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Whole or Strand Discussion

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Chad Ransom

on 10 February 2017

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Transcript of Whole or Strand Discussion

Whole or Strand?
TCSD
Other Tangential Topics
Dual Immersion Data and Program Review
Dual Immersion Selection Process
What is dual immersion?

Who is dual immersion for?
Read This First
Links for more information
Click on the icon for the proposed school boundaries
Click here for student enrollment projections

Models
Whole School Model
Overview:
The models below are what JES, CES, and MMES would look like with either a whole school or strand model.
They were built projecting future student enrollment based on current Kindergarten class size and Teton County birth rates.
"T" represents "Traditional Classrooms" and "D" represents "Dual Immersion Classrooms"
Details:
Click on the icon for more detail
Strand Model
The models are not specific to JES, CES, or MMES and simply show the structural difference between the two models.
The whole school model allows the district to "funnel" classes at the 4th and 5th grade, saving staff positions. This is not possible in the strand model.
Click on the icon for more detail
Possible Options
Option 1
--Whole School Model with continued expansion of the dual immersion program.
In the spring of 2016, the school board voted to expand the dual immersion program from 4 classes to 6 classes. Currently Kindergarten and 1st grade have that number of classes.
Option 2
--Strand Model in all 3 schools
Each school would have one strand of dual immersion (2 classes) and one strand of traditional classes.
Option 3
--Whole School Model with no expansion of the dual immersion program
Either JES, CES, or MMES would be selected as the dual immersion cite and the program would return to 4 classes per grade
Option 4
--Strand Model for JES and CES; MMES would have a Whole School Traditional Model
Option 1
--this option was discarded, because it would require the continued use of modulars and the two traditional schools would open approximately 50% empty.
Option 2 & 3
--are the options examined by the study group and presented throughout this Prezi.
Option 4
--was not examined by the study group, but is generally similar to option 2, with the exception that it would eliminate families in the MMES boundary from participation in the dual immersion program.
Click on the icon for more detail
Click here for the district strategic plan
Financial Impact
Quick Summary
:
There are differences between strands and the whole school model regarding finances.
These differences mainly lie in the area of staffing and transportation.
Current estimates for staffing indicate that a whole school model will require at least 7.5 less teachers than a strand model. This equates to approximately $750,000 per year in savings. (see bottom right for cost savings each year)
Current estimates for transportation indicate between a $140,000-$350,000 savings regardless of which model is chosen. (see "Transportation" frame for more information)
There are minimal differences between material costs and other areas.
This equates to an annual savings of approximately $590,000-$800,000 per year for the whole school model compared with current costs.
Click on the icon for more detail
.
Quick Summary:
Transportation costs are difficult to project as there are many moving variables (exact school boundaries for different models, future student locations, decision to increase walking radius, etc.)
There are other considerations to transportation beyond just cost, including time on bus and overall impact to the community.
ALL OPTIONS
being examined are a
NET REDUCTION
in the current cost of transportation.
Most of the cost savings come from the decision to increase the walking radius of the schools and not whether there is a whole school or strand model.
Links for more information
Program Efficiency
Quick Summary:
Initial estimates are that there would be minimal difference between strands and whole school model related to materials. There would be some additional cost to the strand model, because of the need to have materials for both dual immersion and traditional classrooms in all schools.
There is the potential for some additional cost or loss of efficiency for program staffing in the strand model. Having both program models in all schools requires that supplemental services (ie reading interventions) that support both types of programs be offered in all schools.
Links for more information
Transportation
Effective & Efficient Operations
Safe, Healthy, & Caring Environment
Success for All
.
Informed & Engaged Community
School Demographics
.
Quick Summary:
School demographics were a very important factor for many of the people on the study team.
There is a significant difference in the ethnicity and free & reduced lunch demographics between the whole school and strand options, as well as between the different possible locations of the dual immersion school in the whole school model
Click here for the current demographic breakdown between schools
Click here for the projected breakdowns based on each option
Links for more information
