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Building Better Dashboards (Training)

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Ideas in Motion

on 19 February 2015

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Transcript of Building Better Dashboards (Training)

Functionality
Provides users with additional detail of a summarized metric.
Allows users to define the scope of the dashboard data to reflect their needs.
Ability to see two or more subsets of data in a side-by-side format.
Questions?
Thank You!
Matt Seager,
Business Analyst

Shannon Stotenbur-Wing,
Engagement and External Relations Manager

Working with You to Promote Health
Using Active Voice
Writing in the Affirmative
Composing Simple Sentences
Simplifying Technical Language
Form
Timeliness:
How frequently is the dashboard data updated?
Aesthetic Value:
How important is it that the dashboard look attractive?
Connectivity:
Does the dashboard need to connect to live data sources?
Mobility:
Does the audience need to access the information on-the-go?
Data Detail:
Will the dashboard offer a drill down to see more context?
Data Density:
How information-rich will the data views be?
Will the user benefit from interacting with the dashboard?
Collaboration:
Should your audience be able to easily share and collaborate?
Interactivity:
Structure
Flow:
A flow-based structure
emphasizes a sequence of
events or actions across time.
Relationships:
The structure of a dashboard can also emphasize the relationships between entities or measures.
Grouping:
The structure of last resort
is to group related information into categories or a hierarchy.
Design Principles
Compactness/Moduarity:
Gradual reveal:
Guide attention:
Explanation before information:
Customizable:
Lead to action:
Support casual cause:
Dashboards can be broken into bite-sized
pieces, each built around a key question.
Reveal information as users express interest.
Visual cues & functionality draw users to things that matter most.
Minimize the barriers to entry for new users
Empower users to finish tasks quickly and understand
actions that should be taken based on the results.
Build in flexibility to allow the dashboard to become relevant for different users.
We need context and explanation to understand new and unfamiliar events.
Functionality
Drill down:
Filters:
Comparison:
Export/print:
Alerts:
Provides users with additional detail of a summarized metric.
Allows users to define the scope of the dashboard data to reflect their needs.
Ability to see two or more subsets of data in a side-by-side format.
Highlight information based on pre-defined criteria.
Gives users the ability to pull information out of a dashboard.
Establishing Narrative Flow
“Two pages of passive voice--just about any business document ever written, in other words, not to mention reams of bad fiction--make me want to scream. It's weak, it's circuitous, and it's frequently tortuous, as well.”
~ Stephen King
Instead of saying "this report is free
of errors," say "this report is accurate."
"If I started to write elaborately, or like someone introducing or presenting something, I found that I could cut that scrollwork or ornament out and throw it away and start with the first true simple declarative sentence I had written."
~ Ernest Hemmingway
Never write a sentence that includes more than one independent clause.
Reduce the use of acronyms.
Simplify without sacrificing accuracy, while avoiding analogies and metaphors.
Give readers only what they need. You do not need to describe how a system works if readers only need to know how it is used.
Answer who, what, when, where, and why in the first paragraph. This should take no more than three sentences. Use the rest of the article to explain how.
Put the most important information first.
Have a thesis and make sure your conclusion reinforces your thesis.
When using quotes, alternate between quotes and exposition.
Interviewer:
How much rewriting do you do?

Hemingway:
It depends. I rewrote the ending of
Farewell to Arms, the last page of
it, 39 times before I was satisfied.

Interviewer:
Was there some technical problem
there? What was it that had stumped you?

Hemingway:
Getting the words right.
Ernest Hemingway,
The 1956 Paris Review Interview
"Current healthcare literature says that without robust analytics technology, healthcare organizations can't fully achieve the goal of affordable, high-quality care, good intentions notwithstanding. The data is there, but the healthcare industry does not have an evenly distributed knowledge of how to use it effectively."


~ Lynn McVey, Hospital Impact
Note: Parts 1-3 are composed of selections reprinted directly from “A Guide to Creating Dashboards People Love to
Use” by Juice Analytics, 2009. The full version of this free guide is available online at
http://static.squarespace.com/static/52f42657 e4b0b3416ff6b831/t/5310292ce4b08d35a87c9426/1393568044420/Guide_to_Dashboard_Design.pdf.

