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SDR vs TRADITIONAL COMPOSITE BY AMIRA MOHAMED EID

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amira mohamed eid

on 22 April 2014

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Transcript of SDR vs TRADITIONAL COMPOSITE BY AMIRA MOHAMED EID


INTRODUCTION:
Microleakage:
is the clinically undetectable passage of bacteria, fluids, molecules and ions between the cavity wall and the restorative material and is considered to be a major factor influencing the longevity of dental restorations.

The decrease of the polymerization shrinkage and consequent microleakage, can be obtained by
an oblique layering technique with increments
or design cavities with a low C-factor[1,6].
On the other hand, some changes in restorative materials, made in the past,
like improvements in the filler technology and formulation of composite materials
, have improved performance of the resins[8,9,12] .

AIM:
Evaluation of marginal microleakage of bulkfill composite (SDR) and traditional (incremental) composite using GAMMA camera.
INTRODUCTION:
A novel resin composite system,
SDR
was recently introduced in the market. Is indicated for use as a bulk fill posterior composite restorations and can be bulk filled in layers up to
4
mm in depth
due to reduced polymerization shrinkage
. SDR incorporates a hi
ghly-filled proprietary resin with special modifiers enabling quick placement and precise adaptation to the cavity walls reducing

Microleakage
The specimens were stored in distilled water at 37˚C for one week and after thermocycling 500 cycles between 5˚C and 55˚C with a dwell time of 30 seconds

evaluation of microleakage of

bulkfill

composite (SDR) with
TRADITIONAL
composite

BY

GAMMA CAMERA
An in vitro experiment.

GAMMA TEAM
AMIRA MOHAMED Eid
AHMED ATTALLAH
OSSAMA KHAIRY
INTRODUCTION:
MATERIALS and METHODS:
incremental Light cured hybrid composite (te-econom plus) was used to restore the class 1 cavities of 5 specimens.
10 noncarious extracted human lower 7 molars extracted for periodontal reasons and free from cracks were hand scaled.
Class 1 cavities were prepared on the osslusal surface of each tooth.
a (SDR) bulk fill flowable composite (densply) was used to restore the class 1 cavities of 5 specimens
.
The specimens were divided randomly in
The cavity was conditioned for 30 seconds with 37% phosphoric acid
gel
(eco-etch)
, washed immediately after with an air/water jet for 30 seconds.
(te-econom_BOND)
was applied to the enamel/- dentin using a light brushing motion, dried with gentle air flow and light cured for 10 seconds using light cure. composite was placed followed by shaping the occlusal surface and light curing for 30sec as manufacturer described using
(LED curing ligh)
. Restorations were polished

INTRODUCTION:
Resin composites, introduced in the 1960s[1,2] , satisfied aesthetic needs, and nowadays they represent a class of materials widely used in restorative dentistry[3]
INTRODUCTION:
the main shortcomings of composite resin materials are:

polymerization shrinkage
and
polymerization stress
[1-8-5]_shrinkage stress resulting in

internal microcracks within the bulk of the material[7]
separation of the bonding agent from the cavity wall with resultant
gap formation
,
marginal microleakage
and
post-operative sensitivity[1, 3,7-9]
enamel
microcracks[5,7]
;
marginal staining
;
wear[8]; discoloration[9]
;
lower fracture resistance[1,5, 9]
;
recurrent caries[1,3,8,9]
; and
deformation of tooth[5,7]
.
Resin composites should fulfil a lot of basic requirements:

good optical characteristics

physical properties
should correspond to those of dental hard tissue in terms of
wear resistance
they should be
distinguishable from dental tissue on x-ray
easy to handle and polish

they should be

tasteless
and
biocompatible

should form

a sufficient bond with dental tissue or at least with the dental adhesive[4]
.
..However, many clinical and material limitations have restricted the universal use of resin composites as posterior restorative material[1].
in our study we will use radioactive isotopes method (Technetium)[14]
. The cavity had 4 mm in depth.
MATERIALS and METHOD:
results:
results :
10 human extracted molars
burs 245, finshing bur, polishing bur, scaler
high speed hand piece
low speed hand piece
composite ... SDR
(dentsply)
_traditional.c
(te-conom-plus)
Ivoclar Vivadent
nail varnish
Technetium
GAMMA camera
results:
MATERIALS and METHOD:
MATERIALS and METHOD:
The specimens of groups 1and 2 were covered with two layers of white nail varnish up to 2 mm from the margins around the restorations In order to prevent the infiltration of the isotope, material .
results :
results:
results:
Both composite materials tested presented microleakage. However, more microleakage occurred in group 2.
Between group 1 group 2 a highly significant difference was found.. Analysing the mean and standard deviation reveals that group 1 presented the lowest values, while group 2 showed the highest values.
When analysing the results, a statistically significant difference was observed between group 1 and group 2
tabels
EBAA MOUSTAFA
GAMMA CAMERA :
There are several methods by which microleakage can be studied such as the use of dyes, chemical tracers, radioactive isotopes, artificial caries, scanning electron microscopy, neutron activation analysis, and electrical conductivity[11,35]
In this study the
(Technetium)
was used due to the fact that:

