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The Late 1800's and Early 1900's of Texas

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on 24 March 2014

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Transcript of The Late 1800's and Early 1900's of Texas

The Dust Bowl, sometimes referred to as the Dirty Thirties, was an era of majorly destructive dust storms, severely damaging the agriculture of the US and Canadian prairies during the 1930s.
World War I
The Dust Bowl
The "Roaring Twenties"
Spindletop and the Discovery of Oil
During the 1920’s, Texas became a modern society by its employment rate greatly increasing, more jobs being made available, multiple movies airing, music, such as jazz was being introduced, and so much more. Education was improving, women were voting, people were investing in the stock markets, and everybody was having the time of their lives.
Spindletop was a salt dome field located in southern Beaumont, Texas that became a boomtown when oil was struck.
Oil companies including Texaco, Gulf, and Mobil as well as 600 others were established when oil replaced lumber as the leading Texas industry. Oil proved as a new source of inexpensive, efficient fuel, and it profoundly changed the future of the transportation industry.
$1.25
Monday, February 17, 2014
Vol XCIII, No. 311
Effects of the Horrific Disaster
The Galveston Hurricane
Women's Suffrage and Improvement in Education
The Galveston Hurricane reins as the most fatal natural disaster in the United States. Nearly 8,000 deaths were recorded, an unfortunate 1/6 of the population. Damage amounted to a grand estimate of 30 million dollars, and it fell behind as a leading port city, resulting in Houston taking its place later on following the discovery of an oil boom.
The Late 1800's and Early 1900's of Texas
In 1915, the Lusitania sank due to Germany’s attack, resulting in roughly 124 passengers confirmed dead. This caused tensions to arise in the U.S. considering Germany and the Central powers. Later, tensions increased even more when the U.S. intercepted word of Zimmerman’s telegram, which stated that if Mexican troops attacked the U.S., they would obtain U.S. land. Without much debate, the United States instantaneously declared war on the Central Powers and aligned with the Allies, instigating their first involvement in WWI, besides sending the Central Powers and Allies weaponry prior.
Women worked to ban child labor and other social reforms, but were not allowed, so they established the Texas Woman Suffrage Association (later called the Texas Equal Suffrage Association in 1903)
In an effort to improve education, Texas set aside land, and in 1854, the republic set aside a permanent school endowment. They also created the constitution of 1876, which set aside funds from the sale of public lands, and reserved other tax proceeds for schools.
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