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How to write a Hook

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by

Megan Lister

on 7 November 2013

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Transcript of How to write a Hook

How to write a Hook
The other
morning, my brother Danny—
who just got his license last
month—was driving me to
school. Danny’s cell phone
started beeping and he checked
the incoming text message,
dropping the toast he was
eating and nearly driving off
the road in the process
ANECDOTE
An anecdote is a short story. It
can be a story about your own
experience or someone else’s
experience. Use an anecdote to
make a point
QUOTE
A quote, or quotation, is a
passage that you use in your
own writing that was originally
written or spoken by someone
else. You indicate a quote
by putting quotation marks
around it and acknowledging
its source.
“We were always
together, but not as much
after she got her license,” Gayle
Bell says. “If I could bring her
back I’d lasso the moon.” Bell’s
16-year-old daughter, Jessie,
rolled her car into a ditch and
died in 2003.
Use sensory details to describe
a scene, giving your reader an
immediate sense of time and
place.
DROP YOUR READER INTO A SCENE
A video about
defensive driving drones
from the TV at the front of the darkened classroom. It’s warm, and several of the teenagers have drifted off to sleep. Others quietly text their friends, their cell phones glowing between
their cupped hands.
SURPRISING FACT
A surprising fact is an
interesting piece of
information that your readers aren’t likely to know. It’s a statement that will make your readers say, “Really?”
The rate of crashes for 16-year-old drivers is almost 10 times the rate for older drivers.
RHETORICAL QUESTION
A rhetorical question is a
statement in the form of a
question. You ask a rhetorical
question to make a point, not
to get an answer
What’s more important: Driving as soon as possible or saving lives?
The opening line or lines of an essay,
article, or story.

These lines should hook the reader’s attention and make him or her want to continue reading.
What is a Hook?
Which type of Hook is this?
Where in the Pacific Ocean can you find a delicious Krabby Patty to eat, live in a pineapple, and drive in an underwater boat? Bikini Bottom, of course!
QUESTION
What kind of Hook is this?
"Do you smell that? That smell--It's the smell of a smelly smell that smells smelly," stated Spongebob from the show Spongebob Squarepants.
QUOTE
What kind of Hook is this?
Over 1 million adults and children worldwide tune in to watch the TV show, Spongebob Squarepants on a weekly basis
Surprising Fact
What kind of Hook is this?
Officer Ryan just missed the ledge as he leapt across buildings while pursuing the suspect. Thinking as he fell, "I hate mondays."
Anecdote
What kind of Hook is this?
The hallway was cold. The darkness seemed to be creeping up and the silence around me made my ears ring.
Drop your reader into a scene
Which one is it?
Full transcript