Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

Christians or Cult?

No description
by

Celine M

on 2 April 2013

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Christians or Cult?

My Journey towards understanding more about Jehovah's Witnesses Christians or Cult? Table of Contents Reflection Personal Statement
Confronting my stereotypes
Jehovah's Witnesses in the Media
Anti-Jehovah's Witness sites
Critique of the stereotypes
My experiences
Revisiting my stereotypes
Reflection
References Critique of the Media References Personal Statement Who is a Jehovah's Witness? 2. Why do these stereotypes exist?
Jehovah's Witnesses in the Media Television: Grey's Anatomy My process for challenging stereotypes FACTS:
My experience Post-education:
Revisiting and correcting Stereotypes Experience 1: Attending a Jehovah's Witness Congregation Experience 2: Attending Jehovah's Witnesses' Memorial of Jesus 1. Confronting my stereotypes Anti-JW screenshots 1. Confront my existing stereotypes
2. Why do these stereotypes exist?
3. Educate myself
4. Have my stereotypes changed? They are irrational, ignorant, stubborn individuals who cannot respect that everyone has their choice to whatever religion they choose to practice, even if it may not be theirs. They are very selfish people who believe that they are the only "real" Christians, and that only they will be saved on Judgement Day. They are disregardful of human life; using religion as a basis to prevent life-saving measures from being performed on their families, such as blood transfusions. They are a cult- consisting of very annoying people constantly badgering others to find out if they have "found Jesus," and often waste people's valuable time. Literature Documentary I was in elementary school when I discovered there was a group of Christians unlike any other- Jehovah's Witnesses. I was listening to my sister tell my mother a story about her friend's family. Her friend's aunt is a Jehovah's Witness, and my sister was discussing with my mother the troubles this has caused her family. Her aunt would not let her daughter receive a blood transfusion in the hospital and there was little hope she would recover. I was deeply disturbed by this story and could not bring myself to understand why someone would ever refuse to help their daughter. Any religion that caused family members to turn their backs on each other in their time of need did not seem like a religion I could identify with.

From then on, any time I heard of the Jehovah's Witnesses (JW's) in the news, on television, or in the paper, I would assume the worst, and agreed with any and all of the horrible claims against them and their so-called religion. Being from a Catholic family, everyone around me fervently agreed that these were people not to be dealt with. They were crazy, irrational, and selfish human beings. Over time, I learned that what I felt most towards JW's was fear. I could not rationalize any of their actions and really did not know enough about their religion to comprehend them. All that I knew was that they were the persistent individuals knocking at our door, asking if we have "found" Jesus. Being a devoted Catholic for moat of my life by default, I was simply appalled at these people who would have the guts to question MY Jesus.

As the years went on and I began learning about different types of religion, my tolerance of JW's began to improve, but I was still wary of the idea that they did not let others' be to practice their own beliefs, as I had learned to do for them. I also noticed more about the JW's as I kept up with the news, and my decline in faith for Catholicism and my increase in interest for social justice issues and human rights solidified my ideas of JW's as just another faith that uses their religion to put their people in danger while simultaneously putting down other religions that do not share their beliefs.

I found this project to be a great opportunity to visit the existing stereotypes I held for JW's, and really challenge myself to understand more about them. My hope for this project was that it would be an opportunity to push myself outside of my comfort zone, and open my eyes to a way of living that is different from mine. i ii Footnotes
Images

