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Social-Cultural Theory Toolbox

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on 3 December 2014

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Transcript of Social-Cultural Theory Toolbox

Structure
Network
Agency
Organizing systems of patterns and practice grounding in a logic that transcends individual consciousness and act to enable and constrain agents. (Bourdieu, 1977; Hays, 1994)
The total sum of agents and the ties/relationships that connect them (Pescosolido, 2007). Ties/relationships represent the intersections of
agent’s life matrixes (Grossberg, 1994)
The relative independence a social actor (agent) to act and influence one’s environment. (Bandura, 2008; Dewey, 1938; Pescosolido, 2007)
Ideology
The underpinning values and ontological positions that inform structure, network ties, and agentic practice. Two considerations
the unquestioned and unconscious concepts taken as natural, thus leading the way for misrecognition of arbitrary nature of things (Bourdieu, 1977).
Agenda
Doxa
Cultural Pedagogy
is something you build upon, we can’t leave our development up to such a
rigid existence but we can use it as a fundamental catalyst to achieve new found
abilities and achievements.

Cultural competence
Symbolic Capital
non-monetary units that can be acquired, accumulated, and exchanged for positive personal gains (Moore, 2004)

-what constitutes capital, and its value, is defined by the perception of others; usually from a dominant group (Siisiäinen, 2000)

-systematically misrecognized (Moore, 2004)

-abilities and skills are not capital, but having them is capital (human capital)
-non-physical cultural products (Wright, 2008) (Baumann, 2007)
-trust (Siisiäinen, 2000)

Chosen ideological pathways and positions that one might take. These are more intentional and conscious. Informed by notions of:

The Right:
Individual liberty and autonomy (Mantie & Tucker, 2012)

The Good:
Normative and socially created conception of what is good for all or the “good life” (Mantie & Tucker, 2012)
cohesion, roots, language, culture, together, sustaining a community “is a long – term proposition” Graves, James Bau,
We are a community of musicians, artists, we are as Peter Sellars states, diffusers of bombs, we are communication moving in both directions.
where you live, directs you where to go, communities within communities, and groups with same ideals banding together for a commonality.
Different people with similar lives that share certain things
Common experiences
When something happens it can affect everyone
Can be places where people talk to each other and form opinions that can effect all.
Doesn’t have to be a place at all – The Web

“Olive Trees are important, they represent everything that roots us, anchors us, identifies us and locates us in the world----whether it be belonging to a family, a community, a tribe, a nation, a religion, or most of all, a place called home. Olive trees are what give us the warmth of family, the joy of individuality, the intimacy of personal rituals, the depth of private relationships.”
Graves, James Bau

Arbitraries
socially constructed, relational identities of otherness, often defined by the dominant group of a specific setting. (Moore, 2004)

-Examples: Class, Disability, Ethnicity, Gender, Pedagogy, Race, Sexuality
Habits
Bonding
Bridging
Capacity
Reciprocity
Production of Culture
Shared meanings, what habits it involves, are dependent upon and create these things. (Goble 2010)
Misrecognition
Naturalization of one’s cultural position. (Mcknight & Chandler, 2012)

When the principle of capital is represented as its opposite. (Moore, 2004)
Socializing and association with people who are like you; the mechanism of belonging. (Putnam, 2000)
Symbolic Violence
Misrecognition and imposition of an arbitrary, usually through pedagogic action. (Bourdieu & Passeron, 1990; Mcknight & Chandler, 2012; Moore, 2004)
-able to sustain inequalities through a process by which the people engaged in the power-down position are complicit in their own domination (Mcknight & Chandler, 2012)

Socializing and association with people who are not like you. (Putnam, 2000)
The ability of a community to deal with enhancing or inhibiting the community from reaching goals, overcoming challenges, or sustainability at individual, institutional, and societal levels. (Stuber, 2009; Papastephanou, 2006; Siisiäinen, 2000)
Authenticity
belief that different cultural products originate from, and belong to, a certain community. (Wang, 2009)
A behavioral component of communities manifested in the social norm that individuals within the community will respond to each other in similar ways (Moore, 2004; Van Ingen & Van Eijck, 2009)
Approach or perspective oriented towards the study of culture, which conceptualizes the latter as a usually incoherent set of symbolic elements. (Goble, 2010)
Hegemony
The use, reproduction, and tolerance of an authority's power as it dominates complicit others. (Althusser, 1971)
Identity
Continually reconstructed multiplicity of one’s being grounded in the social and cultural constraints of their setting.
-Each person has multiple layers of identities
-Community can inform identity
-No one is a perfect representative of a community or culture (though there may be archetypes or stereotypes)

Cultural Ed. Outcomes
Exclusion
the way individuals or communities may passively or actively include select members, while disregarding others. (Brown-Jeffy & Cooper, 2011; Mantie & Tucker, 2012)
Legitimation
Non-dominant culture achieving recognition through achieving a coherent logic that pleases the dominant culture in a society. (Baumann, 2007)
-Symbolic capital defines what forms and uses of capital are recognized as legitimate bases of social positions in a given society. (Siisiäinen, 2000)
Colonialism
the hegemony that happens when one or more species populate an area. (Dirks, 1992)
After Colonialism
Outcomes of Community
Habitus
the product of history that produces understandings and practices. (Bourdieu, 1977; Mcknight & Chandler, 2012; Moore, 2004; Stuber, 2009)
Individual Identity
Community
Culture
Privilege
The unequal access to capital, rights, and social advantage due to certain physical, cognitive, or social characteristics:
Racism/Whiteness
(Hill, 2005; Koza, 2008; McKnight &Chandler, 2012)
Masculism
(Kova, 1993)
Classism
( McKnight &Chandler, 2012)
Ableism
(Hehir, 2001)
Heterosexualism
Occidentalism
(Prashad, 2007)
Cultural Pluralism
Things do not exist are oppositional binaries, instead, there are multiple ontological and epistemological approaches in the world. In order to navigate the complex web of existence, one must be able to consider the plurality of all options. (Mantie & Tucker, 2012)
Cultural Literacies
To become culturally competent mean that one understands the plurality of social life and can navigate and negotiate with others who approach life with different perspectives. (Emmanuel, 2005)
Consumptions/Production
Autoproduction
(Santoro, 2008): individuals create symbolic connections and meanings from cultural production when they “consume” them.

