Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

Narrative Writing & Elements of Literature

No description
by

Tiffany Davis

on 20 August 2014

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Narrative Writing & Elements of Literature

Step 2
Define the Conflict:
What is the main problem the character faces?
Is the conflict an internal one or an external one? (It can be a mixture of both)
Step 3
Depict characters vividly:
What do your characters look like?
What do they think and say?
How do they act?
What vivid details can show readers what the characters are like?
Narrative Writing &
Elements of Literature

Second Option for Organization: Character
Chronological order is the most common way to organize a narrative. However, you may wish to focus more directly on character.
design by Dóri Sirály for Prezi
What is a narrative?
Tells a story
Can be fictional (written from one's imagination)
Can be non-fiction (occurred in real-life)
Found in the forms of short stories, novels, news articles, biographies, memoirs.
A successful narrative should have...
Descriptive details
A clear beginning, middle, and end
Transitions and clues to help the reader understand the order of events
A consistent point-of-view and tone
Identify the main events:

What are the most important parts of the story?
Is each event part of the chain of events needed to tell the story?

Step 1
Dialogue



Conversation between two or more people. Dialogue is an effective way of developing characters in a narrative. As you write dialogue, choose words that express your characters' personalities and show how the characters feel about one another and about the events in the plot.
Organization:
Chronological Order:

writing is to arrange the events in chronological order.
One way to organize a piece of narrative
Introduction: Introduce your characters and setting.
Event 1
Event 2
Ending: Show the significance of the events.
NOTE: There can be more than two events.
Dialogue model:
"Can I help you?" a voice from behind him asked. Roger turned to see the salesperson looking down at him.
"I was just looking at this bike, "Roger said, swallowing.
"That's a pretty expensive bike you're touching," the sales person replied skeptically.

**Each time a new character speaks you must indent and start a new line.
Introduce the main character
Describe the conflict the character faces.
Relate the events and the changes the character goes through as a result of the conflict.
Present the final change or new understanding the character comes to in the end.


External (man vs. man, man vs. nature, man vs. society)
Internal (man vs. self)

An external conflict is where a character may have to overcome an outside force. For example, Katniss Everdeen, in The Hunger Games, must fight opponents in the arena to survive.

An internal conflict is where a character struggles with their own emotions. For example, after Katniss wins the Hunger Games she suffers from nightmares, post-traumatic stress disorder, and is often very afraid and paranoid even though she is no longer in the arena.
Third Option for Organization:
Focus on Conflict
When the telling of a fictional narrative
focuses on a central conflict, the story's plot may follow the model shown below.
Describe the main characters and setting
Present the conflict
Relate the events that make the conflict complex and cause the characters to change
Present the resolution or outcome of the conflict
Quick review on point-of-view and tone
Point of view:
First person: The narrator is a character in the story and uses first-person pronouns such as "I", "me", "we", and "us".
Third person: The narrator is NOT a character in the story; he or she uses third-person pronouns such as "he", "she", "they", and "them".
Third person omniscient: (All knowing) This narrator can see the thoughts and feelings of all the characters.
Third person limited: The narrator tells us what one or two (not all) characters think and feel.


Tone: The tone of a story is the writer's attitude toward his or her subject. Words such as "amused", "objective", and "angry" can be used to describe different tones.
End product:
This is what your MEMOIR will look like...
Start with the end in mind...
At the end of this unit, you will be writing a memoir. An important part of a memoir is the implied message about the importance of the particular memory. In other words, your memoir should answer the question, “What difference does it make?” The “snapshot” memory you choose must be important enough to share with our Giver, if we had one. This is a memory that you would want or need to pass down to future generations.


Who will be the narrator of your story?
Is that 1st person or 3rd person?

Possible topics:
• Name stories (How you got your name or why it is significant)
• Stories about growing up
• First day of school stories
• Love (First love, true love, heartache)
• Weather (Tornadoes, Hurricanes, etc. that you have experienced)
• Physical pain stories (Broken bones, stitches, surgeries, etc.)
• Funny family stories
• VIP stories (Events/moments that show the influence someone has had on you)

Possible topics:
• Name stories (How you got your name or why it is significant)
• Stories about growing up
• First day of school stories
• Love (First love, true love, heartache)
• Weather (Tornadoes, Hurricanes, etc. that you have experienced)
• Physical pain stories (Broken bones, stitches, surgeries, etc.)
• Funny family stories
• VIP stories (Events/moments that show the influence someone has had on you)
Plot
usually refers to the sequence of events and happenings that make up a story.
Literary Terms continued...
Theme: central idea or message about life that the author conveys.
Setting: when and where the story takes place.
Diction: the way the author uses language to advance the plot/story or develop characters.
Protagonist: usually the main character; engages the reader’s interest and sympathy. (Not always, but generally thought of as the “Good Guy.”)
Antagonist: often opposes the Protagonist; usually the “Bad Guy.”
Types of conflict:
Full transcript