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Julius Caesar Mean Girls Comparison

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Holly Benna

on 7 May 2015

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Transcript of Julius Caesar Mean Girls Comparison

MEAN GIRLS and JULIUS CAESAR COMPARISON
In this primary example in
Mean Girls
, we see Gretchen Wieners compare her current situation Brutus' and express her frustration in English class. It gives us a very clear understanding of what she thinks of Regina. It shows that she believes it's not "Okay for one person to be the boss of everybody" (Gretchen Wieners)
Jealousy and manipulation are dominant themes in Mean Girls, a movie directed by Mark Waters. The theme plays a major role in defining many of the characters. Throughout the movie, the protagonist Cady Heron, is especially impacted by the power of jealousy. Since being homeschooled in Africa then moving to public high school in Illinois she is drawn into a web of jealousy and conspiracy as an ally with Janis and Damian. They convince her to pretend to be friends with the plastics in order to “destroy” (Janis Ian) Regina George, so that the students stop thinking of her as royalty. Gretchen Wieners is a member of North Shore High’s ruling clique called “the plastics” along with Regina George, and Karen Smith. “She [knows] it [is] was better to be in The Plastics, hating life, than to not be in at all” (Cady Heron). Gretchen looks up to Regina as a friend, but becomes aware of Regina’s manipulative ways when Cady becomes closer to Regina. Gretchen gets cast aside, making her extremely jealous. Cady and her friends are determined to destroy the plastics clique. The result is that Gretchen exposes Regina’s weaknesses and she becomes damaged. The fall of Regina is a result of the conspiracy by Cady, Janis, and Damian but it wouldn’t have been possible without Gretchen’s betrayal of Regina, due to her jealousy.


Jealousy and manipulation are the underlying themes in Julius Caesar, a play by William Shakespeare. Jealousy is the reason Cassius, and many of the senators conspire against Julius Caesar. Cassius believes that “a man of such a feeble temper” (I,ii, 129) should not hold such extreme power over the people. He wants that power for himself. Cassius is so jealous and determined to eliminate Caesar that he manipulates Brutus into joining his plot. Cassius knows the only way to convince the plebeians to agree with him that Caesar is corrupt, is by convincing Brutus, a friend of Caesar, to ally with him. Cassius goes to desperate lengths to convince Brutus of Caesar’s lack of humility, and single minded desire for power. He manipulates Brutus by comparing him to Caesar, saying “ Why should that name [Caesar] be sounded more than yours?” (I,ii,144). He hopes to spark a desire for power in Brutus, making him jealous of Caesar. Brutus is conflicted between his love for his friend, Caesar, and his devotion to the good of his country. Cassius needs Brutus as an ally and finds success by throwing letters through his window that appear to be from citizens holding Brutus in high esteem and reflecting poorly on Caesar. Upon receiving the letters Brutus is deceived and manipulated and determines to join the Conspirators. The letters from Cassius provide Brutus with the justification to betray his friend. Caesar is in a position of extreme power and Cassius is envious. In his jealousy he conspires with the senators but can not overthrow Caesar without the help of Brutus. Brutus is a noble man and ends up deceived and manipulated into fulfilling Cassius’ ambitious plan. The themes of jealousy and manipulation are displayed in these characters interactions.
Mean Girls and Julius Caesar have many similarities within the character's expressions of jealousy and manipulation. Regina and Caesar are power hungry & dominant and cause the people around them to be jealous and manipulative to gain their own power.
In Mean Girls, Regina George, of the plastics, holds similar power over the school as Julius Caesar holds over Rome. They are both often referred to as “an evil dictator” (Janis Ian). Aaron Samuels, Regina’s ex-boyfriend, is the object of both Regina, and Cady’s desire, as power over Rome is the object of Caesar and Cassius’ desire. Julius Caesar and the senators have control over Rome, and decide what is acceptable in Roman society, and what is not, while Regina George and the plastics dictate what is popular within their school. The conspirators manipulate Brutus into being an ally in the overthrow of Caesar like Cady, Janis and Damian use Gretchen’s jealousy to turn her against Regina. Although the conspirators did most of the plotting, they wouldn’t have been able to succeed without the help of Brutus and Gretchen. The Mean Girl conspirators take advantage of Gretchen's jealousy to disintegrate the plastics clique, causing her demise. “Regina would be nothing without…her army of skanks”(Janis Ian), similar to how Caesar would be nothing without the support of the senators, and the citizens of Rome. Regina and Caesar’s fatal flaw is that they cause their supporters and friends to become jealous thus resulting in their downfall. The conspirators and those manipulated by them also suffer because of the spirit of jealousy and desire for power.
Although there are many similarities between Mean Girls and Julius Caesar, there are key differences in the characters motivations. Regina pursues Aaron as Caesar pursues Rome but the difference between their true natures are revealed in their motives. Regina only wants to be with Aaron because Cady has feelings for him. Cady, Janis and Damian want to destroy Regina because of “How mean she really is,” (Gretchen Wieners) not because they are jealous of her power. Julius Caesar, on the other hand was not killed for something he did to intentionally hurt someone else, but because of the senators’ jealousy, and their desire for personal gain. Cassius says that his reason for eliminating Caesar is that he is becoming a “”tyrant” (I,iii,110) but the fact that Caesar refused the crown offered by Mark Antony “thrice”(I,ii,240), shows the true nature of Caesar is not corrupt nor power hungry. The reason that Caesar is killed by the senators is simply because of the senators jealousy that Caesar was even offered a crown at all. Brutus joined the conspirators plot because of his love for Rome, but he doesn’t actually want to kill Caesar, while Gretchen is extremely jealous of Regina, and wants to take action against her. She lets her jealousy get in the way of her friendship with Regina.

