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Expository Paragraph Structure

Del Oro High School / English 9
by

Joel Agee

on 9 November 2015

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Transcript of Expository Paragraph Structure

an Expository Paragraph
a paragraph is
a group of sentences
that all discuss the same
topic
a group of sentences
that center around one

main idea
expository
refers to
something that
explains
is
a group of sentences
that work together
to
explain/support
an opinion about
one specific topic

Expository
Paragraphs
must
define the topic
provide examples
explain how the examples
prove that the topic is correct
Topic Sentence
(TS)
Evidence and
Integrated Quotes
(IQ)
Integrated Quotes
(IQ)
Lead Ins
(LI) provide context/background information for the quote
TIE
(Tag / Introduce / Embed) helps you integrate quotes smoothly into your own writing
Commentary
(CM)
Concluding
Sentence
(CS)
Transitional
words/phrases
pulling it all
together

Expository
Paragraph
Outline
PowerPoint
Handout
Resources
Practice
1.
Read
this entire sample paragraph first. Read your printed copy.
2.
Then
click
through the Prezi,
read
and
copy on the paragraph:

- the
label

(TS, LI, TIE, CM, CS)
for what each sentence is doing
-
all of the notes
for what each sentence is doing (it's a lot of
writing, so write small)
Sentence (1) is the
Topic Sentence
(TS)
Zaroff is cruel
is this paragraph's opinion
so
all
sentences in this paragraph
must
somehow
connect to
Zaroff
and/or
cruelty
Sentence (2) is a
Lead In
(LI)
This sentence gives
background information
to
set up the quote in Sentence (3).
This sentence sets up the
who/what/when/where/why
of
the quote in Sentence (3);
otherwise, that quote won't make sense.
Also, the
underlined part
of the sentence is a
transitional phrase
that makes the idea flow more smoothly from the TS to this example.
Sentence (3) is a
Lead In
(LI)
and a
TIE
This sentence first gives more
background information
to
set up the quote
(i.e. it's continuing the Lead In from Sentence (2)...
...and then it
integrates a quote
from the story that shows an example of the opinion
Zaroff is cruel.
Sentences (4-6) are
Commentary
(CM)
These sentences explain why
the quote in Sentence (3)
proves that the opinion
Zaroff is cruel
is correct.
These sentences
don't just retell the story,
they explain the quote in several ways: by
defining what "cruelty" means
(4), then by
using this definition
to prove that what Zaroff is doing
specifically

in this quote
is
causing pain in others for his own pleasure
(5-6).
Sentence (7) is another
Lead In
(LI)
Firstly, the
underlined part
of the sentence is a
transitional phrase
that lets the reader know that we're all done talking about the first quote/example, and now it's time to talk about a different example.
This sentence gives
background information
to
set up the quote in Sentence (8).
This sentence must set up the
who/what/when/where/why
of
the quote in Sentence (8);
otherwise, that quote won't make sense.
Sentence (8) is a
Lead In
(LI)
and a
TIE
This sentence first gives a little more
background information
to
set up the quote
(i.e. it's continuing the Lead In from Sentence (7)...
...and then it
integrates another quote
from the story that shows an example of the opinion
Zaroff is cruel.
Sentences (9-11) are
Commentary
(CM)
These sentences explain why
the quote in Sentence (8)
proves that the opinion
Zaroff is cruel
is correct.
These sentences
don't just retell the story,
they explain the quote in several ways: still using the
definition of "cruelty" from Sentence (4)
, Sentences (9-11) explain that what Zaroff is doing
specifically in this SECOND quote
is
causing pain in others for his own pleasure (i.e. being cruel).
Sentence (12) is a
Concluding Sentence
(CS)
This sentence connects back to the
Topic Sentence (TS).
It reviews/restates the main idea this paragraph was trying to prove, that
Zaroff is cruel.
Full transcript