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Literary Devices

Metaphor, Simile, Personification
by

Alex Winninghoff

on 23 February 2012

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Transcript of Literary Devices

LITERARY DEVICES Personification Metaphor Simile Writing PROMPT 10/19 Dreams
by Langston Hughes

Hold fast to dreams
For if dreams die
Life is a broken-winged bird
That cannot fly.

Hold fast to dreams
For when dreams go
Life is a barren field
Frozen with snow.
Tools that an author uses
to enhance the readers
understanding To emphasize points
or pieces of the text To add richness and
meaning to their work Write a seven-line poem comparing your goals and dreams to at least two inanimate object (i.e., My dreams are like gas on a fire.) Describe why your dreams are like the inanimate object you choose. Learning TARGET Student will identify a literary devices in a narrative context To the evening star
by William Blake

Thou fair-hair'd angel of the evening,
Now, whilst the sun rests on the mountains, light
Thy bright torch of love; thy radiant crown
Put on, and smile upon our evening bed!
Smile on our loves, and while thou drawest the
Blue curtains of the sky, scatter thy silver dew
On every flower that shuts its sweet eyes
In timely sleep. Let thy west wind sleep on
The lake; speak silence with thy glimmering eyes,
And wash the dusk with silver. Soon, full soon,
Dost thou withdraw; then the wolf rages wide,
And the lion glares thro' the dun forest:
The fleeces of our flocks are cover'd with
Thy sacred dew: protect them with thine influence. Digging by Seamus heaney

Between my finger and my thumb
The squat pen rests; as snug as a gun.

Under my window a clean rasping sound
When the spade sinks into gravelly ground:
My father, digging. I look down

Till his straining rump among the flowerbeds
Bends low, comes up twenty years away
Stooping in rhythm through potato drills
Where he was digging.

The coarse boot nestled on the lug, the shaft
Against the inside knee was levered firmly.
He rooted out tall tops, buried the bright edge deep
To scatter new potatoes that we picked
Loving their cool hardness in our hands.




By God, the old man could handle a spade, Just like his old man.

My grandfather could cut more turf in a day
Than any other man on Toner's bog.
Once I carried him milk in a bottle
Corked sloppily with paper. He straightened up
To drink it, then fell to right away
Nicking and slicing neatly, heaving sods
Over his shoulder, digging down and down
For the good turf. Digging.

The cold smell of potato mold, the squelch and slap
Of soggy peat, the curt cuts of an edge
Through living roots awaken in my head.
But I've no spade to follow men like them.

Between my finger and my thumb
The squat pen rests.
I'll dig with it.
A figure of speech that is an explicit comparison between two things. A figure of speech which gives inanimate object or abstract ideas human qualities or abilities. A figure of speech in which a comparison is made between two unlike things that have something in common. Unlike a simile, a metaphor does not use "like" or "as" to make the comparison.
"This Bouquet" by Ani DiFranco

Got a garden of songs where I grow all my thoughts
wish I could harvest one or two for some small talk.
Seems like i'm starving for words whenever you're around.
Nothing on my tongue, and so much in my ground.
Nothing on my tongue, and so much in my ground.

Half the time I got my gaze trained on your motel door
fourth door from the end.
Rest of the time my gaze lays like a stain on the carpeted floor.
If it weren't for my brain I'd go over and make friends
too bad about my brain 'cause I'd like to make friends.

See the little song bird unable to make a sound,
even though she follows her words from town to town.
We both got gardens of songs; maybe it's okay
that i am speechless because I picked you this bouquet.
Yep, sure am speechless, but Ipicked you this bouquet.
HSPE! Take a minute,
clean up and complete your notes and pack up IDENTIFY THE AUTHOR'S
USE OF PERSONIFICATION,
SIMILE AND METAPHOR ASSESSMENT
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