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Unit 703 Health & Saftey in Catering & Hospitality

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Matthew Pickett

on 17 September 2015

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Transcript of Unit 703 Health & Saftey in Catering & Hospitality

Unit 703 Health & Safety in Catering & Hospitality
Today's A&O's
To Define the terms Hazzard & Risk
To Discuss the Assignment criteria
How we're going to tackle the Assignment
Health & Safety in Catering and Hospitality
Assignment 703
Assignment Task A:

Produce a health and safety report to include information and detail relating to the following headings:

Regulations and Responsibilities Include:
1. Safety regulations and who is responsible
2. The powers of enforcement officers
3. Consequences of health and safety practices not being followed
4. Sources of information on health and safety, (government agency, websites etc).

Benefits, including:
1. Benefits of health and safety
2. Benefits of workplace design
3. Benefits of risk assessment

Hazards and Risks:
1. Common causes of accident and ill health at work
2. What is a hazard and what is a risk

Procedures, List and describe the procedures for the following:
1. Accident and incident reporting procedures
2. Emergencies and emergency reporting procedures
3. Extinguishing fires and dealing with electrical accidents

Assignment Task B:
1. Produce a risk assessment chart to include all of the main steps required to complete the process correctly and use this to complete a kitchen risk assessment.

2. Identify hazards of a real environment record them on in table form and identify the hazard and actions and controls to be taken.

So What Is Health & Safety?
RECOURCES
http://www.hse.gov.uk/pubns/caterdex.htm
http://www.exeter.gov.uk/index.aspx?articleid=9046
http://www.food.gov.uk/business-industry/caterers/sfbb
RISK
HAZARD
&
GAME TIME
Match the Hazzrd with the Risk!
Just A little Bit of Homework to keep your minds active
Health and safety

Published by Hodder Education
© John Campbell, David Foskett and Victor Ceserani

Kitchens can be dangerous places.
Work in a safe and systematic manner to avoid accidents and injury to yourself or anyone else.
All employers and employees must take reasonable care of their own safety and the safety of others.

The importance of health
and safety

Published by Hodder Education
© John Campbell, David Foskett and Victor Ceserani

Slips, trips or falls.
Manual handling.
Hazardous substances, hot surfaces or steam.
Equipment, machinery or knives.
Walking into objects.
Fire or explosions.
Electric shock.
Transport trucks.

Causes of accidents in the catering industry

Published by Hodder Education
© John Campbell, David Foskett and Victor Ceserani

Wear protective clothing.
Do not work under the influence of drink or drugs.
Do not wear jewellery: it can be caught in machinery.
Walk, do not run.
Use gangways, do not take short cuts.
Look out for and obey warning signs.

Personal safety

Published by Hodder Education
© John Campbell, David Foskett and Victor Ceserani

The Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations 1999 require employers to carry out risk assessment and COSHH assessment.
Hazard: anything that can cause harm, from a chemical to a ladder.
Risk: the chance, high or low, that someone will be harmed by a hazard.
Risk assessment: carefully examining what, in your work, could cause harm to people.

Managing health and safety

Published by Hodder Education
© John Campbell, David Foskett and Victor Ceserani

Identify hazards.
Decide who might be harmed, and how.
Evaluate the risk and decide whether existing precautions are adequate.
Record your findings.
Review the assessment regularly.

Risk assessment

Published by Hodder Education
© John Campbell, David Foskett and Victor Ceserani

Minimal: safe conditions with safety precautions in place.
Some: acceptable, but ensure that safety measures operate.
Significant: safety measures are not fully in operation – immediate action required.
Dangerous: stop the operation immediately and completely check the system.

Levels of risk

Published by Hodder Education
© John Campbell, David Foskett and Victor Ceserani

Determine what preventative measures are necessary.
Decide who will carry out safety inspections, and how often.
Determine how results will be reported, and to whom.
Decide how to ensure that inspections are effective.
Make sure employees have relevant on-the-job training.

Risk management

Published by Hodder Education
© John Campbell, David Foskett and Victor Ceserani

Reporting Injuries, Diseases and Dangerous Occurrences.
Regulations requiring employers to report all work-related injuries, diseases and dangerous occurrences to the Incident Contact Centre.
Employers must also keep records of all these occurrences.

RIDDOR

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© John Campbell, David Foskett and Victor Ceserani

Fracture, except of finger, thumb or toe.
Amputation.
Dislocation of hip, knee or spine.
Loss of sight (temporary or permanent); burn or penetration to the eye.
Electric shock or burn leading to unconsciousness or requiring admittance to hospital for more than 24 hours.
Unconsciousness caused by asphyxia or exposure to a harmful substance (inhaled, ingested or absorbed).
Acute illness requiring treatment, where this is believed to be caused by exposure to a biological agent or infected material.



