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weight distribution throughout your body

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stretch denning

on 27 October 2014

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Transcript of weight distribution throughout your body

nutrition for weight loss
weight distribution throughout your body
Being overweight or underweight are characteristics depending on many factors: you are genetically overweight if you have a family history of overweight parents/relatives.

Also, the nervous system plays an important role in balancing the body weight: serotonin and endorphins send signals to the brain that induce the need to eat or on the contrary.

There is also the CCK hormone which transmits the brain signals on the state of satiety - it decreases hunger.

While generally, body weight is influenced genetically, hormonally and by the body maintenance condition (the activity routine), it seems that the fat distribution is influenced by age, genetic inheritance, race, but to a greater extent by gender specific hormones.

They are responsible for the distribution of fat in certain zones of our bodies: thus, estrogens which are responsible of the typical female sexual characteristics will influence the fat deposition in the pear format, favouring its laying on the hips, thighs, and belly, while testosterone will 'lead' fat mostly towards tummy and upper body.

It is clear that increased body fat affects health, the news is that its distribution on the body influences the state of health of specific organs.

According to its placement, fat can be subcutaneous (under the skin) or visceral (around organs). The greatest concern is generated by visceral fat that can interfere with the good functioning of vital organs. There is a relationship between overall fat deposits and specific fat deposits: fat around the body middle section is associated with visceral fat, so, abdominal fat is the most serious health risk.

The waist to hip ratio is a method of determining whether there are excessive amounts of upper body fat. It is obtained by dividing the waist measurement by the hip measurement. The upper limits are:.95 for men and .80 for women. Any exceeding values should be alarming.
properly loosing fat
And in that case, assuming your goal is to lose fat without losing muscle, I’d say strength training 100% of the time.

Why? Because of the two, it’s the only form of weight training (or really the only form of exercise in general) that is actually required for this goal.

What I mean is, unless you’re significantly overweight (in which case muscle loss is much less of an issue or concern), you will lose muscle and strength in a deficit if the type of strength training described above isn’t there. However, you can VERY easily lose fat without ever doing a second of metabolic training.

So, one is required and the other is purely optional. For this reason alone, strength training wins the battle of the workouts.

Now that’s not to say metabolic training can’t also be important or highly beneficial. It most definitely can be if it’s your preferred way of creating your caloric deficit. But, if you’re only going to be doing one or the other, the clear choice here would be to skip the metabolic stuff in favor of strength training and use your diet to create your deficit.

Fat still gets lost, muscle and strength get maintained… you win.

basal metabolic rate
ways to lose fat
And in that case, assuming your goal is to lose fat without losing muscle, I’d say strength training 100% of the time.

Why? Because of the two, it’s the only form of weight training (or really the only form of exercise in general) that is actually required for this goal.

What I mean is, unless you’re significantly overweight (in which case muscle loss is much less of an issue or concern), you will lose muscle and strength in a deficit if the type of strength training described above isn’t there. However, you can VERY easily lose fat without ever doing a second of metabolic training.

So, one is required and the other is purely optional. For this reason alone, strength training wins the battle of the workouts.

Now that’s not to say metabolic training can’t also be important or highly beneficial. It most definitely can be if it’s your preferred way of creating your caloric deficit. But, if you’re only going to be doing one or the other, the clear choice here would be to skip the metabolic stuff in favor of strength training and use your diet to create your deficit.

Fat still gets lost, muscle and strength get maintained… you win.

starvation mode
We’re all guilty of saying “I’m starving!” if we work through lunch or miss breakfast. Especially if we go on a low calorie diet like the Military Diet, forsaking an order of fries for half a grapefruit. We’ve all heard that skipping a meal or two, or reducing calories on a diet will put your body into the dreaded Starvation Mode. This misinformation, often reported as FACT, claims that your body will think it is starving and your metabolism will stop. Then, everything you eat will be stored as fat as your body tries to preserve itself. And, ultimately, you will gain weight instead of lose weight. However, all of the above couldn’t be further from the truth! Going into “starvation mode” is the number one myth about the Military Diet.
Basal metabolic rate (BMR), and the closely related resting metabolic rate (RMR), is the rate of energy expenditure by humans and other animals at rest, and is measured in kJ per hour per kg body mass. Rest is defined as existing in a neutrally temperate environment while in the post-absorptive state
At a fundamental level, “obesity” (or an unhealthy increase in excess adipose or “fat” tissue stored in the body) is the result of an imbalance in a simple equation:

(Energy Intake) + (Energy Expenditure) = +/- Body Weight

This energy balance equation says that, when energy intake exceeds the amount of energy required for a given level of activity, the excess energy is stored as adipose (fat) tissue. On the other hand, when energy output exceeds energy intake, existing fat tissue is used as supplemental fuel (and weight loss can occur). These fundamental principles are true regardless of whether the excess energy exists because of high energy intake or because of low energy expenditure (or both). They are also true regardless of the source of the excess calories or the reasons for relatively low energy output. To the extent that popular or “fad” diets are effective, they “work” within the constraints of this energy balance equation; they cannot go around it.

what contributes to weight gain
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