i-(n.d). [Photograph of man knocking]. [Online image]. Retrieved from: www.fanpop.com
ii-(n.d). [Photograph of Jehovah's Witness bracelet]. [Online image]. Retrieved from: www.pikdit.com ii iii iv i Footnotes Images
i- (n.d). Tiny Fey and Jehovah's Witnesses. [Online image]. Retrieved from: applescruffmimi.tumblr.com
ii-(n.d). Jehovah's Witness cartoon. [Online image]. Retrieved from: http://www.cartoonstock.com/directory/j/jehovah_s_witnesses.asp
iii- (n.d). Jehovah's Witness cartoon. [Online image]. Retrieved from: http://www.cartoonstock.com/directory/j/jehovah_s_witnesses.asp
iv-(n.d). Jehovah's Witness cartoon. [Online image]. Retrieved from: http://www.cartoonstock.com/directory/j/jehovah_s_witnesses.asp
v- (n.d). Jehovah's Witness cartoon. [Online image]. Retrieved from: www.freerepublic.com
Video
Televisionpromos. (2013, January 29). Grey's Anatomy 9x13 Sneak Peek "Bad Blood" (HD) [Video file]. Retrieved from: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pTDVFQx9oaUGreys
Articles
1- Jehovah's Witness loses fight to refuse transfusion. (2007, February 6). Canadian Press. Retrieved from: http://www.ctvnews.ca/jehovah-s-witness-loses-fight-to-refuse-transfusion-1.227940Ex-
2- Jehovah's Witness urges compulsory treatment. (2007, June 2). Canadian Press. Retrieved from: http://www.ctvnews.ca/ex-jehovah-s-witness-urges-compulsory-treatment-1.243578
3- Mulholland, Angela. Jehovah’s Witness heart patients do well, even without transfusions. (2012, July 12). CTVnews.ca. Retrieved from: http://www.ctvnews.ca/health/jehovah-s-witness-heart-patients-do-well-even-without-transfusions-1.863763#ixzz2PEyO8eFB vi Footnotes Images i-(n.d). [Knocking documentary]. [Online image]. Retrieved from: www.knocking.orgi
ii-(n.d). [Knocking documentary]. [Online image]. Retrieved from: www.knocking.orgi
iii- (n.d). One man died for all. Retrieved from: www.ylembo.wordpress.com
iv- (n.d). The greatest man who ever lived. [Online image]. Retrieved from: www.jwpedia.org
v- (n.d). New world translation. [Online image]. Retrieved from: www.biblicalworldviewacademy.org
vi- (n.d). Apocalypse delayed. [Online image]. Retrieved from: www.jesusisyhwh.blogspot.com
vii- (n.d). What does the Bible teach? [Online image]. Retrieved from: http://www.amazon.ca/Apocalypse-Delayed-Story-Jehovahs-Witnesses/dp/0802079733
viii- (n.d). [Online image]. Retrieved from: www.tower.com
viii-(n.d). [Knocking documentary]. [Online image]. Retrieved from: www.knocking.orgi iv v vii vi vi iii v Images Jehovah's Witnesses in the News A unique opportunity I was also very fortunate to be welcomed by the congregation to attend the only "ritualistic" ceremony they have per year- the memorial of Jesus' death.

This was a very interesting gathering, which lasted 45 minutes. Again, I felt extremely comfortable and welcomed by all of the members. I was even given my own Bible to keep up with everyone.

It was lovely talking to some JW members after the congregation, and I gained some key information about JW's. For example, I learned more about the JW perspective on death and what happens after we die. According to JW's, when we die it is like what happens when a candle is blown out- we simply cease to exist. Humans do not go straight to heaven like other Christians believe. Instead, there will be an Armageddon where Jehovah will punish all the world for going against his wishes. The entire world will be obliterated, and will be replaced by garden of Eden-like world free of sin, war, or sickness. This will be a perfect paradise, and many JW's and non-JW's will be resurrected to live on it. However, only 144,000 will be resurrected to heaven to serve as a government with Jehovah.

The congregation was also very useful in answering the questions who was Jesus? How does his death help us? And why is it important to remember him? There was a clear purpose laid out for this congregation, and it was practical in helping everyone get to know Jesus a bit better.

However, I did feel a bit uncomfortable at times during the congregation because of the constant reference to "he" as opposed to "she." No female ministers are allowed and JW's are known as a "brotherhood." The lack of a female role in this religion made me feel quite out of place as a woman, despite the welcoming gestures of the people.

This knowledge gained wonderfully supplemented the knowledge I obtained from reading some of the literature about JW's, shown in the next slide. What did I learn? JW religion Jehovah's Witnesses JW's have an hour-long congregation once a week (Sunday) followed by an hour of discussion and reflection on an article from "The Watchtower." These take place in the Kingdom Halls- not a church, not a room filled with symbols, but a simple building with chairs and a speaker's platform.
From witnessing these, it is clear that the JW religion is very instructional and practical as opposed to ritualistic. There is a constant focus on how to live your everyday lives to the fullest and the way Jehovah intended you to.
They place much importance on studying the Bible (3+ times a week), attending congregations, and doing their monthly community service (knocking door to door).
I also learned that JW's believe non-JW's know know little about what they believe and why.
I was informed that their religion is universal across the world. I spoke to a couple who, on their trip to Spain, encountered a Kingdom Hall congregation and were able to participate as if they were right at home. All congregations use the same Watchtower articles for discussion, use the same Bible and practice the same traditions. I learned JW's are a tight-knit family- everyone knows everyone in the congregation (~100 people) by name, and they report enjoying spending time together.
Everyone was very kind and welcoming, and made a point to introduce themselves to me at the end of the congregation.
I was informed that it is a very selfless religion- all the community work (knocking door to door and providing Bible study services) is volunteer work. Each month every member hands in their community work sheet; but it is not the quantity of the work done, but the effort that is noted by the JW community.
I also found out that all JW money is donated from the JW's themselves worldwide. For example, the JW's in the City of London donated their money as well as their time when more than 2,000 volunteer JW's built the Kingdom Hall on Second Street in 9 days.
It was also nice to learn that JW's participate in relief efforts all around the globe- such as helping flood victims in Australia For this project, I felt it was important to supplement any information I gathered about JW's with accounts from individuals who currently practice the religion in London, Ontario. I felt this would provide a rich, and more realistic description of JW's.