Reportable injuries under RIDDOR

Published by Hodder Education
© John Campbell, David Foskett and Victor Ceserani

The Control of Substances Hazardous to Health (COSHH) Regulations 1999 requires employers to assess the risks to health before carrying on work that may expose employees to hazardous substances.
Find out what substances are in use in all areas.
Keep a COSHH register of all substances, with technical data sheets for them.

COSHH

Published by Hodder Education
© John Campbell, David Foskett and Victor Ceserani

The Provision and Use of Work Equipment Regulations 1998 require employers to ensure that:
Equipment is suitable for its intended use
Equipment is maintained in good working order
Employees receive adequate information and training on the use of equipment and the associated hazards.
Covers food processors, ovens, knives, etc.

PUWER

Published by Hodder Education
© John Campbell, David Foskett and Victor Ceserani

Only operate machines when you have training and permission to do so. Know and understand all the controls, including how to stop the machine in an emergency.
Use machines for the intended purpose.
Follow the exact safe way of using a machine.
Use safety guards for your own safety.
If you think a moving part is dangerous, ask your supervisor whether there should be a guard.


Working with machinery

Published by Hodder Education
© John Campbell, David Foskett and Victor Ceserani

Don’t wear dangling chains or loose clothes, and keep hair tucked under a cap or tied back.
Do not distract people who are using machinery.
Follow instructions for adjusting and cleaning a machine. Make sure nobody can switch it on while you are working on it.
Never use compressed air to clean machinery.
Report any possible malfunction or danger immediately.

Published by Hodder Education
© John Campbell, David Foskett and Victor Ceserani

Incorrect handling of heavy or awkward loads causes accidents.
When lifting, bend the knees, not the back.
Use trolleys, etc., where available.
Where appropriate, two people should lift the load together.
Make sure you can see where you are going while carrying a load.
Manual Handling Operations Regulations 1992 apply.

Manual handling

Published by Hodder Education
© John Campbell, David Foskett and Victor Ceserani

The Regulatory Reform Fire Safety Order 2005:
Makes a defined person, usually the employer, responsible for the safety of everyone in the building in the event of fire
Requires them to have adequate fire precautions in place
Requires them to assess the risk of fire, including the risk from dangerous substances in the event of fire
Requires them to review their measures of prevention and protection.

Fire safety: legislation

Published by Hodder Education
© John Campbell, David Foskett and Victor Ceserani

Identify hazards and reduce or remove them.
Escape routes must be safe with no obstructions and doors unlocked.
Fire detection, warning and fighting equipment must be available on the premises.
Instruct employees on the actions to take in case of fire.
Keep away from flames or sparks when handling flammable substances.
Obey ‘no smoking’ rules. Do not throw cigarette ends in corners or under benches.

Fire safety: precautions

Published by Hodder Education
© John Campbell, David Foskett and Victor Ceserani

Know what to do in a fire.
Know how to raise the alarm.
Know what the alarm sounds like.
Know where the fire exits are.
Know where the assembly point is.
Understand the fire instructions.
If you don’t know, ask.

Fire safety: checklist

Published by Hodder Education
© John Campbell, David Foskett and Victor Ceserani

Fire detection and warning equipment: essential to warn people soon enough, so that they can escape before the fire makes the escape routes unusable.
Fire-fighting equipment: must be appropriate for the risks. Employees must be trained in its use. Should only be used in the early stages of a fire, without exposing the user to danger.

Fire safety: equipment

Published by Hodder Education
© John Campbell, David Foskett and Victor Ceserani

Risk of severe burns or death.
Understand the instructions before using electrical equipment.
Switch off at the mains before connecting or disconnecting an appliance.
Report any damaged equipment or cables.

Electricity

Published by Hodder Education
© John Campbell, David Foskett and Victor Ceserani

When someone suffers an injury, as well as calling an ambulance, give them immediate treatment on the spot: first aid.
The Health and Safety (First Aid) Regulations 1981 require that first aiders, equipment and facilities must be available.
Of course, if the injury is serious, a doctor or nurse should then provide treatment as soon as possible.
An identifiable first aid box should be accessible in the work area. A responsible person should check it regularly and refill it.

First aid

Published by Hodder Education
© John Campbell, David Foskett and Victor Ceserani

Minimum contents of a first aid box:
A card with first aid guidance
20 individually wrapped, sterile, adhesive, waterproof dressings of different sizes
43 x 25 g packs of cotton wool
12 safety pins
2 triangular bandages
2 sterile eye pads, with attachment
4 medium, 2 large sterile, unmedicated dressings
Tweezers and scissors
Injury report book.

