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Perpetrator Pattern Mapping for Child Welfare Systems

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by

David Mandel

on 4 October 2016

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Transcript of Perpetrator Pattern Mapping for Child Welfare Systems

Perpetrator Pattern Mapping for Child Welfare Cases
Scope of Pattern
Full range of behaviors during presenting incident
Before, during and after
Pattern in current relationship
Behaviors in prior relationships
Other relevant behavior, e.g. violence in other settings
Indirect and direct actions towards children
Includes both abuse and neglect
Sources of Information
Child welfare records
Criminal background check
Interviews
Adult Survivor
Child Survivor
Perpetrator
Collateral contacts
Family
Friends
Providers
Adult Probation/Court
Implications
Worker safety
Children
Child safety and risk assessment
Connecting children's emotional, behavioral and other issues to perpetrator's behavior
Adult Survivor
Contextualizing adult survivor decision-making
Critical to building a meaning and effective partnership with adult domestic violence survivor
Perpetrator
One of the main areas of focus in interviewing and critical for any family centered practice approach
Setting behavioral case planning goals for the perpetrator
Information sharing with providers to enhance effectiveness of treatment
Measuring change
Practice
Increases ability to make meaningful connections between the domestic violence to substance abuse, mental health, culture and other issues
Keeping focus on the perpetrator in supervision and meetings
Ensuring neglect petitions focus on the source of the source of the risk and safety concerns related to domestic violence
Tips
List the perpetrator's pattern of behavior on sheet of paper
Focus on actions and statements
When confronted with a result of his behavior or circumstance, e.g. "mother is estranged from her family as a result of the abuse" ask "how?" What did the perpetrator do or say to create the estrangement?
Seek to understand the behaviors associated with terms like "temper issue" and "jealous" or statements like "He doesn't like me going out with friends."
"How does he let you know that he doesn't like you going out? What does he do and say?"
Make sure to look beyond physical violence to controlling behaviors
Include not taking responsibility for prior violence as part of pattern
Beware of gender double standards
Make best use of the information gathered
Document
Share with supervisor/legal
Step 1: Identify the Perpetrator’s Pattern of Coercive Control And Actions taken to Harm the children
(1st & 2nd Critical Components)
List the behaviors the perpetrator has engaged in to degrade child and family functioning. In this step you are outlining the perpetrator’s behavior and statements (actions), not its impact on child and family functioning.

Worker Safety
Does the perpetrator have any known history of threatening or harming others outside the family?
Response to law enforcement & CPS
What does the adult survivor say about his likely reaction to CPS involvement?
Is the situation escalating?
Does the perpetrator own or have access to weapons?
Children
Child safety and risk assessment
Physical safety
Physical abuse of children
Violence or threats of violence towards partner that create child safety concerns, e.g. driving dangerously
Neglect that creates safety issues
Interference with basic needs being met
Interference with partner's parenting
Impact on immediate and overall functioning and stability of household, e.g. safe, stable housing or educational disruptions
Interference with food, medical care
Connecting children's emotional, behavioral and other issues to perpetrator's behavior
Trauma related symptoms and issues
Aggression
Depression
Developmental delays
Educational and social problems related to violence leading to relocation
Disruption in relationship with extended family

Contextualizing adult survivor decision-making
We cannot understand the adult survivor's decision making, particularly her protective efforts and safety planning without understanding the perpetrator's behavior
"I'm assuming you've been taking steps to make things better/keep yourself and your children safe in the face of your partner's behavior. I want to learn more about these efforts."
Critical to building a meaningful and effective partnership with adult domestic violence survivor
Building a partnership with the adult survivor requires the ability to identify the perpetrator's behavior, not her behavior and choices nor the relationship as the source of the child welfare concern
"Given that we've seen no change in his pattern, we remain concerned for you and your children."
"It's not fair but given that he remains dangerous and we've tried everything in our power to address his behavior with him, we want to work with you to develop a plan that keeps you and your children safe."
Adult Survivor
One of the main areas of focus in interviewing and critical for any family centered practice approach
Can he talk about what he did?
What is his understanding of the impact on his children, partners, himself, family functioning?
What is he willing to do to change this behavior and address its impact on the family?
Setting behavioral case planning goals for the perpetrator
Case plans should describe what expected to be different in perpetrator behavior
Pattern of behavior forms the baseline for change
Services help support behavior change
Some changes do not require a service, e.g. maintain utilities for children's home
Information sharing with providers to enhance effectiveness of treatment
Providers need information about perpetrator's pattern from child welfare for accurate assessment, treatment and progress reporting
Measuring change
Child welfare uses information from provider, family members to assess behavior change
This cannot be left up to just the provider
Perpetrator

Increases ability to make meaningful connections between the domestic violence to substance abuse, mental health, culture and other issues
How is the perpetrator pattern connected to their own mental heath and substance abuse issues?
Is the mental health diagnosis accurate?
How did any mental health assessment address the abuse/safety issues?
Based on the pattern, what has the perpetrator done/might do to sabotage or undermine treatment of other family members?
Are the other family members treatment providers informed about relevant information about perpetrator's pattern?
Keeping focus on the perpetrator in supervision and meetings
Effective supervision and meetings related to domestic violence needs to include a shared understanding of perpetrator's behavior pattern
Ensuring neglect petitions focus on the true source of the risk and safety concerns related to domestic violence
Court petitions and other documentation need to paint a picture of how the perpetrator's behavior are creating the reason for filing.
Practice
Be transparent with adult survivor and children about limits of confidentiality/plans to protect information
Ask adult survivors to help you assess the impact child welfare involvement will have on her and the children's safety
Make sure information from adult survivor and children is handled to ensure safety
Clearly mark information that might increase danger if disclosed to perpetrator
Safety plan with adult survivor if prior to any disclosure of information to perpetrator

Safety Issues
Unknowns & Questions
What is not known about the perpetrator's pattern?
What's most important to learn?
What is the plan to gather this information?

Step 2: Map the perpetrator’s pattern onto the child And family functioning (4th Critical Component)

Complete the following sentences:

The perpetrator’s behavior pattern caused the following trauma related effects on the children:


The perpetrator’s behavior pattern disrupted the family’s ecology in the following ways:

The perpetrator’s behavior pattern affected the other parent’s parenting in the following ways:

How else did the perpetrator’s behavior pattern impact child and family functioning?
Step 3: Mapping the perpetrator pattern onto adult survivors Strengths (3rd Critical Component)

List as many behaviors as is known in this case in response to each sentence.


The adult survivor did ________ to promote safety of the children in response to the perpetrator’s coercive control and actions to harm the children.



The adult survivor did ________ to promote healing from trauma of the children in response to the perpetrator’s coercive control and actions to harm the children.



The adult survivor did ________ to promote stability and nurturance of the children in the face of perpetrator’s coercive control and actions to harm the children.



What else did the adult survivor do to promote child and family functioning in the context of the perpetrator’s behavior pattern?
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