School Culture
Quick Summary:
School culture is an important part of student achievement. A cohesive school culture has been found to positively impact student achievement.
Having two different program models within the same school requires a significant separation of those models to meet student achievement targets. In most cases, programs in this configuration operate as "schools-within-a-school."
Links for more information
Modulars
.
Quick Summary:
Eliminating overcrowding and the use of modulars as classrooms is a key priority of the school board and the basis for state funding of the new elementary school.
All of the options considered eliminate the use of modulars.
Links for more information
Access to Programs
.
Click on the icon for more detail
Links for more information
Quick Summary:
Overall there is no significant difference in access to supplemental programs between the strand and whole school models. Students would have similar access to Title I reading, PEAK, ESL, SPED, and other services.
There is a large difference in how many students could be in the dual immersion program.
One whole school ~384 students
Strands in each school ~576 students
The district could still decide to expand the program at a future date.
The whole school model also affords the district the opportunity to use saved staffing positions to add more Spanish time for students in traditional programs, if desired.
Language Proficiency
.
Quick Summary:
Although difficult to quantify, anecdotal information from other districts indicate that dual immersion students in a whole school model acquire more Spanish than in a strand model.
There would be no difference in Spanish proficiency for students in the traditional program, unless saved staffing was used to increase the amount of time for Spanish in the whole school model.
Double click on the icon for more detail
Links for more information
Curriculum & Instruction
.
Quick Summary:
The study group considered the differences between instructional models, common curriculum, professional development, and teacher collaboration.
In each case, the whole school model was preferred to the strand model, because it allowed teachers and principals to better focus and collaborate around best teaching practices and curriculum.
For example, the use of Professional Learning Communities to facilitate teacher collaboration around best practice and curriculum is strongly supported in the research. However, it is much more difficult to collaborate when half of each grade is teaching a different model of instruction with different curriculum.
In effect, teachers in a strand model would work in teams of two or even by themselves.
It is important to note that the quality of instruction and the use of a guaranteed and viable curriculum are two of the strongest predictors of student success.
Links for more information
Can we even have a strand of dual immersion at MMES?
Visual if applicable
Quick Summary:
Although there are not enough native Spanish-speakers in the MMES boundary, the district could still opt for a "one-way immersion" program. This program model does not have native speakers of the foreign language in the program. This would be similar to the Mandarin program offered in Casper.
There are two significant drawbacks to this type of model when compared with a "two-way immersion" model (what we have now).
Less native Spanish-speakers would have access to the program. We know this model is most effective at helping those students be successful academically in English and close the achievement gap.
Native English-speakers learn less Spanish over the course of the program, because they are not exposed to as much Spanish language use.
Click on the icon for more detail
Links for more information
Which option allows my child to attend school with his/her peers?
.
Quick Summary:
None of the options being reviewed allow students to attend school with all of their same-age peers.
Currently students in the "town" area attend school with all their same-age peers. Once MMES opens, students will attend with only 1/3 of their same-age peers. (1/3 JES, 1/3 CES, 1/3 MMES).
In a whole school model, students would be mixed from year to year with all their peers at that grade level. In a strand model, students would only be mixed with 1/2 of their peers. In this model, they would be in classes with only 1/6 of their current same-age peers from K-5th grade (~32 total students).
Click on the icon for more detail
Links for more information
What is a "neighborhood" school?
.
Quick Summary:
As part of the study team's work, they brainstormed what "neighborhood" school really meant:
Close to student homes; within walking distance or short bus ride
Strong connections with parents, kids, and teachers
A group of students who stay in school together from grade to grade
Siblings at the same school
Common identity; developed climate/culture
Research shows academic and social benefits of having students in the same building for longer periods of time and in creating strong school-family-community partnerships. However, that is not specific to a geographic location.
Links for more information
Public & staff input submitted to the board to date
Past Board Presentations

