sandra Wenhsing Hsieh
Career vision
Instructional design philosophy
- Design process & scholarly foundations
- Design principles
Technology and my ID philosophy
1. Identify desired results

2. Analyze audience characteristics

3. Identify characteristics of
instructional materials

4. Design & develop learning experiences

5. Implement learning program

6. Analyze learner feedback and evaluate
the program
Technology and My ID Philosophy
Design Process
Scholarly Foundations
Backward Design
ARCS
ADDIE
1. Identify Desired Results
2. Determine Acceptable Evidence of Learning
3. Design Learning Experiences & Instruction
1. Knowing and identifying the elements of human motivation,
2. Analyzing audience characteristics to determine motivational requirements
3. Identifying characteristics of instructional materials and processes that stimulate motivation,
4. Selecting appropriate motivational tactics, and
5. Applying and evaluating appropriate tactics.
1. Analysis
2. Design
3. Development
4. Implementation
5. Evaluation
Falk, J.H., Dierking, L.D., and Holland, D.G. (1995). What do we think people learn in museums? In Falk, J.H. and Dierking, L.D. (Eds.). Public Institutions for Personal Learning: Establishing a Research Agenda. American Association of Museums.
planned with the final assessment in mind
Motivational design- improving learners’ motivation to learn
Straightforward and could be easily implemented; Step-by-step process helps create effective instructions; Consistent and cost effective.
Direct:
objects are provided in context, in as close to their real-world settings as possible
Personal and active:
questions are relevant and there are opportunities to interact
Socially-mediated:
visitors share information across generations and social groups

Technology can be used to create learning contexts that is close to the real-world setting.
Direct
Interactive technology can not only promotes interaction but also provides individualized learning.
Personal and active
Finally, technology can help me reach my goal--- to design
engaging and playful museum experiences
that effectively promote learning.
Thank you.
References
Dancu, T., Gutwill, J. P., & Hido, N. (2011). Using iterative design and evaluation to develop playful learning experiences. Children, Youth and Environments, 21(2), 338-359.

Economou, M. (1998). The evaluation of museum multimedia applications: Lessons from research. Museum Management and Curatorship, 17(2), 173-187. Retrieved from
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/09647779800501702

Falk, J.H., Dierking, L.D., and Holland, D.G. (1995). What do we think people learn in museums? In Falk, J.H. and Dierking, L.D. (Eds.). Public Institutions for Personal Learning: Establishing a Research Agenda. American Association of Museums.

Culatta, R. C. (2011). Instructional design models. Retrieved from http://www.instructionaldesign.org/models/index.html
Full transcript