this is

the most widely use in the field of nuclear medicine
,
This radionuclide was selected as it is
the most used of cold kits in the field of nuclear medicine
for single photon emission,
in addition to the fact of

its half-decay time being approximately 6 hours.
The immersion time of the teeth in the solution of sodium pertechnetate was
set a3 hours
in order to have time for the foregoing procedures to measure theradiation by gamma camera.

INTRODUCTION:
Within the limitations of this study, it can be concluded that:
1- SD bulk filled composite provided better sealing with more simplified clinical application procedure.

2-Using the radioisotope 99mTc as a marker of infiltration is simple, quick and fulfils the objective of a quantitative method in the evaluation of microleakage

3-Advantage of using gamma camera :
Doctors can look at specific parts of the body.
Allows clear images of organs to be built up.
Some modern gamma cameras have more than one crystal; which allows for 3D images of organs
CONCLUSIONS:
GROUP 1
GROUP 2
AIM:
MATERIALS and METHOD:
CONCLUSION
DR : NASHAAT LOUTFY
(Consultant of oncology and nuclear medicine consultant treating thyroid Faculty of Medicine - Alexandria University)
SRECIAL THANXS TO :
Prof. Amal Ezzeldin
Dental Biomaterials Dept Alexandria University
MOHAMED WAHBA
( technician at Rashid Center for treatment of tumors)
شف
The cavity was conditioned for 30 seconds with 37% phosphoric acid
(eco_etch)
(te-econom_BOND)

was applied to the enamel/- dentin using a light brushing motion
dried with gentle air flow and light cured for 10 seconds using light cure.
incremental tech.
bulkfill tech.
SDR befor shaping and curing
finishing and polishing after curing
we found that :

uptake with SDR =
0.01%
uptake within traditional=

0.59%
we can say that :
uptak in traditional composite =~ 50 uptak in SDR
light curing for 30sec as manufacturer described using

(LED curing ligh)
the method we used in this study is
radioactive isotopes
.
it is One of the objective methods for microleakage rating is the using
Technetium

Technetium
is
an artificial element,
obtained by the radioactive decay molibdenium, which is a radioactive metallic element belonging to the transition metals with an atomic radius of 135.8 pm.
It is element 43 of the periodic table, and the radioactive element with the lowest atomic number.
This presents a half-life of 2.6 hours.
Its decay occurs by the isometric transition and emission and 140.5 keV of gamma radiation[14].
MATERIALS and METHOD:
MATERIALS and METHOD:
Technetium

(1) Radhika, M., Sajjan, G., Kumaraswamy, B. and Mittal, N. (2010) Effect of different placement techniques on marginal microleakage of deep class-II cavities restored with two composite resin formulations. Journal of Conservative Dentistry, 13, 9-15.doi:10.4103/0972-0707.62633
(2) Ben-Amar, A., Slutzky, H. and Matalon, S. (2007) The influence of 2 condensation techniques on the marginal seal of packable resin composite restorations. Quintessence International, 38, 423-428.
(3) Schneider, L., Cavalcante, L. and Silikas, N. (2010) Shrinkage stresses generated during resin-composite applications: A review. Journal of Dental Biomechanics, 2010, 1-14.
(4) Zimmerli, B., Strub, M., Jeger, F., Stadler, O. and Lussi, A. (2010) Composite materials: Composition, properties and clinical applications. Schweiz Monatsschr Zahnmed, 120, 972-979.

(1) Radhika, M., Sajjan, G., Kumaraswamy, B. and Mittal, N. (2010) Effect of different placement techniques on marginal microleakage of deep class-II cavities restored with two composite resin formulations. Journal of Conservative Dentistry, 13, 9-15.doi:10.4103/0972-0707.62633
(3) Schneider, L., Cavalcante, L. and Silikas, N. (2010) Shrinkage stresses generated during resin-composite applications: A review. Journal of Dental Biomechanics, 2010, 1-14.
(4) Zimmerli, B., Strub, M., Jeger, F., Stadler, O. and Lussi, A. (2010) Composite materials: Composition, properties and clinical applications. Schweiz Monatsschr Zahnmed, 120, 972-979.
(5) Vyver, P. (2000) Clinical application of a new flowable base material for direct and indirect restorations. International Dentistry, 12, 18-27.
(7) Burke, F., Crisp, R., James, A., Mackenzie, L., Pal, A., Sands, P., et al. (2011) Two year clinical evaluation of a low-shrink resin composite material in UK general dental practices. Dental Materials, 27, 622-630. doi:10.1016/j.dental.2011.02.012
(8) Mahmound, S. and Al-Wakeel, E. (2011) Marginal adaptation of ormocer-, silorane-, and methacrylate-based composite restorative systems bonded to dentin cavities after water storage. Quintessence International, 42, e131-e139.
(9) Hickel, R. and Manhart, J. (2001) Longevity of restorations in posterior teeth and reasons for failure. Journal of Adhesive Dentistry, 3, 45-64.
(14) U. Mazzi, “Techenetium in Medicine,” In: Zolle, I., Ed., Technetium-99m pharmaceuticals: Preparation and quality control in nuclear medicine. Springer, Berlin, 2007.

