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Germany Culture

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Tatiana Carcamo

on 31 October 2012

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Transcript of Germany Culture

GERMANY CULTURE Body Language Germans may appear reserved and unfriendly until you get to know them better. Germans respect perfectionism in all areas of business and private life. TIPS ABOUT IT... Never put your hands in your pockets when talking with someone. Don't point your index finger to your own head. This is an insult. Culture-Specific Gestures The "okay" sign is considered a rude gesture "Thumbs up" gesture means "one" or is a sign of appreciation or agreement. Romantic gestures in Germany are different and interesting too. There are different meanings for those gestures too and should be exhibited in apt time. Smiles Most smiles are happy signs.However, there are smiles that can also be an involuntary expression of anxiety, otherwise known as the grimace, or an expression of embarrassment in a sheepish sort of way Smiles are used with discretion, typically being reserved for close friends and family only Germans do not normally smile to express politeness as is common in the United States. •It is polite to look others in the eye during conversation, however one should not stare.
•Direct eye contact is considered a sign of respect, paying attention, and a sign of self-confidence interest during conversation.
•Looking away from a person when addressing them will be frowned upon and could negatively affect relations Eye Contact body motion
in concert •Smiles are used with discretion, typically being reserved for close friends and family only.

•Germans generally do not touch when speaking

•A firm but fairly brief handshake is the norm.

•Germans often signal their approval or thanks by gently rapping their knuckles on the tabletop instead of clapping. •The common gesture in use which can be misunderstood in Germany is the “OK” sign as it is considered unruly gesture

•Never shake hands with one hand in the pocket as it is a rude gesture

•Don’t speak by chewing a gum

•Never put your hands in your pockets when talking with someone.

•Try to control your effusiveness when demonstrating your affection towards others violations of expectations Touching Germany Firm handshake, for men traditionally accompanied by a slight bow Handshake across German bow Diener German culture uses handskake more frequently than any other culture. Handshake is used as a signal that the persons involved are starting off on status level that manifest each other's personhood. The degree of touching can vary during social interation. Can be construed as a sexual advance or sign of superiority, as a sing of bonding. Bumping Hand-clapping Slapping Hug In many cultures Touching between adults can indicate sexuality.
The woman who touches a man, and/or gazes into his eyes, is very likely to be interpreted as having sexual interests. They maintain the "handshake distance" for talking PROXEMICS own space as an extension of the ego Sign of autorithy and
dominance Related with "touching" silence interprets weakness, uncertainty and negativity towards an action. Amount of Talking When having a lunch with business partners, have a social conversation UNLESS the host start a business conversation through Kinesics Regulating Conversation Germans start to count with the thumb Handshake at the beginning and the end Making hands into two fists, thumbs tucked inside the other fingers and making pounding motion lightly on a surface expresses "good luck."
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