*
Part 2: Structure
Introductions
Part 1: Clear Messaging
Part 4: Strong Writing
Part 3: Information Design
Questions
Part 3: Information Design
Organizing the page
Color
Font choice
Information display
Studies show that people tend to scan a page in a similar manner.
Color can draw your eye to what is important and tie together similar things.
Unnatural colors jump out at your audience, making them ideal for showing an alert.
Body text is clean, readable content.
Headers separate and name major sections of your work.
Notes describe additional things the reader should be aware of.
Emphasis text is what we want our reader to pay particular attention to.
Reduce chart-junk and increase data-to-ink ratio
Maximize contrast
Use readable labels
Don't repeat yourself
Organizing the Page
It is also important to incorporate white space into your dashboard.
Color
Font Choice
Fundamentals of chart & table design
Simplified:
Highly Technical:
This use case will use the health information exchange to more efficiently deliver information to provider systems. MiHIN's health provider directory will populate the data.
This UC will use the HIE to more efficiently deliver results-based information to the appropriate provider EHR systems, and is envisioned to leverage MiHIN’s Health Provider Directory (HPD).

The subject is the doer of the verb.
CHAMPS is a state-of-the-art system. It can easily interact and share data with other systems along the HIE chain. Its user interface is highly intuitive for both providers and back-end users.
CHAMPS is a state-of-the-art system that can easily interact and share data with other systems along the HIE chain, and its user interface is highly intuitive for both providers and back-end users.
Data analytics crucial to improving healthcare
Describe what something
IS
rather than what it
IS NOT.
Part 4: Strong Writing
Using Active Voice
Simplifying Technical Language
Minimize the number of subordinate clauses.
Establishing Narrative Flow
Strong Narrative Flow
Edit, Edit, Edit
CHAMPS permits eligibility inquiries.
CHAMPS does not block eligibility inquiries.
CHAMPS does not disallow eligibility inquiries.
CHAMPS stores Medicaid beneficiary eligibility.
Medicaid beneficiary eligibility data is stored in CHAMPS.
The object is the receiver of the verb.
In the active voice, the subject precedes the object.
Writing in the Affirmative
Composing Simple Sentences
What is a dashboard?
What is a dashboard?
Some people argue that something only qualifies as a dashboard if it fits on one-page or shows real-time information or offers a comprehensive view of a business.
Dashboards can come in many flavors. What never changes is good dashboards focus on the most important information and communicate this information clearly and concisely.
Those requirements are too constraining.
Tina Scott:
Thank You!
Questions?
What are the dashboard expectations at MDCH?
Clear
What is the added value?
What type of dashboard is being created?
Scope:
Specific
Customization:
Business role:
Time horizon:
Level of detail:
Point of view:
Historical
One-size-fits-all
High
Exploratory
Operational
What type of dashboard is this?
What type of dashboard am I creating?
Who is my audience?
Who is my audience?
Help management define what is important
Educate people in the organization about the things that matter
Set goals and expectations for specific individuals or groups
Help executives sleep at night because they know what is going on
Encourage specific actions in a timely manner
Highlight exceptions and provide alerts when problems occur
Communicate progress and success
Provide a common interface for interacting with and analyzing data
What value will the dashboard add?
Part 1
Messaging
Part 2
Structure
What additional design principles could be applied to this dashboard?
Which design principles are in effect here?
Compactness/Modularity:
Gradual reveal:
Guide attention:
Explanation before information:
Customizable:
Lead to action:
Support casual cause:
Dashboards can be broken into bite-sized
pieces, each built around a key question.
Reveal information as users express interest.
Visual cues & functionality draw users to things that matter most.
Minimize the barriers to entry for new users
Empower users to finish tasks quickly and understand
actions that should be taken based on the results.
Build in flexibility to allow the dashboard to become relevant for different users.
We need context and explanation to understand new and unfamiliar events.
Drill down:
Filters:
Comparison:
Export/print:
Alerts:
Provides users with additional detail of a summarized metric.
Allows users to define the scope of the
dashboard data to reflect their needs.
Ability to see two or more subsets of data in a side-by-side format.
Highlight information based on pre-defined criteria.
Gives users the ability to pull information out of a dashboard.
Functionality:
What are the fundamental objectiives that will guide your design principles?
What capabilities will the dashboard include to help users understand and interact with the information?
Design Principles:
Design Principles
Functionality
Timeliness
How frequently is the dashboard data updated?
Aesthetic Value
How important is it that the dashboard look attractive?
Connectivity
Does the dashboard need to connect to live data sources?
Mobility
Does the audience need to access the information on-the-go?
Data Detail
Will the dashboard offer a drill down to see more context?
Data Density
How information-rich will the data views be?
Will the user benefit from interacting with the dashboard?
Collaboration
Should your audience be able to easily share and collaborate?
Interactivity
Form
In what format is the dashboard delivered?
Flow:
Relationships:
Grouping:
How is the dashboard laid out to
help users understand the big picture?
Structure
Structure
What structures are used in the following dashboards?
The structure of a dashboard can also emphasize the relationships between entities or measures.
The structure of last resort is to group related information into categories or a hierarchy.
A flow-based structure emphasizes a
sequence of events or actions across time.
Full transcript