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SBA Brief Writes

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Karen Love

on 22 April 2018

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Transcript of SBA Brief Writes

SBA Brief Writes: Writing Across Content Areas
Three Modes:
Argumentative
Explanatory (Informational)
Narrative
Explanatory (Informational)
This is science, social studies, and mathematics' primary form of writing. Encourage narrative anecdotes to set the tone and support thesis.
Narrative
Rubric: Narrative Opening
Rubric: Narrative Elaboration
2 points: The response:
provides appropriate and mainly specific descriptive details and/or dialogue
provides adequate development of experiences, characters, setting, action,and/or events
uses adequate sensory, concrete, and/or figurative language
is mostly “shown”
Rubric: Introduction (Explanatory)
Rubric: Elaboration (Explanatory)
Rubric: Argumentative Introduction
Rubric: Argumentative Elaboration
Argumentative
Rubric: Argumentative Conclusion
Rubric: Conclusion (Explanatory)
Rubric: Narrative Conclusion
Suggestions:

Allow and encourage students to write a connecting anecdote to introduce a topic for any content area. (Think about how many TEDTalks begin with an anecdote to draw the listener in to the main thesis.)

Use RAFTS to create engaging writing prompts via any subject area.

The response:
• provides an adequate opening or introduction to the narrative that may establish setting and/or point of view,* set up the action to come, establish the mood/tone,** and/or introduce the narrator and/or other characters for audience and purpose
• adequately connects to or sets up the body of the narrative

The response:
• provides an opening or introduction to the narrative that may partially establish setting and/or point of view,* or partially set up the action to come, partially establish the mood/tone,** and/or partially introduce the narrator and/or other characters
• provides a limited and/or awkward connection to the body of the narrative

2 points
1 Point:
This is called 'exposition.' You can still teach these literary terms/academic language.
Preamble - A lead-in to set up the audience and purpose of the stimulus
Stimulus - Student models of brief, incomplete writing drafts developed by item writers. Stimuli model authentic student writing for each grade-level.
Item Stem - A target focused statement prompting students to add an introduction, conclusion, or evidence/elaboration to the provided stimulus.
0:
The response:
*provides a minimal opening or introduction to the narrative that may fail to establishsetting and/or point of view,* and/or fail to set up the action to come, fail toestablish the mood/tone,** and/or fail to introduce the narrator and/or othercharacters
*provides no connection to the body of the narrative
1 point:
The response:
provides mostly general descriptive details and little or no dialogue, and mayinclude extraneous details that are unrelated or only loosely related
provides limited development of experiences, characters, setting, action, and/orevents
uses limited sensory, concrete, and/or figurative language
is somewhat “told”
0 points:
The response:
includes few if any descriptive details and little or no dialogue. Details that areincluded may be vague, repetitive, incorrect, or interfere with the meaning of thenarrative
provides minimal, if any, development of experiences, characters, setting, action,and/or events
uses little or no sensory, concrete, and/or figurative language
is mostly “told”
The Big Idea:
"List-Y" is the key 'look for'
Precise language:
specific to the writing task/audience.
The writer is in control.
Use close reading to establish claims as mentor texts, etc.
Try this:
Science: Argue for hypothesis
Math: Argumentative writing in proofs
PE/Health, Electives: Argumentative writing for choice of project/activity/task
Social Studies: any social justice issue
Try This:
Science: focus on 'controlling idea' - thesis
Math: focus on explaining process
Social Studies: explain connections between past and present
Electives: 'how to' do just about any process
PE/Health: explain cause/effects of health related activities/issues
Big Ideas:

Big Ideas:
CONTROLLING IDEA:
Narrative encompasses unexpected texts --from personal narratives to campfire stories and origin myths.
Allow for exploration of narrative writing in the sciences/math fields of study.
How did this scientist work? What questions did she ask? What stories did she uncover?
http://lookupwriting.edublogs.org/
https://www.tumblr.com/following/125
http://lookupwriting.edublogs.org/2016/02/19/story-starter-15-guest/
"Argumentative writing isn’t persuasion, and it’s not about conflict or winning. Instead, it’s about creating a claim and supporting that claim with evidence."
http://www.weareteachers.com/blogs/post/2015/03/13/making-a-claim-teaching-students-argument-writing-through-close-reading
Explanatory writing focuses on controlling idea, thesis, precise supporting details, and the 'so what' idea of what it matters.
Narrative writing gives depth and connections to experiences via development which allows the reader to make meaning via 'transactional' engagement. Good narrative writing 'shows' and not 'tells.'
There are limitless prompts or ideas to explore.
https://visualwritingprompts.wordpress.com/category/subjects/science/
Credits:
Music: The Greatest: Vitamin String Quartet

SBA Brief Writes Rubrics: https://www.smarterbalanced.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/08/ELA-Brief-Write-Rubrics.pdf
Full transcript