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Getting Away with Murder: The True Story of the Emmett Till Case

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Brooke Jaundalderis

on 11 December 2013

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Transcript of Getting Away with Murder: The True Story of the Emmett Till Case

Getting Away with Murder: The True Story of the Emmett Till Case
By: Chris Crowe

Argument
Counterargument
The murder, trial, and acquittal of the suspects of the Emmett Till case acts as the catalyst of the Civil Rights Movement.

Refutation:
The Emmett Till case took place in 1955, and the Brown v. Board of Education took place in 1954. Since the Brown v. Board took place first, then it would have been more likely to influence the start of the Civil Rights Movement.
Conclusion
We learned about the story of Emmett Till and how his murderers got away
Made an argument against a strong case
We also learned about segregation in the South, and how much the North and South differed in treatment of blacks
Found minor arguments when the author only had one main argument
Learned how to make an argument against something we may agree with
Works Cited
Crowe, Chris. Getting Away with Murder: The True Story of the Emmett Till Case. New York: Phyllis Fogelman, 2003. Print.

"History of Brown v. Board of Education." US Courts. US Federal Judiciary, n.d. Web. 09 Dec. 2013.

Patterson, James T. Brown v. Board of Education: A Civil Rights Milestone and Its Troubled Legacy.
Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2002. 10 Dec. 2013.


Rhetorical Precis
Chicago-born author, Chris Crowe in his book, Getting Away with Murder: The True Story of the Emmett Till Case, argues that the murder of a Chicago teen, Emmett Till, was fueled by Southern racism and acted as the catalyst for the Civil Rights Movement. He supports his claim by using cause-and-effect organization to show why the murder occurred and how it affected society and the beginning of the Civil Rights Movement. Crowe's purpose is to inform about the murder, trial, and effects of the Emmett Till case in order to prove it was the catalyst for the Civil Rights Movement. He adopts an informative tone for his intended audience of teenagers.
Claim #1
Unified northern whites and blacks under one common cause

"Public opinion polls. . . seemed to reveal steadily increasing support among northern whites for liberal policies concerning race: in 1942, 40 percent of white people in the North believed that "white students and Negro students should go to the same schools"; by 1956, 61 percent thought so" (Patterson).
Claim #2
Showed the intensity of Southern racism

"In Greenwood, Mississippi, Judge Tom P. Brady delivered a passionate speech to white segregationists that decried the Supreme Court's ruling, emphasized the inferiority of the African race, and predicted the destruction of the South if integration were allowed to happen" (Crowe 29-30).
Background
The Brown v. Board of Education is the catalyst of the Civil Rights Movement.
Took place in Topeka, Kansas in 1951-1954

Declared that segregation in public schools was
unconstitutional because it violated the Equal Protection clause in the 14th Amendment

Overturned the ruling of Plessy v.. Ferguson case of 1896 which supported state-sponsored segregation
Full transcript