Study Group Work
Survey Results
Having 16:1 class sizes for 4 classes, means that each grade would be approximately 64 students. In a whole school model, where all students are in the same program, those classes can be combined into 3 classes of 21 students. This matches the current state funding model. However, for schools with two different strands, classes cannot be combined, because there are 32 students from each program at each grade. Those students could not be combined with each other for class and 32 is way too many to have in one classroom.
Funneling
16:1
16:1
16:1
16:1
21:1
21:1
21:1
= 64 = students
&
4 teachers
Currently almost 1/3 of dual immersion students live in the proposed boundaries for MMES. If dual immersion was not offered at MMES, there are two possible options.
A. Allow students from MMES boundary to stay in the program and either be transported or find their own transportation to CES or JES.
B. Eliminate students from MMES boundary from the dual immersion program.
Option 4 - No Dual Immersion at MMES
Option A
Since historically we consistently have about 1/3 of dual immersion students live in the MMES boundary, we can assume that would continue into the future. If that was the case, then MMES would open at less than 50% capacity and remain that way for the foreseeable future. This also means that either JES or CES would need to keep modulars.
Option B
Choosing to eliminate access for students from the MMES boundary into dual immersion, would be a significant policy change and have significant public opinion. Additionally, MMES would still open at 50% capacity and remain that way for a number of years as current dual immersion students and their future siblings were transported to CES or JES.
FAQs
Link to Board Workshop PPT
https://docs.google.com/a/tcsd.org/presentation/d/1SefmzM_4Y4qL_Tps7HR78pQ9tkkPsnSweNJOZ3id5w8/edit?usp=sharing
http://www.tcsd.org/education/components/scrapbook/default.php?sectiondetailid=23146&
Directions:
Click on items that are of interest to you.
Return to the main screen by clicking on the home button. You can also zoom in and out using the plus and minus buttons to the right of the screen.
Introduction to the issue:
After Munger Mountain Elementary School opens in the fall of 2018, there will be 3 K-5 schools in the current "in-town" area.
The board is currently reviewing the decision of having those schools be organized in whole school or strand models.
The decision is not specific to dual immersion students, as all students will attend school in whatever model is chosen--either with the whole school using the same instructional model or 1/2 the school using a traditional model and 1/2 the school using a dual immersion model.
This decision is about what's best for all students, not those in any one specific program.
In December, a district study group consisting of parents, teachers, and administrators met to review the options presented.
The advantages and disadvantages for each model were examined through the lens of each area of the district strategic plan. You'll see these marked by the TCSD logo.
Lastly, there is no academic student data comparing whole and strand models.
Staffing
.
Quick Summary:
The whole school model allows the system to "funnel" at 4th and 5th grade--saving 6 classroom teachers
The district is able to maintain the same level of Spanish programming for traditional students with one less teacher in the whole school model.
There would also be the need for at least .5 of an EL teacher in the whole school model.
Other specialists were left constant (ie music, special education, PEAK, etc.)
Any reductions in staff would happen over time as the models are fully articulated and be achieved through staff attrition.
In total, this results in 7.5 fewer staff needed for the whole school model
Links for more information
Click on the icon for more detail
Click on the icon for more detail
Click on the icon for more detail
Click on the icon for more detail
Click on the icon for more detail
Click on the icon for more detail
Ethnicity numbers are written as percent Anglo-percent Hispanic
FRL - Free & Reduced Lunch - School's measure of the percentage of students living in poverty
Total numbers used are based on current school enrollment, not projected future
Population Variance
.
Quick Summary:
Currently, overall class size variance is almost non-existent, because all classes from the same grade are in the same school. (example: all 1st grade classes are ~16:1)
When the district reconfigures to three K-5 elementary schools, there will be much more variance in class sizes depending on student enrollment from each attendance area. (example: there are currently grades where more than 50% of a grade level is from one attendance area, that means that the other attendance areas would have much smaller classes or fewer classes.
Having strands of each program in each school, further weakens the ability to manage enrollment variations, because the "pool" of students for each program is smaller. (example: most grades are not evenly split between dual immersion and traditional classes across the school boundaries.)
Links for more information
Click on the icon for more detail
Click on the icon for more detail
Peer Group
Traditional
1:82
Currently all same-age peers attend school together and are mixed from year to year with all the other peers in their same program (traditional or dual immersion)
Kindergarten Example
Dual
1:98
When MMES opens, 1/3 of each grade will be at each school
MMES
CES
JES
Since students are only mixed from year to year with peers in their same program, students in a strand model would only be mixed with two groups of students from K-5th grade
1:60
1:60
MMES
CES
JES
1:60
1:30
1:30
1:30
1:30
1:30
1:30
K-5 Reconfiguration
The board voted to reconfigure JES and CES into K-5 schools for the 2017-2018 school year at their Jan. 11th, 2016 board meeting.
That is a separate decision from the use of a strand or whole school models for JES, CES, and MMES.
Most recent board update on the plan for reconfiguration:
http://www.boarddocs.com/wy/teton1/Board.nsf/files/AG9VXU82ED29/$file/Reconfiguration%20Timeline%20v6.pdf
http://www.boarddocs.com/wy/teton1/Board.nsf/files/AFDUTB7D92EA/$file/TCSD%20Enrollment%20Projections%20Updated.pdf
Click on the icon for more detail
With the current number of dual immersion strands (3), that means there are 6 total classes of dual immersion students at each grade. Student enrollment projections indicate approximately 11 total classes per grade. If the dual immersion program continued expansion, that would mean the dual immersion schools would have 6 classes per grade or 32 total classes in one building (funneling 4th and 5th). The other two schools would only have 2 classes in one and 3 in the other at each grade, meaning a total of 12 and 16 classes respectively.
