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The Odyssey: Scylla and Charybdis

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Monica Do

on 10 January 2016

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Transcript of The Odyssey: Scylla and Charybdis

Major Events to Remember
Characters
Odysseus - the main protagonist of The Odyssey, who is trying to get home to Ithaca.
Sirens - dangerous ladies who lure men to their deaths with their voices
Circe - The beautiful witch-goddess who warns Odysseus about the Sirens, Scylla, and Charybdis
Scylla - a sea monster with six heads that takes one sailor for each head
Charybdis - an enormous whirlpool that threatens to swallow the entire ship
Synopsis
Odysseus and his men return to Circe's Island, where Circe notifies Odysseus of the issues that await him. They approach the island of the lovely Sirens, and Odysseus plugs his men’s ears with beeswax and has them bind him to the mast of the ship, as Circe instructed. He alone hears their song, and the Sirens’ song is so seductive that Odysseus begs to be released from the rope that is binding him. However, his faithful men only bind him tighter. Once they have passed the Sirens’ island, Odysseus and his men must navigate the straits between Scylla and Charybdis. Scylla is a six-headed monster who swallows one sailor for each head as the ship passes by. Charybdis is an enormous whirlpool that threatens to swallow the entire ship. Odysseus keept the ship on tight course against the cliffs of Scylla’s lair. While the ship is getting closer to Charybdis, Scylla swoops downs and swallows six of Odysseus's best men. Odysseus and the rest of the men arrive near the Island of the Sun God, Helios.
Ancient Greek Values
Odysseus portrayed many Greek Values during this epic. The Greek Values he portrayed were:
Bravery
Strength
Faithfulness
Loyalty

Epic Hero Traits
Odysseus portrayed many hero traits during this epic. The Epic Hero Traits he portrayed were:
excels in skill, strength, and courage
man of action
meets monsters
encounter women who tempt him
The Odyssey: Scylla & Charybdis
Physical Characteristic of the Individual:
Bravery
"But if you wish to listen,/ let the men tie you in the lugger.../ you may hear thouse Harpies' thrilling voices;/ shout as you will, begging to be untied,/ your crew must only twist more line around you/... till the singers fade..."(778)
These quote portrays Odysseus as a man with bravery because he willingly wanted to listen to the Siren's song to understand how it sounds like and what it will do to one. He also showed bravery when he wanted to suit up with armor and weapons, so he can kill Scylla.
"I tied on my cuirass and took up/ two heavy spears, then made my way along/ to the foredeck -- thinking to see her first from there." (782)
Physical Characteristic of the Individual:
Strength
Mental Characteristic of the Individual:
Faithfulness
Mental Characteristic of the Individual:
Loyalty
"She ate them as they shrieked there, in her den,/... deathly pity ran me through/ at that sight - far the worst I ever suffered/ questing the passes of the strange sea./ We rowed on." (783)
This quote shows that Odysseus has strength to carry on his mission because he was able to bring the rest of his shipmates to safety even at the loss of his six men to a safer place closer to their home, Itaca.
"Heads up, lads!/We must obey the orders as I give them./Get the oar shafts in your hands, and lie back hard on your benchs; hit these breaking seas./Zeus help us pull away before we founder." (782)
This quote shows that Odysseus is faithful towards his men and Zeus. Odysseus was faithful towards his men by trying to keep them from harm and alive. He also asked for Zeus assistance to keep them from sinking, so he believed that Zeus would keep his men and him alive.
"We rowed on./ The Rocks were now behind; Charybdis, too, and Scylla dropped astern./ Then we were coasting the noble island of the god," (783)
This quote shows that Odysseus is loyal to his mission and to the Gods. In the first quote, Odysseus continued on with his mission to get back home with his men, so he was loyal to his mission. In the second quote, Odysseus was loyal to Zeus by asking for his help and knowing that his faith was in Zeus's hands.
"Zeus help us pull away before we founder." (782)
Epic Hero Trait:
1. Excels in skill, strength, and courage
Epic Hero Trait:
7. A man of action
Epic Hero Trait:
10. Meets monsters
Epic Hero Trait:
11. Encounter women who tempt him
"But if you wish to listen,/ let the men tie you in the lugger/... you may hear thouse Harpies' thrilling voices;/ shout as you will, begging to be untied,/ your crew must only twist more line around you/... till the singers fade..."(778)
"Friends,/have we never been in danger before this?/ More fearsome, is it now, than when the Cyclops/peed us in his cave? What power he had!/Did I not keep my nerve, and use my wits/ to fing a way out for us?" (782)
These quotes show that Odysseus has Epic Hero trait of being skillful, strong, and being courageous. In the first quote, Odysseus had the strength and courage to listen to the Siren's song, even after hearing about the consequences it may lead to. In the second quote, Odysseus expressed how the Cyclops was an issue, but he and his men were able to beat the Cyclops because of his wits. By reminding his men about a glorious victory, it may encourage them to do better against Scylla and Charybdis, showing that Odysseus has the skills to lead people.
"Heads up, lads!/We must obey the orders as I give them./Get the oar shafts in your hands, and lie back hard on your benchs; hit these breaking seas./Zeus help us pull away before we founder." (782)
"I tied on my cuirass and took up/ two heavy spears, then made my way along/ to the foredeck -- thinking to see her first from there." (782)
These quotes show that Odysseus is a man of action because he ordered his men to be prepare for battle against Scylla and Charybdis. He also prepared for battle by putting on armor and weapons to fight Scylla with. He lead his men out of Scylla's lair and near the Island of Helios.
"Her legs--/ and there are twelve-- are like great tentacles,/ unjointed, and upon her serpent necks/ are bortne six heads like nightmares of ferocity... Half her length, she sways/ her head in air, outside her horrid cleft,"(778)
"A great wild fig, a shaggy mass of leaves,/grows on it, and Charybdis lurks below/ to swallow down the dark sea tide.Three tomes/ from dawn to dusk she spews it up/ and sucks it down again three times, a whirling maelstrom;" (779)
These quotes prove that Odysseus met monsters, such as Scylla and Charybdis, on this adventure. He survived meeting both monsters, but at the loss of six of his best men.
"The rocks were now behind; Charybdis, too,/ and Scylla dropped astern." (783)
"Square in your ship's path are Sirens, crying/ beauty to bewitch men coasting by;/ woe to the innocent who hear that sound!/ He will not see his lady nor his children." (778)
" You may hear those Harpies' thrilling voices;/ shout as you will, begging to be untied,/ your crew must only twist more line around you/ and keep their stroke up, till the singers fade..." (778)
These quotes show that Odysseus had encountered women who tempt him. Circe warns Odysseus that the Siren's songs will lead him farther away from home and his wife. Also, his men tied him up to keep him from falling into the Siren's trap.
1. Odysseus was informed about the danger that lies ahead from Circe.
2. Odysseus encounters the Sirens and survives their deadly song.
3. Odysseus learns that Scylla is a six-headed sea monster that feeds on men.
4. Odysseus learns that Charybdis is an enourmous whirlpool that can swallow his ship.
5. Odysseus leads his men into battle against Scylla and Charybdis.
6. Odysseus loses six of his best men to Scylla.
7. Odysseus and the remaining men arrive near the Island of the Sun God, Helios.
Work Cited
"The Odyssey." SparkNotes. SparkNotes, n.d. Web. 17 Dec. 2015.
The Odyssey: Scylla and Charybdis
The Odyssey: The Cyclops
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