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Street Dance

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on 22 October 2014

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Transcript of Street Dance

Dance and Youth Subculture
Modern dance and street dance are one of the most contemporary forms of dance today . Goodman (Cohen, 1993) notes they are not just styles of dance but genres, which incorporate several many different styles or forms of dancing (Web Ref 1).


Most dance is classified n the function and historical development which created two main categories of dance.

1- performed by individuals or groups for an audience and the

2-category which is not performed by an audience by either individuals or groups (Kraus Hilsendager , & Dix , 1991 cited in S,Scott;D,Morgan 1993). This affected the value placed on the different dance styles.
Street Dance
Step Up Clip
Solidarity and Sense of Belonging
Originally dance was mainly social orientated so how did dance and in particular youth dance become politically orientated or action orientated and perceived as resisting authority or structures in society? Social dance is dancing as an activity not for a performance such as theatrical dance.

This is done to show skill or tell stories. Participatory dance is engaged in mainly for the emotional expression for individual dancers. What is the function of dance? The functions of dance vary from culture to culture, era, dance form, age and gender (Dethier, 1996, Web Ref 2)


It is interesting to explore why young people dance and join dance subcultures and continue to do so when there are negative associations attached to the dance style. The main reasons dancers cited were a forum for personal creativity , an emotional experience , a nonverbal communication or a form of self-expression(Dethier , 1996; Fowler &Little, 1977; Hawkins, 1982; H’Doubler , 1940;Kraus et al ; 1991; Montague, 19780.
Identity and Dance
The main reasons dancers cited were a forum for personal creativity , an emotional experience , a nonverbal communication or a form of self-expression(Dethier , 1996; Fowler &Little, 1977; Hawkins, 1982; H’Doubler , 1940;Kraus et al ; 1991; Montague, 1978 cited in L.B, Hendry; J.Shucksmith; J.G; Love; A, Glendinng 1993).

Youth identity is a key notion embodied in dance culture; young people that dance use the sphere of dance to explore and express their identity but also play out other characters, playing different. Roles allow the dancer to put on different masks these mask become the different faces and characters the dancer wants to embody and can be encapsulated in the dance movements accompanied by the music to convey the message and story (Nieminen, P 1998).

The dance thus becomes not just a realm of dance movement but a performance of dance were different characters are displayed. The monolithic styles of dancing allow the dancer to change the way they want to dance to reflect the various styles of dance. Dance allows the dancer to explore personas they may not necessarily obtain, they use the dance as a free sphere to do this as it does not impinge on their self and give them the opportunity to act out and take on different identities freely without impinging on their self-image. Goffman explores people’s self-identity and performance. Identity is a key concept in youth, is of significance in how dances explore their identity through using the medium of dance and even how group identities are formulated (Nieminen, P 1998).

Dance Subcultures
Dance Subcultures - How did they emerge / Why are they different from other types of dance ?



Initially most dance was social done as part of an activity not for a performance such as C. This s competitive dance / theatrical dance , the main goal of the dancing was to show skill or tell stories. Participatory dance is engaged in mainly for the emotional expression for individual dancers (J.Foras; G.Bolin 1995).

Dance subcultures emerged as a response to classical forms of dancing such as ballet and ballroom , many dancers felt these dance restrictive and were less about movement and more about making shapes thus they constructed a new style of dance which was less restrictive and empowered the dancer freedom to create and customize their dance based on inspiration and utilize a combination of dance techniques (J.Foras; G.Bolin 1995).






It is interesting to explore why young people dance within youth subcultures and continue to do so when there are negative associations attached to the dance style (Dethier, 1996 cited in L.B, Hendry; J.Shucksmith; J.G; Love; A, Glendinng 1993).


Dance has always been apart of youth subculture fabric like music and fashion styles , it is a medium 'deviant youth; have incorporated into their culture and has been used a s a tool of resistance and sphere to escape have fun and imprint a code of conduct for instance street dance can be linked to gang subculture and deprived youths and this is evident in the dance culture and embodied in the movements and choreography of particular performances , incorporating a social body to the dance ( Dethier , 1996; Fowler &Little, 1977 cited in L.B, Hendry; J.Shucksmith; J.G; Love; A, Glendinng 1993).
Step Up - Street Dance
This clip of the movie embodies how street dance has evolved to not be just a solo performance into a collective group of dancers embodying a social message this show's how youth subcultures use dance to reflect social economic problems as a ritual of resistance to the authorities and corporations(J.Foras; G.Boli1995;J, Sherlock 1998 ;
P, Willis 1990; Web Ref 2).

Dance can be used as a form of protest, collective embodiment and resistance to authority. According to van dyke (1992, p 1) modern dance such as street dance has ‘consistently sought significance in the contemporary world…protecting its belief in the individual’ Modern dance is particularly difficult to define as it has no monolithic single form of movement , as is extensively holistic in its artistic vision as the individual is at the core of modern dance, leading to many dance choreographers creating their own style and technique of movement (J.Foras; G.Boli1995;J, Sherlock 1998 ;
P, Willis 1990).

The collective identity embodied in the dance becomes a powerful resource tool used for dances to engage with other performers, create a group identity and can be a bases for much solidarity and help for the individual performer thus the dance group becomes a community for the dances a place they can interact with other who share their dance enthusiasm and understand the pressures and realities of the dance world and performing(J.Foras; G.Boli1995;J, Sherlock 1998 ;
P, Willis 1990).

Urban street dance youth subcultures, embodied both collective and individualistic forms of expression in their dance styles as many dances have their own signature dance styles , whilst collectively group dace . This diverse mixture of several dances styles, ways of performing and freestyle in street dance has led to the emergence of different dance groups and dance battles (J.Foras; G.Boli1995;J, Sherlock 1998 ;
P, Willis 1990) .


Bibliography
L.B, Hendry; J.Shucksmith; J.G; Love; A, Glendinng (1993) Young People’s Leisure and Lifestyles, New Fetter Lane London: Routledge.
J.Foras; G.Bolin (Eds.) (1995) Youth, Culture in Modernity, London: Sage.
J, Sherlock (1998) Dance and the culture of the body, London: Routledge.
P, Willis (1990) Moving Culture An Enquiry into the cultural activities of young people, London: Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation.
Nieminen, P (1998) Four Dance Subcultures, A study of Non-Professional Dancers Socialization Participation Motives, Attitudes and Stereotypes, University of Jyvaskyla: Jyvaskyla.


(Web Ref 1)http://books.google.co.uk/books?id=PiY116aKK40C&pg=PA3&lpg=PA3&dq=dance+and+youth+sociology&source=bl&ots=1KQcw_NeY8&sig=-Lrxe4vwgEYaFES_F1GTYyt4q3U&hl=en&sa=X&ei=BbgLU47-I4it7QaN0oGwBA&ved=0CDIQ6AEwAA#v=onepage&q=dance%20and%20youth%20sociology&f=false
[Accessed 15/03/2014].

(Web Ref 2)http://books.google.co.uk/books?id=-UTB41Prh8oC&pg=PA225&lpg=PA225&dq=J,+Sherlock+(1998)+Dance+and+the+culture+of+the+body&source=bl&ots=275seD-3JA&sig=ULnkAqwS9--0X8eFuedDy_qfzCA&hl=en&sa=X&ei=sl0qU864OK3J0AW6q4CQAw&ved=0CDQQ6AEwAQ#v=onepage&q=J%2C%20Sherlock%20(1998)%20Dance%20and%20the%20culture%20of%20the%20body&f=false [Accessed 15/03/2014].




What is the function of dance? The functions of dance vary from culture to culture, era, dance
form, age and gender (Dethier, 1996)
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