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A Midsummer Night's Dream: Act II

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Abigail Whitaker

on 7 March 2013

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Transcript of A Midsummer Night's Dream: Act II

Demetrius & Helena Puck Oberon & Titania Lysander & Hermia Act II
Oberon:
Give me that boy and I will go with thee. Titania (arguing with Oberon):

And never, since the middle summer’s spring,
Met we on hill, in dale, forest, or mead,
By pavèd fountain, or by rushy brook,
Or in the beachèd margent of the sea,
To dance our ringlets to the whistling wind,
But with thy brawls thou hast disturbed our sport.
Therefore the winds, piping to us in vain,
As in revenge, have sucked up from the sea
Contagious fogs, which falling in the land
Have every pelting river made so proud
That they have overborne their continents. Titania:

Set your heart at rest.
The Fairyland buys not the child of me.

Oberon:

Well, go thy way. Thou shalt not from this grove
Till I torment thee for this injury Puck:

Thou speak’st aright.
I am that merry wanderer of the night.
I jest to Oberon and make him smile Oberon (talking to Puck, planning to
prank on Titania):
Yet marked I where the bolt of Cupid fell.
It fell upon a little western flower,
Before milk-white, now purple with love’s wound.
And maidens call it “love-in-idleness.”
Fetch me that flower. The herb I showed thee once.
The juice of it on sleeping eyelids laid
Will make or man or woman madly dote
Upon the next live creature that it sees. Hermia:
Be it so, Lysander. Find you out a bed,
For I upon this bank will rest my head.
(Her and Lysander go to sleep) Lysander (lost in the woods, talking to Hermia):
Fair love, you faint with wandering in the wood.
And to speak troth, I have forgot our way.
We’ll rest us, Hermia, if you think it good.
And tarry for the comfort of the day. Demetrius:

Do I entice you? Do I speak you fair?
Or rather, do I not in plainest truth
Tell you I do not, nor I cannot, love you? Helena:

And even for that do I love you the more.
I am your spaniel. And, Demetrius,
The more you beat me, I will fawn on you.
Use me but as your spaniel—spurn me, strike me,
Neglect me, lose me. Only give me leave,
Unworthy as I am, to follow you.
What worser place can I beg in your love—
And yet a place of high respect with me—
Than to be usèd as you use your dog? Helena:

And even for that do I love you the more.
I am your spaniel. And, Demetrius,
The more you beat me, I will fawn on you.
Use me but as your spaniel—spurn me, strike me,
Neglect me, lose me. Only give me leave,
Unworthy as I am, to follow you.
What worser place can I beg in your love—
And yet a place of high respect with me—
Than to be usèd as you use your dog? Demetrius (leaving):
I will not stay thy questions. Let me go.
Or if thou follow me, do not believe
But I shall do thee mischief in the wood.

Helena (chasing Demetrius through the woods):
I’ll follow thee and make a heaven of hell,
To die upon the hand I love so well. Oberon (invisible, listening to Demetrius and Helena's conversation):
Fare thee well, nymph. Ere he do leave this grove,
Thou shalt fly him and he shall seek thy love. (Puck enters) Oberon:
Hast thou the flower there? Welcome, wanderer.

Oberon:I pray thee, give it me.
(takes flower from Puck) Oberon:
I know a bank where the wild thyme blows,
Where oxlips and the nodding violet grows,
Quite overcanopied with luscious woodbine,
With sweet musk roses and with eglantine.
There sleeps Titania sometime of the night,
Lulled in these flowers with dances and delight.
And there the snake throws her enameled skin,
Weed wide enough to wrap a fairy in.
And with the juice of this I’ll streak her eyes
And make her full of hateful fantasies. Demetrius & Helena ( Oberon gives Puck some of the flower and is talking to him about Demetrius and Helena):

