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Isadora Duncan

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Zoe Atkins

on 16 November 2012

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Transcript of Isadora Duncan

By Sarah Lopez, Andi McCloud, You Na Lee, and Zoe Atkins Isadora Duncan History Works Cited Isadora Angela Duncan was born in San Francisco on May 27, 1877.
Youngest of four siblings, with divorced parents.
Her mother, a pianist, inspired her dances.
Duncan never recieved formal ballet lessons, however, began teaching her first class at the age of 6 to help support her family (www.lkwdpl.org). Isadora established many schools, within the United States as well as throughout Europe. However, many of these failed quickly.
The first of her many schools was founded in Grunewald, Germany. This is where she established the famous dance group the Isadorables. Schooling Work "Much more important, though, was the ground she opened up for other dance pioneers. Martha Graham's stark, serious moderinsm may have evolved far beyond Duncan's rapsodies. But it was Duncan who proved that dance could be taken seriously outside the ballet academy and that a solo woman could take charge of her career" (guardian.co.uk)
"Isadora Duncan's genius inspired other modern dancers of her time to create their own individual styles; the far-reaching influence of Isadora's dance, however, was not limited to the stage. All the arts were reaching out in new directions, searching for new and exciting forms of expression and inspiration — they found Isadora Duncan." (www.isadoraduncan.org)
Isadora Duncan’s emphasis on freedom of movement and seeing dance as an extension of the inner self continues to have a great influence on modern and interpretive dance. (www.articlemyriad.com) Influence on Others Belilove, Lori. "About Isadora Duncan." Isadora Duncan Dance Foundation. N.p., n.d. Web. 14 Nov. 2012. <http://www.isadoraduncan.org/about_isadora.html>.
"Chapther 2: The Solo Dancers." University of Pittsburgh. N.p., n.d. Web. 14 Nov. 2012. <http://www.pitt.edu/~gillis/dance/isadora.html>.
Durham, Valerie. "The Dance of Isadora Duncan." Bourgeon. N.p., n.d. Web. 14 Nov. 2012. <http://bourgeononline.com/2008/08/the-dance-of-isadora-duncan-by-valerie-durham/>.
"Isadora Duncan." Women in History. Lakewood Public Library, n.d. Web. 14 Nov. 2012. <http://www.lkwdpl.org/wihohio/dunc-isa.htm>.
"Isadora Duncan International Institute, Inc.." About Isadora Duncan. N.p., n.d. Web. 14 Nov. 2012. <http://www.isadoraduncan.net/isadora.html>.
Ritter, Mario. "Isadora Duncan: The Mother of Modern Dance." Voice of America. N.p., n.d. Web. 14 Nov. 2012. <learningenglish.voanews.com/content/isadora-duncan-1877-1927-the-mother-of-modern-dance-101714348/114147.html>.
Sutton, Valerie. "Isadora Duncan Biography." DanceWriting: Read and Write Dance. N.p., n.d. Web. 14 Nov. 2012. <http://www.dancewriting.org/library/duncan/prelude/prelude03.html>. Philosophy Duncan used Greek mythology in her dances. "She understood and sought the roots of her inspiration in ancient Greek ideals and in their antecedents within mysteries." (isadoraduncan.net).
She strived to make dance moves look natural, unlike the stiff movements of ballet.
Duncan aspired to achieve the natural, weighted, strong movements of the Greek figure. (bourge.com)
The motion of her dances were inspired by the connection of movement and emotion. Works Cited Belilove, Lori. "About Isadora Duncan." Isadora Duncan Dance Foundation. N.p., n.d. Web. 14 Nov. 2012. <http://www.isadoraduncan.org/about_isadora.html>.
"Chapther 2: The Solo Dancers." University of Pittsburgh. N.p., n.d. Web. 14 Nov. 2012. <http://www.pitt.edu/~gillis/dance/isadora.html>.
Durham, Valerie. "The Dance of Isadora Duncan." Bourgeon. N.p., n.d. Web. 14 Nov. 2012. <http://bourgeononline.com/2008/08/the-dance-of-isadora-duncan-by-valerie-durham/>.
"Isadora Duncan." Women in History. Lakewood Public Library, n.d. Web. 14 Nov. 2012. <http://www.lkwdpl.org/wihohio/dunc-isa.htm>.
"Isadora Duncan International Institute, Inc.." About Isadora Duncan. N.p., n.d. Web. 14 Nov. 2012. <http://www.isadoraduncan.net/isadora.html>.
Ritter, Mario. "Isadora Duncan: The Mother of Modern Dance." Voice of America. N.p., n.d. Web. 14 Nov. 2012. <learningenglish.voanews.com/content/isadora-duncan-1877-1927-the-mother-of-modern-dance-101714348/114147.html>.
Sutton, Valerie. "Isadora Duncan Biography." DanceWriting: Read and Write Dance. N.p., n.d. Web. 14 Nov. 2012. <http://www.dancewriting.org/library/duncan/prelude/prelude03.html>. Isadora began her professional career in 1896, when she was cast as Titania in Augustin Daly's production of 'A Midsummer Night's Dream'.
She traveled to Europe with Daly's company, and years after to Berlin where she began compiling a new kind of dance philosophy.
She liberated the body from the unnatural constraints of the corsets, tutu’s, toe shoes, and rigid postures of early 20th century ballet and defied the social and moral conventions of her day.She is known as the “the mother of modern dance”
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