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The Trojan War

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by

Grace Bollman

on 26 January 2015

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Transcript of The Trojan War

The Trojan War
Who's the fairest? Let's ask Paris.
Me! No, Me!
...is in its tenth and final year;
but how did it start?
Watch Troy Story
Once upon a time, around 1250 BC, toward the end of the Bronze Age in Greece, three goddesses were having an argument (said the Greeks). The goddesses Aphrodite, Athena, and Hera were arguing about which one of them was the most beautiful. They agreed to choose a human man and let him decide. More or less at random, the goddesses picked Paris, the youngest son of King Priam of Troy, to be their judge.
Each of the goddesses offered Paris a bribe to get him to vote for her. Athena offered him wisdom. Hera offered him power. But Aphrodite offered him the most beautiful woman in the world, and Paris voted for her.
Wowsy, Wow Wow!
She must be mine!
Menelaus and Helen welcomed Paris kindly, and gave him dinner and let him stay the night in their house. But during the night Paris convinced Helen to run away with him (because Aphrodite caused Helen to agree).
Hello, I Love You
He took her back to Troy with him and married her, even though she was already married to Menelaus.
So Aphrodite had to come through on her promise. She sent Paris to go visit the Greek king of Sparta, Menelaus.
Creative Commons License
CCSS. ELA.RI: 9.7 Reading for Information.
Analyze various accounts of a subject told in different mediums (e.g., a person’s life story in both print and multimedia), determining which details are emphasized in each account.
Assignment
Assignment: Students will view the Teacher Prezi introducing them to some background on the Trojan War. Then they will be creating their own group-prezi's based on short research done online. Their assignment is to compare and contrast two views of the war from http://ancienthistory.about.com/od/myths/tp/021909PivotalMythsandLegends.htm

The Trojan War Prezi by Grace Bollman is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.
Based on a work at prezi.com.
Permissions beyond the scope of this license may be available at http://nstitches2sew.blogspot.com/.
The Trojan War
Reading together and
watching a student
generated cartoon
Compare the written account of the war with the cartoon version
This sparked a ten year war on the shore of Troy. Odysseus soon devised a way to end the Trojan War -- the construction of a giant wooden horse made from one of their ships. This horse was filled with Achaeans (Greek men) to be left at the gates of Troy. The Trojans thought the giant horse was a peace (or sacrificial) offering from the Achaeans. Rejoicing, they opened the gates and led the horse into their city.
The Trojans brought out their equivalent of champagne; They feasted, drank hard, and fell asleep. During the night, the Achaeans stationed inside the horse, opened the trap door, crept down, opened the gates, and let in their countrymen who had only pretended to slip away.
No Horsing around!
The Achaeans then torched Troy, killing the men and taking the women prisoner. Helen, now older, but still a beauty, was reunited with her husband Menelaus. So ended the Trojan War and so began the Greeks’ most torturous, deadly trips home, some of which are told in The Odyssey, which is also attributed to Homer.
I Got my Baby Back!
Hera
Athena
Aphrodite
Full transcript