Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

Figurative Language

No description
by

Alyssa Diaz

on 7 October 2013

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Figurative Language

Figurative Language
August 2026: There Will Come Soft Rains
By: Alexis, Alyssa, Dinah, Kris, and Xana

Alliteration
Alliteration is re-occurrence of the same letter or same sound at the beginning of words.
Metaphor
Metaphor is a comparison of two or more subjects.
Similes
Similes are a comparison between two or more subjects using like or as.
Personification
Personification is when you give human like qualities to inanimate objects.
Imagery
Imagery is a visual description.
What do these figurative languages add to the story?
These figurative languages add to the story by making the story sound like a machien by giving repeating sounds (alliterations) and being very descriptive to create the scene in your head.
What would the story be like WITHOUT figurative language?

From attic trapdoors, blind robot faces peered down with faucet mouth
gu
shing
gr
een chemicals.
Ra
in,
ra
in, go away,
ru
bber
ra
incoats for today...
The
di
rty
di
shes were
dr
opped into a hot washer and emerged twinkling dry.
Examples:
The
house was an alter
with 10,000 attendants, big, small, servicing, attending, in choirs.
The house was an alter with
10,000 attendants
, big, small, servicing, attending, in choirs.
he house shuddered, oak bone on bone, its bared skeleton cringing from the heat,
its wires, its nerves
revealed as if a surgeon had torn the skin off to let the red veins and capillaries quiver in the scalded air.
Heat snapped mirrors
like
the brittle winter ice.
The fire backed off,
as
even an elephant must at the sight of a dead snake.
At eight thirty the eggs were shriveled and the toast was
like
stone.
Examples:
Now the
fire lay in beds
,
stood in windows,
changed the colors of drapes.
But the
fire was clever
.
At ten o'clock the
house began to die
.

The dog, once
huge and fleshy
, but now gone to
bone and covered with sores
, moved in and through the house,
tracking mud
.
The dog
frothed at the mouth
, lying at the door, sniffing, its
eyes turned to fire
.
Animals took shape; yellow giraffes, blue lions, pink antelopes, lilac panthers, cavorting into crystal substance
.
Examples:
Examples:
Examples:
If the story did not have figurative language, it would be very boring and hard to imagine what the story would look (such as the fire vs. house fight) like.
Questions:


1. What does alliteration add to the story?
2. What purpose does the figurative language serve in this story?
3. How does figurative language in this story compare to Fahrenheit 451?
4. How does not adding characters to this story, help add to figurative language?
5. What are the five main parts of figurative language that Ray Bradbury used in this story and which one is used the most?
Full transcript