Jealousy and Manipulation in Mean Girls

Jealousy and Manipulation in Julius Caesar
Similarities Between Julius Caesar and Mean Girls
The themes of jealousy and manipulation are recurring ideas in politics, even high school politics and have remained prevalent over time.
Bibliography
Differences Between Julius Caesar and Mean Girls
Girls Gone Wild
Regina = Antony. She manipulates, and brings chaos to the school (Plebeians) by revenging the plastics (conspirators) with the burn book (Caesar's will)
Et Tu, Brute?
Jealousy In Mean Girls
Jealousy and manipulation are dominant themes in Mean Girls, a movie directed by Mark Waters. Throughout the movie, the protagonist Cady Heron, is especially impacted by the power of jealousy. At school she is drawn into a web of jealousy and conspiracy as an ally with Janis and Damian. They convince her to pretend to be friends with the plastics in order to “destroy” (Janis Ian) Regina George, so that the students stop thinking of her as royalty. Gretchen Wieners is a member of North Shore High’s ruling clique called “the plastics” along with Regina George, and Karen Smith. Gretchen becomes aware of Regina’s manipulative ways when Cady becomes closer to Regina. Gretchen gets cast aside, making her extremely jealous.
Cady and her friends are determined to destroy the plastics clique. Gretchen exposes Regina’s weaknesses. The fall of Regina is a result of the conspiracy by Cady, Janis, and Damian but it wouldn’t have been possible without Gretchen’s betrayal of Regina, due to her jealousy.

Jealousy in Julius Caesar
Jealousy and manipulation are the underlying themes in Julius Caesar, a play by William Shakespeare. Jealousy is the reason Cassius, and many of the senators conspire against Julius Caesar. Cassius is jealous of Caesar's power and determined to eliminate him. He knows the only way to convince the plebeians to agree with him that Caesar is corrupt, is by convincing Brutus, a friend of Caesar, to ally with him. Cassius manipulates Brutus by comparing him to Caesar, saying “ Why should that name [Caesar] be sounded more than yours?” (I,ii,144). He hopes to spark a desire for power in Brutus, making him jealous of Caesar. Brutus is conflicted between his love for his friend, Caesar, and his devotion to the good of his country. Cassius needs Brutus as an ally and finds success by throwing letters through his window that appear to be from citizens holding Brutus in high esteem and reflecting poorly on Caesar. The letters from Cassius provide Brutus with the justification to betray his friend. Caesar is in a position of extreme power and Cassius is envious. In his jealousy he conspires with the senators but can not overthrow Caesar without the help of Brutus. Brutus is a noble man and ends up deceived and manipulated into fulfilling Cassius’ ambitious plan.
Mean Girls and Julius Caesar have many similarities within the characters expressions of jealousy and manipulation. Regina and Caesar are power hungry & dominant and cause the people around them to be jealous and manipulative to gain their own power.