First aid: equipment

Published by Hodder Education
© John Campbell, David Foskett and Victor Ceserani

The Food Safety Act 1990:
Specifies the powers of Environmental Health Officers (EHOs)
Requires food operatives to be trained in food hygiene
Requires food premises to be registered with the local authority
Creates the defence of due diligence: if the catering organisation took all reasonable precautions for food safety, this can be used as a defence.

Food safety: legislation

Published by Hodder Education
© John Campbell, David Foskett and Victor Ceserani

The Food Hygiene (England) Regulations 2005:
Requires food business operators to put in place and implement a permanent procedure based on hazard analysis critical control points (HACCP)
Requires those responsible to have the knowledge and understanding to ensure that HACCP is implemented correctly
Requires food operatives to be trained in food hygiene.

Published by Hodder Education
© John Campbell, David Foskett and Victor Ceserani

Hazard analysis: identify all the risks that could create food safety hazards, including ingredients, processing stages, environment and human factors.
Identify critical control points (CCPs) where control is needed to prevent, eliminate or reduce a hazard.
Decide what is acceptable (critical limit) and put controls in place to meet it.
Check that controls are carried out; know what to do if something goes wrong (corrective action).

Food safety: HACCP

Published by Hodder Education
© John Campbell, David Foskett and Victor Ceserani

Establish procedures to confirm that the HACCP system is working effectively:
Validation: evidence that CCPs and critical limits are effective
Verification: that hazard analysis is still valid, hazards controlled, and monitoring and corrective action taking place.
Keep records of all procedures: required for auditing, and evidence of due diligence if required.

Monitoring HACCP

Published by Hodder Education
© John Campbell, David Foskett and Victor Ceserani

Correct food temperature when delivered, stored and displayed.
Prevention of cross-contamination.
Cleaning schedules for equipment.
Staff correctly trained and applying hygienic procedures.

Examples of CCPs

Published by Hodder Education
© John Campbell, David Foskett and Victor Ceserani

Personal hygiene and clean habits in the kitchen are important to prevent germs contaminating food.
Wash hands thoroughly and regularly, especially after visiting the toilet.
Keep fingernails short and clean.
Wash hair regularly. Keep it covered (not a legislative requirement). Do not handle it near food.
Wear no watch or jewellery (except a wedding ring): it can harbour bits of food and bacteria.
Do not sit on tables.

Food safety:
personal hygiene

Published by Hodder Education
© John Campbell, David Foskett and Victor Ceserani

Do not touch the ears, nose or mouth during food preparation.
Cover all cuts or sores with blue waterproof dressings.
Cough or sneeze in a handkerchief, not over food. People with colds should not handle food.
Use clean cloths and taste food with a clean spoon.
Shower or bathe regularly.
Wear clean, protective clothing and suitable footwear.
Do not wear cosmetics.
Do not smoke in kitchens: it is illegal.
Do not spit anywhere where there is food.

Published by Hodder Education
© John Campbell, David Foskett and Victor Ceserani

In Groups of 4 I would like you to spend 10 minutes thinking of:
A definition of H&S... 1 or 2 sentences
Who it protects & how?
What are the alternatives to Health & Safety
Lets look at the handout.
Next Week:
We have a special Guest joining us for the next two theory lessons, his name is

Lee Staples
. He works for the council and delivers H&S and Food hygiene courses.
were having a power point presentation that is jam packed full on info that is highly relevant to your assignment.
Bring your assignment templates, and
use them as a place to take notes
.
I want you all to come prepared with
3 written questions
, that by the end of next weeks lesson you will have the answer for.
What is COSHH?

COSHH is the law that requires employers to control substances that are hazardous to health. You can prevent or reduce workers exposure to hazardous substances by:

finding out what the health hazards are;

deciding how to prevent harm to health (risk assessment);

providing control measures to reduce harm to health;

making sure they are used ;

keeping all control measures in good working order;

providing information, instruction and training for employees and others;

providing monitoring and health surveillance in appropriate cases;

planning for emergencies.

http://www.hse.gov.uk/slips/preventing.htm
http://www.hse.gov.uk/firstaid/legislation.htm
http://www.hse.gov.uk/shatteredlives/industry-catering.htm
Still in your groups lets now try & Come up with a definition for a hazard & a risk
Who Agrees with that sentiment? Who Disagrees?
Lets Look at an example of poor H&S
Lets see the stats! its shocking!
Draft hand in: 16th October
Final Submission: 2nd November
Full transcript