Take thou some of it and seek through this grove:
A sweet Athenian lady is in love
With a disdainful youth. Anoint his eyes.
But do it when the next thing he espies
May be the lady. Thou shalt know the man
By the Athenian garments he hath on.
Effect it with some care, that he may prove
More fond on her than she upon her love.
And look thou meet me ere the first cock crow. Lysander and Hermia have run away to
the woods, after Egeus (Hermia's father) has
forbidden the two of them to get married. Oberon: (squeezing flower juice on TITANIA ’s eyelids):
What thou seest when thou dost wake,
Do it for thy true love take.
Love and languish for his sake.
Be it ounce or cat or bear,
Pard or boar with bristled hair,
In thy eye that shall appear,
When thou wakest, it is thy dear.
Wake when some vile thing is near.
Puck:
Through the forest have I gone.
But Athenian found I none,
On whose eyes I might approve
This flower’s force in stirring love.
(sees LYSANDER and HERMIA)
Night and silence! Who is here?
Weeds of Athens he doth wear.
This is he, my master said,
Despisèd the Athenian maid.
And here the maiden, sleeping sound
On the dank and dirty ground.
Pretty soul! She durst not lie
Near this lack-love, this kill-courtesy.
(squeezes flower juice on LYSANDER’s eyelids)
Churl, upon thy eyes I throw
All the power this charm doth owe.
When thou wakest, let love forbid
Sleep his seat on thy eyelid.
So awake when I am gone,
For I must now to Oberon. (Enter DEMETRIUS and HELENA, running)
Helena:
Stay, though thou kill me, sweet Demetrius.

Demetrius:
I charge thee, hence, and do not haunt me thus.

Helena:
O, wilt thou darkling leave me? Do not so.

Demetrius:
Stay, on thy peril. I alone will go Helena (stopping for a moment):
Oh, I am out of breath in this fond chase.
The more my prayer, the lesser is my grace.
Happy is Hermia, wheresoe'er she lies,
For she hath blessèd and attractive eyes.
How came her eyes so bright? Not with salt
tears.
If so, my eyes are oftener washed than hers.
No, no, I am as ugly as a bear,
For beasts that meet me run away for fear.
Therefore no marvel though Demetrius
Do, as a monster, fly my presence thus.
What wicked and dissembling glass of mine
Made me compare with Hermia’s sphery eyne?
(sees LYSANDER)
But who is here? Lysander, on the ground?
Dead or asleep? I see no blood, no wound.—
Lysander, if you live, good sir, awake. LYSANDER:
(waking and seeing Helena) And run through fire I will for thy sweet sake.
Transparent Helena! Nature shows art
That through thy bosom makes me see thy
heart.
Where is Demetrius? Oh, how fit a word
Is that vile name to perish on my sword! Helena:
Do not say so, Lysander. Say not so.
What though he love your Hermia? Lord, what though?
Yet Hermia still loves you. Then be content. Lysander:
Content with Hermia? No. I do repent
The tedious minutes I with her have spent.
Not Hermia but Helena I love.
Who will not change a raven for a dove?
The will of man is by his reason swayed,
And reason says you are the worthier maid.

Enter DEMETRIUS, HELENA following him
Demtrius:
I love thee not, therefore pursue me not.
Where is Lysander and fair Hermia?
The one I’ll stay, the other stayeth me
Thou told’st me they were stol'n unto this wood.
And here am I, and wood within this wood,
Because I cannot meet my Hermia.
Hence, get thee gone, and follow me no more.

Helena:
You draw me, you hard-hearted adamant.
But yet you draw not iron, for my heart
Is true as steel. Leave you your power to draw,
And I shall have no power to follow you

Demetrius:
Do I entice you? Do I speak you fair?
Or rather, do I not in plainest truth
Tell you I do not, nor I cannot, love you? Helena:
Wherefore was I to this keen mockery born?
When at your hands did I deserve this scorn?
Is ’t not enough, is ’t not enough, young man,
That I did never, no, nor never can,
Deserve a sweet look from Demetrius' eye,
But you must flout my insufficiency?
Exit Helena Lysander (chases after Helena):
She sees not Hermia.—Hermia, sleep thou there.
And never mayst thou come Lysander near!
For as a surfeit of the sweetest things
The deepest loathing to the stomach brings,
Or as the heresies that men do leave
Are hated most of those they did deceive,
So thou, my surfeit and my heresy,
Of all be hated, but the most of me.—
And all my powers, address your love and might
To honor Helen and to be her knight.
Exits Lysander. Hermia
(waking, unaware of what has happened) Help me, Lysander, help me! Do thy best
To pluck this crawling serpent from my breast.
Ay me, for pity! What a dream was here.
Lysander, look how I do quake with fear.
Methought a serpent eat my heart away,
And you sat smiling at his cruel pray.
Lysander!—What, removed?—Lysander, lord!—
What, out of hearing, gone? No sound, no word?—
Alack, where are you? Speak, an if you hear.
Speak, of all loves! I swoon almost with fear.
No? Then I well perceive you all not nigh.
Either death or you I’ll find immediately.
Exit Hermia. (End of Act) Love-in-Idleness- Pansy Flower Wood- mad, insane.
Adament- stone with magnetic properties Weed- garment, cloak Ounce- wildcat Darkling- in the dark Surfeit- overabundance
Full transcript