In Mean Girls, Regina George, of the plastics, holds similar power over the school as Julius Caesar holds over Rome. They are both referred to as “an evil dictator” (Janis Ian).

Aaron Samuels, Regina’s ex-boyfriend, is the object of both Regina, and Cady’s desire, as power over Rome is the object of Caesar and Cassius’ desire.

Julius Caesar and the senators have control over Rome, and decide what is acceptable in Roman society, and what is not, while Regina George and the plastics dictate what is popular within their school.

The conspirators manipulate Brutus into being an ally in the overthrow of Caesar like Cady, Janis and Damian use Gretchen’s jealousy to turn her against Regina. Although the conspirators did most of the plotting, they wouldn’t have been able to succeed without the help of Brutus and Gretchen. The Mean Girl conspirators take advantage of Gretchen's jealousy to disintegrate the plastics clique, causing her demise. “Regina would be nothing without…her army of skanks”(Janis Ian), similar to how Caesar would be nothing without the support of the senators, and the citizens of Rome.

Regina and Caesar’s fatal flaw is that they cause their supporters and friends to become jealous thus resulting in their downfall. The conspirators and those manipulated by them also suffer because of the spirit of jealousy and desire for power.


Although there are many similarities between Mean Girls and Julius Caesar, there are key differences in the characters motivations.

Regina pursues Aaron as Caesar pursues Rome but the difference between their true natures are revealed in their motives. Regina only wants to be with Aaron because Cady has feelings for him.

Cady, Janis and Damian want to destroy Regina because of “How mean she really is,” (Gretchen Wieners) not because they are jealous of her power. Julius Caesar, on the other hand is not killed for something he did to intentionally hurt someone else, but because of the senators’ jealousy, and their desire for personal gain. Cassius says that his reason for eliminating Caesar is that he is becoming a “”tyrant” (I,iii,110) but the fact that Caesar refuses the crown offered by Mark Antony “thrice”(I,ii,240), shows the true nature of Caesar is not corrupt nor power hungry. The reason that Caesar is killed by the senators is simply because of the senators jealousy that Caesar was even offered a crown at all.

Brutus joins the conspirators plot because of his love for Rome, but he doesn’t actually want to kill Caesar, while Gretchen is extremely jealous of Regina, and wants to take action against her. She lets her jealousy get in the way of her friendship with Regina.

https://www.pinterest.com/knife816/mean-girls/

http://pixshark.com/marcus-brutus-in-julius-caesar.htm

https://www.pinterest.com/danielleecarson/julius-caesar/

https://ehistory.osu.edu/biographies/gaius-julius-Caesar

"Mean Girls (4/10) Movie CLIP - Such a Good Friend (2004) HD." YouTube.

YouTube. Web. 6 May 2015.

"Gaius Julius Caesar." Gaius Julius Caesar. Web. 6 May 2015. . https://ehistory.osu.edu/biographies/gaius-julius-Caesar

"Mean Girls (7/10) Movie CLIP - Girls Gone Wild! (2004) HD." YouTube. YouTube. Web. 6 May 2015.

Mean Girls, Paramount, 2004. Film

http://carboncostume.com/regina-george/

http://responsestoshakespeare.blogspot.ca/2011/04/mean-girls-julius-caesar.html

Shakespeare, William. The Tragedy of Julius Caesar with Related Readings. Albany: ITP International Thomson Pub., 1997. Print.

http://www.sparknotes.com/shakespeare/juliuscaesar/

http://memegenerator.net/instance/58132963

"Mean Girls (7/10) Movie CLIP - Girls Gone Wild! (2004) HD." YouTube. YouTube. Web. 6 May 2015

"Mean Girls (4/10) Movie CLIP - Such a Good Friend (2004) HD." YouTube.
YouTube. Web. 6 May 2015.
Similarities
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By Holly Benna and Ghazal Jafari (2-4)
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