I was also aware of the immense amount of negative portrayals of JW's in the media and among the majority of people I have spoken to, so I felt the need to retrieve information "straight from the source", so that I could paint a genuine picture of the JW religion, and determine for myself if my stereotypes about JW's had changed after the process.

To do this, I called a JW Kingdom Hall in London, and they graciously invited me to come in right away, as there was a congregation going on. I was a bit nervous when first walking in, but was very pleased to see that they had asked a woman to sit with me during the congregation so that I did not have to sit alone. This woman also proved to be very patient as well as kind in keeping me up to speed with all portions of the congregation.

I found this experience to be a very educating one, and thought that the speech the Minister gave about "what makes a good Minister" was very intriguing. I learned a lot about JW's beliefs from this congregation, but also about JW's themselves, through my interactions with them. Jehovah's Witnesses are not a cult. Jehovah's Witnesses have a 130-year history, are in 230 lands and have seven million members.

The dictionary definition of sect is "a small group that has broken away from an established Church." JW's are not small, nor have they broken away from another religion.

"Sect" is often used as code to negatively imply the Witnesses are a cult. But JW's do not fit the definition of a cult, either. JW's refuse blood transfusions. Witnesses believe that blood is sacred and should only be used as God designates, based on an interpretation of Biblical texts:

In the Law that Jehovah gave the Israelites, he commanded: "You must not eat the blood of any sort of flesh."

JW's state: "We do not want to die. But if we tried to save our present life by breaking God's law, we would be in danger of losing everlasting life." Jehovah's Witnesses refuse to celebrate birthdays and Christmas. Witnesses refrain from religious holiday celebrations, including Christmas and Easter. This is because of the non-biblical origin of traditions and rituals associated with them.

Birthdays also go uncelebrated, as the celebration of anyone's birth is considered to be a pagan custom. Jehovah's Witnesses are politically neutral; respecting others' opinions. As subjects of God's government, JW's give God's laws priority. For this reason, they are apolitical and do not express any opinions on political issues or pledge allegiance to any governments.

Witnesses do not vote or run for political office because they believe only Jehovah can fix the world's problems, not any government. Jehovah's Witnesses do not believe in heaven, and do not act selfishly. Witnesses believe that God will reward the righteous with eternal life on Earth as perfect humans, but only Jehovah will decide who is worthy (it is not a competition).

Witnesses do believe that heaven exists as the invisible dwelling place of God, Jesus, the angels and a chosen group of 144,000 anointed humans:

The apostle John says: "I saw, and, look! the Lamb Jesus Christ standing upon the Mount Zion, and with him a hundred and forty-four thousand having his name and the name of his Father written on their foreheads." Jehovah's Witnesses shun members who leave the faith. It is true that Jehovah's Witnesses shun (or "disfellowship") as many as 30,000 members each year who refuse to live by the religion's moral tenets.

Witnesses say they shun with the intent to motivate ex-members to restore their relationship with God and to preserve the moral environment of the congregation.

Witnesses communicate with shunned family members who live in the same home, but their spiritual ties are severed.

Shunned members are invited to attend meetings but are not to interact with congregation members- they are only welcomed back upon "repentance."