This would require the use of modulars for the dual immersion school (if at JES or CES) and the traditional schools would each be at less than 1/2 capacity.
The district can still decide to expand the dual immersion program at a later time. (See "Access to Programs" for more information)
Option 1 - Continued Expansion of Dual
Dual Immersion School
Traditional School
Traditional School
Click on the icon for more detail
Click on the icon for more detail
Having 16:1 class sizes for 4 classes, means that each grade would be approximately 64 students. In a whole school model, where all students are in the same program, those classes can be combined into 3 classes of 21 students. This matches the current state funding model. However, for schools with two different strands, classes cannot be combined, because there are 32 students from each program at each grade. Those students could not be combined with each other for class and 32 is way too many to have in one classroom.
Funneling
16:1
16:1
16:1
16:1
21:1
21:1
21:1
= 64 = students
&
4 teachers
These charts show the current enrollment by boundary for the three schools. Highlighted boxes indicate classes that the district would have to combine to stay within the funding model. Unfortunately, in a strand model, you could not combine dual immersion and traditional students. In a whole school model, you could combine 4 classes into 3, even though it would still make classes across the district vary different sizes.
These charts show the current enrollment by boundary and by program (Traditional or Dual Immersion). You can see that as the group size gets smaller, the variance in class size becomes extreme. This would cause some years to have two teachers at a grade level, some years three, and some years four. Teachers would have to move grades and probably across schools depending on the student populations
This chart shows the current enrollment for MMES by Hispanic and all others. You would need to have as close to half of the strand of dual immersion by native Spanish-speakers (16 students). You can see that almost all the grades are not close to that. Additionally, those students may or may not opt into the dual immersion program.
.
Jan 11th, 2017 Workshop
http://www.boarddocs.com/wy/teton1/Board.nsf/files/AHHN3T5E021B/$file/Final%20Final%20Board%20Workshop-%20Dual%20Immersion.pdf
http://www.boarddocs.com/wy/teton1/Board.nsf/files/A64QVX6506C6/$file/Jan%2011%202016%20workshop.pdf
Jan 11th, 2016 Workshop
Winter 2016-2017
Winter 2015-2016
Study Group
Won't having the dual immersion program in one school split families?
.
Quick Summary:
There are currently 16 families who have siblings in both dual immersion and traditional programs at the elementary levels. This is a very small percentage of families.
Families would continue to have the option of requesting the dual immersion program, so it would be at their discretion if they wanted to have children in two different schools.
Click on the icon for more detail
Links for more information
1:30
Having 16:1 class sizes for 4 classes, means that each grade would be approximately 64 students. In a whole school model, where all students are in the same program, those classes can be combined into 3 classes of 21 students. This matches the current state funding model. However, for schools with two different strands, classes cannot be combined, because there are 32 students from each program at each grade. Those students could not be combined with each other for class and 32 is way too many to have in one classroom.
Funneling
16:1
16:1
16:1
16:1
21:1
21:1
21:1
= 64 = students
&
4 teachers
https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B0kav8kHTuqwM1ktd0w0Nlc2Z3c/view?usp=sharing
The dual immersion selection process was developed through a year-long process involving community members, parents, TCSD staff, and board members.
See the link to the right for the full procedures
http://www.boarddocs.com/wy/teton1/Board.nsf/files/AEMPYE66DBDF/$file/DI%20Program%20Update%20to%20Board%2010-12-16.pptx.pdf
Click on the link to the right for the last board update on the dual immersion program from Oct. 2016
Dual immersion programs are by far the most successful at closing the achievement gap for Latino students and at helping Anglo students become bilingual.
Overall, almost Anglo students in dual immersion score almost the same as those in traditional programming. Almost all Latino cohorts in TCSD who are in the dual immersion program score better than their peers in traditional programs. However, not all groups are scoring at the national average.
This is due to a few factors:
The TCSD program is very new and because of frequent expansion, that "newness" is extended as we continue to add new teachers, new grades, etc.
In most cases, the national data is based on whole school model or very distinct "schools within schools" rather than the connected strands we have attempted.
Historically, the dual immersion classes have been significantly larger than the traditional classes, often 20-22 per class, whereas the traditional classrooms over the l5-6 years have been 16-18.
Dual immersion students do not currently have access to bilingual interventions. This is one of the many program components still being developed
Quick Summary:
Considerations for Transportation Options
Each option is a significant net savings as compared to what we do now.
In 18-19 and 19-20, the strand model would require one additional bus to transport 4th and 5th grade dual immersion students from the MMES, because there would not yet be dual immersion classes for those grades at that school.
From 20-21 on, the number of buses and cost savings would stay constant.
See slide with differences between the options for non-cost differences. Longer ride times for the "Whole school w/ hubs" model will increase costs.
Current Cost Estimates
Strand Model
Shortest ride times
Least amount of buses (same as hubs)
Smallest bus traffic impact to community
School start and end times the same
Smallest overall budget
No transfer/hubs
Probably least discipline issues
Some students who transfer from hub will have longer ride time
Least amount of buses (same as strands)
Increase to impact of community traffic
Magnet school would need to have different start/stop times
Although same routes, larger budget for some transfer routes
Similar to current system--some routes covered twice
More buses as compared with strands or hubs, but less than current
No transfer times and no monitors needed (like with hubs)
Schools can have same start and end times
Whole School - Hubs
Whole School -
no Hubs
Full transcript