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The Beginning of The Internet

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Tiannie Alexander

on 5 May 2010

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Transcript of The Beginning of The Internet

The Beginning Of The Internet





1976
Dr. Robert M. Metcalfe develops Ethernet, which allowed coaxial cable to move data extremely fast. This was a crucial component to the development of LANs.
The packet satellite project went into practical use. SATNET, Atlantic packet Satellite network, was born. This network linked the United States with Europe. Surprisingly, it used INTELSAT satellites that were owned by a consortium of countries and not exclusively the United States government.
UUCP (Unix-to-Unix Copy) developed at AT&T Bell Labs and distributed with UNIX one year later.
The Department of Defense began to experiment with the TCP/IP protocol and soon decided to require it for use on ARPANET.
1976
Dr. Robert M. Metcalfe develops Ethernet, which allowed coaxial cable to move data extremely fast. This was a crucial component to the development of LANs.
The packet satellite project went into practical use. SATNET, Atlantic packet Satellite network, was born. This network linked the United States with Europe. Surprisingly, it used INTELSAT satellites that were owned by a consortium of countries and not exclusively the United States government.
UUCP (Unix-to-Unix Copy) developed at AT&T Bell Labs and distributed with UNIX one year later.
The Department of Defense began to experiment with the TCP/IP protocol and soon decided to require it for use on ARPANET.
ARPA awarded the ARPANET contract to BBN. BBN had selected a Honeywell minicomputer as the base on which they would build the switch. The physical network was constructed in 1969, linking four nodes: University of California at Los Angeles, SRI (in Stanford), University of California at Santa Barbara, and University of Utah. The network was wired together via 50 Kbps circuits.
1968
ARPA awarded the ARPANET contract to BBN.
1962
RAND Paul Baran, of the RAND Corporation (a government agency),

1976
Dr. Robert M. Metcalfe develops Ethernet, which allowed coaxial cable to move data extremely fast. Atlantic packet Satellite network, was born. This network linked the United States with Europe. o 1979
USENET (the decentralized news group network) was created by Steve Bellovin; a graduated student at the University of North Carolina (U.N.C), and the people who programmed it was Tom Truscott and Jim Ellis
. It was based on UUCP.
The Creation of BITNET, by IBM, "Because it’s Time Network", introduced the "store and forward" network.
It was used for email and listservs. 1994There are no major changes made to the network. The most significant thing that happened was the growth. "Packet switching is the breaking down of data into datagrams and the destination of the information and the forwarding of these packets from one computer to another until the information arrives at its final destination.” gtgdfg E-Mail Electronic Mail works in much the same way as traditional mail Anyone is allowed to sign up for an email address What is the Internet? The Internet today is a large-scale network of millions of computers that allows continuous communication across the globe. The various applications of the Internet are The foundations of the Internet were formed when packet-switching networks came into operation in the 1960s. Computers at the time were massive, primitive structures. It was only in 1991 that what we now call the World-Wide Web was introduced, developed by Tim Berners-Lee, with assistance from Robert Caillau.. Tim saw the need for a standard linked information system accessible across the range of different computers in use. He got some pages up and was able to access them with his 'browser'. Quickly researchers got interested and started designing web sites and browsers Quickly services were set up for domain registration and sites began turning up on the web Even at this stage, malicious viruses and worms were infiltrating computers connected to the Internet. The web had an incredible 341, 634% annual growth rate Important sites like the White House and Pizza Hut appeared. Online shopping sites showed up. The www was quickly the most popular service on the Internet. It was around 1995 when the first large ISPs like AOL and CompuServe began offering Internet access to the masses.
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