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The Fault in Our Stars

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by

Bridget Pelfrey

on 29 October 2012

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Transcript of The Fault in Our Stars

By: John Green Genre Realistic Fiction Pages: 313 About John Green Setting - Indiana,
United States - modern day -New York Times bestseller
-Indianapolis, Indiana
-wife and son (Green). -received the Michael L. Printz
award in 2006 (Green). -Bestseller for: An Abundance of Katherines, Looking for Alaska, The Fault in our Stars, and Will Grayson, Will Grayson. (Green). Characters Primary Character: Hazel Grace Lancaster -16 years old
-had Stage IV thyroid cancer
-decreased tumors with Phalanxifor.
-has a cannula and oxygen cart that goes with her everywhere
-smart, takes college classes
-sarcastic and funny, likable Secondary Character: Augustus Waters -17 years old, nicknamed Gus
-Also a cancer patient, has a prosthetic leg
-was cancer free (cf) for over 9 months
-falls in love with Hazel
-his cancer comes back
-very charismatic and likable character Secondary Character: Peter Van Houten
-author of Gus and Hazel's favorite book An Imperial Affliction
-invites Hazel and Augustus to Amsterdam
-personality surprises Hazel and Gus when they meet him Conflict Man vs. Nature: Hazel and Gus are battling cancer. PLOT Point 1st Person: Hazel tells the story of View Mood T H E M E Complex: sense of love and
happiness also sadness because of
their physical states 1. Hazel meets Augustus at a cancer support group. 2. Hazel and Gus' friend Isaac, who also has cancer,
has his eyes removed. The Fault in our Stars 3. Gus asks Hazel to go to Amsterdam with him as part of his cancer "Wish," to meet their favorite author. It is postponed because Hazel goes to the emergency room for poor oxygenation. 4. They end up going to Amsterdam and meeting Peter Van Houten and on the way home, Gus tells Hazel he has cancer again. 5. Peter Van Houten comes back to America to talk
to Hazel and has a long discussion with her. modern dilemmas and problems occur "It was a cloudy day, typical Indiana: the
kind of weather that boxes you in. Our
little backyard was dominated by my
childhood swing set, which was looking
pretty waterlogged and pathetic."
(Green 53-54). "It felt like everything was rising up in me, like I
was drowning in this weirdly painful joy, but I
couldn't say anything back. I just looked at him
and let him look at me until he nodded, lips
pursed, and turned away, placing the side of his
head against the window" (Green 154). "I'd never been anything
but terminal; all my
treatment had been in
pursuit of extending my
life, not curing my cancer.
Phalanxifor had introduced
a measure of ambiguity to
my cancer story, but I was
different from Augustus: My
final chapter was written
upon diagnosis. Gus, like
most cancer survivors, lived
with uncertainty" (Green 166). Life doesn't give you the choice of getting hurt or not, it just happens. Gus and Hazel did not choose to have cancer, and neither did their friends. It was stated in the last paragraph of the book. Did I like it? Loved it! Great plot and kept
you on your toes. 10 out of 10 stars The most memorable part of the book was near the end, and I can't give it away. It has to do with Augustus. "He laughed it off. 'The thing about dead people,' he said, and then stopped himself. 'The thing is you sound like a bastard if you don't romanticize them, but the truth is . . . complicated, I guess. Like, you are familiar with the trope of the stoic and determined cancer victim who heroically fights her cancer with inhuman strength and never complains or stops smiling even at the
very end, etcetera?'

"'Indeed,' I said. 'They are kindhearted and generous souls whose every breath is an Inspiration to Us All. They're so strong! We
admire them so!" (Green 173). I connected with this book because they also have regular teenage problems, along with their medical conditions. I could relate to some of their teenager issues.
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