Pro-Am, Participatory Culture, Prosumer
(Leadbeater & Miller, 2004; Jenkins et al., 2011; Tepper and Ivey, 2008): Users generate their own content (less so than consuming), forming new communities around their creations and affiliations with a heavy connection to contemporary technology.

Omnivorousness
The liking, consuming, and understanding of a wide variety of cultural products. (Graham, 2009; Peterson, 2000; Sonnett, 2004)
The act of teaching informed by one’s background and teaching community. Spectrum of approaches (Abril, 2009).
Democratization of Culture
Civilizing others via imposing foreign culture on them, using the cultural products valued by the dominant (Gattinger, 2011).
Cultural Democracy
The valuing of cultural expression outside of the dominant mainstream, often those products of the educational community (Gattinger, 2011).
Culturally Relevant Pedagogy
Teaching practices and content that relate to the values and modes of communication/culturing of the community one teaches in. (Brown-Jeffy & Cooper, 2011; Emmanuel, 2005; Mantie & Tucker, 2012)
Culturally Conscious Pedagogy
Education practices and content that seeks to right inequity in access and privilege through so-called emancipatory work with students (Freire, 1970)
Often, to be "authentic" means to be legitimated and certified by dominant culture. A form of institutionalized cultural capital.
Authenticity
belief that different cultural products originate from, and belong to, a certain community. (Wang, 2009)
Often, to be "authentic" means to be legitimated and certified by dominant culture. A form of institutionalized cultural capital.
Bourdieu's (1986)
Forms of Capital
Economic
Cultural
Social
Embodied
Objectified
Institutionalized
Identity
Continually reconstructed multiplicity of one’s being grounded in the social and cultural constraints of their setting.
-Each person has multiple layers of identities
-Community can inform identity
-No one is a perfect representative of a community or culture (though there may be archetypes or stereotypes)

Tradition
Military
Economic
Political
Institutional
Ideological
Privilege
The unequal access to capital, rights, and social advantage due to certain physical, cognitive, or social characteristics:
Racism/Whiteness
(Hill, 2005) (Koza, 2008) )McKnight &Chandler, 2012)
Masculism
(Kova, 1993)
Classism
( McKnight &Chandler, 2012)
Ableism
(Hehir, 2001)
Heterosexualism
Occidentalism
(Prashad, 2007)
Community
Mechanisms of Community
Practices of Community
Misrecognition
Symbolic Violence
Processes and Associations of Colonialism
Mestizo & Castizo
Cosmopolitanism
Globalization
Orientalism
(Prashad, 2007)
Diaspora
(Hall, 1990; Brubaker, 2005)
Transnationalism
Postnationalism
Hybridity
Postcolonialism
Creolization
(Brubaker, 2005)
Homogenization
(Ishii, Shiobara, & Ishii, 2005)
Imperalism
(Mantie & Tucker, 2012)
Empire
(Sargeant, 2009)
(Brubaker, 2005) (Wang, 2009)
Mixture of multiple cultural products or process. (Cain, 2010)
the cultural legacy and practices of colonialism. (Mantie & Tucker 2012)
(Ishii, Shiobara, & Ishii, 2005)
Comfort in discussing many facets of culture. (Graham, 2009)
Agenda
Chosen ideological pathways and positions that one might take. These are more intentional and conscious. Informed by notions of:

The Right:
Individual liberty and autonomy (Mantie & Tucker, 2012)

The Good:
Normative and socially created conception of what is good for all or the “good life” (Mantie & Tucker, 2012)
Hegemony
The use, reproduction, and tolerance of an authority's power as it dominates complicit others. (Althusser, 1971)
Colonialism
the hegemony that happens when one or more species populate an area. (Dirks, 1992)
After Colonialism
Military
Economic
Political
Institutional
Ideological
Processes and Associations of Colonialism
Mestizo & Castizo
Cosmopolitanism
Globalization
Orientalism
(Prashad, 2007)
Diaspora
(Hall, 1990) (Brubaker, 2005)
Transnationalism
Postnationalism
Hybridity
Postcolonialism
Creolization
(Brubaker, 2005)
Homogenization
(Ishii, Shiobara, & Ishii, 2005)
Imperalism
(Mantie & Tucker, 2012)
Empire
(Sargeant, 2009)
(Brubaker, 2005) (Wang, 2009)
Mixture of multiple cultural products or process. (Cain, 2010)
the cultural legacy and practices of colonialism. (Mantie & Tucker 2012)
(Ishii, Shiobara, & Ishii, 2005)
Comfort in discussing many facets of culture. (Graham, 2009)
Bonding
Bridging
Tradition
as we learn about new aspects of the world, we associate the new ideas we encounter with ideas we already know
(wiggins)
“If we are what we do, and do repeatedly (Bowman, 2009), the kinds of music and
music making practices engaged which lead to becoming one kind of individual, community, and national identity, rather than another.”
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