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Punishment Poetry Analysis

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by

Karina Paredes

on 9 October 2012

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Transcript of Punishment Poetry Analysis

photo credit Nasa / Goddard Space Flight Center / Reto Stöckli By: Karina Paredes Punishment
Seamus Heaney Punishment Thesis At first the loving tone of the poem invites the reader to sympathize for the girl due to the barbaric punishment in her time, but through the use of enjambment the past merges with the present to remind the reader of the resilient aspect of cruelty in human nature, encouraging the reader to question civil rights in today’s society. Body is heavy (filled with sin and punishment)
Compares her body to a tree I can see her drowned
body in the bog,
the weighing stone,
the floating rods and boughs. Indicates decomposition of corpse
of your brain's exposed
and darkened combs,
your muscles' webbing
and all your numbered bones: A person who enjoys seeing pain or distress of others
He is artful in imagining the past and what she looked like Imagines his own part in her death: Even now he would observe from a distance like a “Peeping Tom” instead of taking action I almost love you
but would have cast, I know,
the stones of silence.
I am the artful voyeur Indicates decomposition Tense change Under which at first
she was a barked sapling
that is dug up
oak-bone, brain-firkin: Her exposure to the wind indicates her vulnerability
(striped down to nakedness) Speaker imagines execution I can feel the tug
of the halter at the nape
of her neck, the wind
on her naked front. Seems to mock civilization Almost blames himself for her ill treatment I who have stood dumb
when your betraying sisters,
cauled in tar,
wept by the railings, Punished for other’s faults Skinny, poor
Speaker felt as if he knew her you were flaxen-haired, (blonde)
undernourished, and your
tar-black face was beautiful.
My poor scapegoat, Imagery of a ship’s system of ropes for support show vulnerability Metaphor aids explicit description It blows her nipples
to amber beads,
it shakes the frail rigging
of her ribs. The speaker knows its wrong but knows that he also has that small desire to get revenge Oxymoron Secretly allow something wrong to occur who would connive
in civilized outrage
yet understand the exact
and tribal, intimate revenge. Change in tone to present (using past tense) Sympathetic tone Simile encourages sympathy for such cruelty Enjambment
Gift of adultery is a noose instead of a wedding ring her shaved head
like a stubble of black corn,
her blindfold a soiled bandage,
her noose a ring

to store
the memories of love.
Little adultress,
before they punished you Change in tone to present (using past tense) Sympathetic tone Simile encourages sympathy for such cruelty Enjambment
Gift of adultery is a noose instead of a wedding ring her shaved head
like a stubble of black corn,
her blindfold a soiled bandage,
her noose a ring

to store
the memories of love.
Little adultress,
before they punished you The End Indicates decomposition of corpse
of your brain's exposed
and darkened combs,
your muscles' webbing
and all your numbered bones:
Full transcript