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Copy of Rhetorical Appeals

Defines and describes the three rhetorical appeals present in most modes of persuasion: Logos, Pathos, and Ethos.
by

Kate Borsuk

on 11 May 2015

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Transcript of Copy of Rhetorical Appeals

How authors and speakers persuade their audience.
Rhetorical Appeals
Audience
Purpose
First you must know two things:
The audience and the purpose.
Consider all forms
of identity.
Gender
Age
Class
Hobbies
Political Affiliation
Interests
Watch the following commercial for the Ford Flex (car): Who do you think is the intended audience?
If you only think the audience is moms, think harder....
Middle-Age?
Upper class?
Soccer Mom?
Three common kinds
of purpose:
Entertain
Inform
Persuade
Who do you think the intended audience is?
Watch the following commercial for the Ford Flex (car):
Sexuality
Etc....
Occupation
Logos
Pathos
Ethos
Logos:
The appeal to logic and reason.
Logos commonly takes the form of:
Statistics
Facts
Assertions
Explicit Claims
Logical Explanations
Simply put, logos is the attempt to make something seem logical, rational, or just plain common sense.
Expert Testimony
Pathos:
The author/speaker could be attempting to make the audience feel:
Happiness
Sadness
Nostalgic
Fearful
Guilty
Sympathetic
Accepted
Free
Worrisome
Excited
But.....
This may or may not match the emotion of the author/speaker.
Example: A speaker could be sarcastic in order to make the audience angry.
The focus for pathos is on the
audience
.
Ethos:
The writer's appeal.
Likeability
Physical Attractivness
Personable
Expertise
Occupation
Education
Celebrity Status
Hierarchy of Ethos:
Top Level: Crediblity and Likeability
Middle Level: Credibility
Bottom Level: Likeability
A critical audience should value the expertise of the author/speaker the most.
Being likeable is helpful, but not most important when trying to persuade an intended audience.
Watch the following commercial for Gillette. How do the men in the commercial have ethos?
Now that you have a sense of how the appeals work...
Do the following activity to bring it all together.
Watch the following commericial for Weight Watchers.
This first time watching, think about who the audience is.
Remember to consider ALL aspects of identiy.
Now, watch it a second time with the three appeals in mind.
This commercial uses all three appeals (logos, pathos, and ethos). Try to find an example of all of them
Often, authors have more than one purpose.
There are three major elements of persuasion.
This is the appeal to common sense.
The appeal to a specific emotion/s of the reader.
Full transcript