(5) Radhika, M., Sajjan, G., Kumaraswamy, B. and Mittal, N. (2010) Effect of different placement techniques on marginal microleakage of deep class-II cavities restored with two composite resin formulations. Journal of Conservative Dentistry, 13, 9-15.doi:10.4103/0972-0707.62633
(7) Helvatjoglu-Antoniades, M., Kalinderis, K., Pedulu, L. and Papadogiannis, Y. (2004) The effect of pulse activetion on microleakage of a “packable” composite resin
(8) Mahmound, S. and Al-Wakeel, E. (2011) Marginal adaptation of ormocer-, silorane-, and methacrylate-based composite restorative systems bonded to dentin cavities after water storage. Quintessence International, 42, e131-e139.
(11) Hickel, R. and Manhart, J. (2001) Longevity of restorations in posterior teeth and reasons for failure. Journal of Adhesive Dentistry, 3, 45-64.
(12) Ernst, C.P., Brandenbusch, M., Meyer, G., Canbek, K., Gottschalk, F. and Willershausen, B. (2006) Two-year clinical performance of a nanofillervs a fine-particle hybrid resin composite. Clinical Oral Investigations, 10, 119-125. doi:10.1007/s00784-006-0041-8

(11) Gogna, R., Jagadis, S. and Shashikal, K. (2011) A comparative in vitro study of microleakage by a radioactive isotope and compressive strength of three nanofilled composite resin restorations. Journal of Conservative Dentistry, 14, 128-131.doi:10.4103/0972-0707.82609
(14) U. Mazzi, “Techenetium in Medicine,” In: Zolle, I., Ed., Technetium-99m pharmaceuticals: Preparation and quality control in nuclear medicine. Springer, Berlin, 2007.
(35) Ferreira, M., Botelho, M., Abrantes, M., Oliveiros, B. and Carrilho, E. (2010) Quantitative scintigraphic analysis of pulp revascularization in autotransplanted teeth in dogs. Archives of Oral Biology, 55, 825-829. doi:10.1016/j.archoralbio.2010.07.005

Amalgam was for years the most often used restorative material by dentists. Due to aesthetic reasons, environmental and questionable biocompatibility of alloys that contain mercury, practitioners needed to seek a new material that would satisfy these needs. Resin composites, introduced in the 1960s [1,2] , satisfied aesthetic needs, and nowadays they represent a class of materials widely used in restorative dentistry [3]

(1) Radhika, M., Sajjan, G., Kumaraswamy, B. and Mittal, N. (2010) Effect of different placement techniques on marginal microleakage of deep class-II cavities restored with two composite resin formulations. Journal of Conservative Dentistry, 13, 9-15.doi:10.4103/0972-0707.62633
(2) Ben-Amar, A., Slutzky, H. and Matalon, S. (2007) The influence of 2 condensation techniques on the marginal seal of packable resin composite restorations. Quintessence International, 38, 423-428.
(3) Schneider, L., Cavalcante, L. and Silikas, N. (2010) Shrinkage stresses generated during resin-composite applications: A review. Journal of Dental Biomechanics, 2010, 1-14.

(11) Gogna, R., Jagadis, S. and Shashikal, K. (2011) A comparative in vitro study of microleakage by a radioactive isotope and compressive strength of three nanofilled composite resin restorations. Journal of Conservative Dentistry, 14, 128-131.doi:10.4103/0972-0707.82609
(14) U. Mazzi, “Techenetium in Medicine,” In: Zolle, I., Ed., Technetium-99m pharmaceuticals: Preparation and quality control in nuclear medicine. Springer, Berlin, 2007.
(35) Ferreira, M., Botelho, M., Abrantes, M., Oliveiros, B. and Carrilho, E. (2010) Quantitative scintigraphic analysis of pulp revascularization in autotransplanted teeth in dogs. Archives of Oral Biology, 55, 825-829. doi:10.1016/j.archoralbio.2010.07.005
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