Many shunned members eventually return to the faith. IMAGES TELEVISION NEWS Footnotes
"Knocking" provides a rich portrayal of JW's. The documentary outlines their struggles as well as their important contribution to civil liberties in all over the world. This film aims to allow the public to identify with JW's as people; gaining perspective into their sometimes controversial actions, learning more about their history, and impact.
Charles Taze Russell (1852-1916), in July 1879 launched Zion's Watch Tower and Herald of Christ's Presence- known today as the Watchtower magazine, and circulation quickly grew. In 1910 Russell established the International Bible Students Association (IBSA) in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. (The IBSA would later become known as Jehovah's Witnesses.) Last year, nearly 7 million members in 236 countries and territories spent more than 1.3 billion hours in their public ministry.
Jehovah's Witnesses have gone before the U.S. Supreme Court more than any other group- 62 times. The Witnesses brought a range of issues before the high Court, including mandatory flag salute, sedition, free speech, literature distribution and draft law. These cases proved to be pivotal moments in the formation of constitutional law. Their 50 wins aid all people, representing individual as well as religious freedoms.
German Jehovah's Witnesses went door-to-door speaking out against Hitler, and for their noncompliance to the Nazi State, were sent to the concentration camps. However, they had a choice to leave as long as they signed a document that renounced their religion and pledged allegiance to Hitler- few took the offer. Witness inmates also smuggled information about the camp structure and conditions out of the camps, and by the mid-1930s the group used its international network of members to publicly report Hitler's abuses- helping many people.
JW's do not accept blood transfusions based on an interpretation of the Bible that blood is sacred. This has created an adversarial relationship with doctors. Many physicians forced blood upon Witnesses with court-ordered transfusions. This raised the question of how much control a patient has over her/his body. Today doctors see JW's as an opportunity to practice using non-blood, safer alternatives. Now bloodless surgery is commonly available to all patients. However, there are still many ethical debates regarding the benefits of transfusions, and JW's resistance to them. Negative stories Positive stories Jehovah’s Witness heart patients do well, even without transfusions
July 2012 Jehovah's Witness loses fight to refuse transfusion- June 2009 loses WINNIPEG - "A Jehovah's Witness teenager with Crohn's disease has lost her court fight to refuse blood transfusions."


A 15-year-old girl was given a transfusion without her consent, as doctors stated it was medically necessary. A court order was obtained by Child and Family Services for the transfusion; leaving the young girl scared and overwhelmed. Despite acknowledging the teen's rights to religious freedom as a JW, the Manitoba Court of Appeal ruled a lower-court judge was correct in supporting the doctors' decision, as it was justified due to her status as a minor. Ex-Jehovah's Witness urges compulsory treatment
June 2007 viii MONTREAL - "Ex-Jehovah's Witness urges compulsory treatment." Jonathan Lavoie, former Jehovah's Witness, is outraged by his brother's unnecessary death due to an intestinal tumour which may have been cured if he agreed to a blood transfusion. In response, he has collected 5,000 names on a petition calling for doctors to be able to intervene medically despite an individual's religious beliefs; with adults being subjected to the same rigorous judicial test that children go through when questioning medical practices based on religion. Lavoie maintained: "I don't find it normal that in 2007, people still die in the name of their religion." OHIO- "A team from the Cleveland Clinic in Ohio conducted a study of JW's long-term survival post-heart surgery compared with non-Witnesses who had blood transfusions during heart surgery between 1983 to 2011. The researchers found the Jehovah’s Witnesses had the same risk of dying while in hospital as non-Witnesses."

Instead of blood, JW’s take supplements to boost their blood production ahead of surgery and encourage the use of “blood conservation practices.” The Witnesses, surprisingly, fared much better after surgery than their non-Witness counterparts- they had lower chances of needing further operations, had a lower risk of kidney failure and sepsis, and shorter hospital lengths of stay and higher survival rates one year after the surgery than with non-Witnesses. However, it is important to note that JW’s who undergo heart surgery without transfusions are healthier that typical heart patients- a Witness with complicated heart needs likely would not be operated on. Nevertheless, the study authors say that Jehovah's Witnesses provide a unique “natural experiment” to test blood conservation techniques and raises questions about the benefits of minimizing blood practices. "I Escaped Jehovah's Witness Cult But Healed Slowly After" "Cult Watch" "JWB: Jehovah's Witness Blog- denouncing Jehovah's Kingdom" "Cult Survivor Reveals Information About the Cult of Jehovah’s Witness" “It was pretty simple, really. I was mopping the floors one day when a thought suddenly occurred to me: ‘The Jehovah’s Witness cult was started by a human. He was no different from any other human who starts a cult or religion for their own purposes and gathers followers like trophies.” "QUESTIONS TO ASK JEHOVAH’S WITNESSES WHEN THEY KNOCK ON YOUR DOOR –-A Step-by-Step Guide for Christians Witnessing to Jehovah’s Witnesses" i ii iii iv v Footnotes i- Experience Project. (2013). I escaped Jehovah’s Witness cult but healed slowly after.
Retrieved from: http://www.experienceproject.com/groups/Escaped-Jehovahs-Witness-Cult-But-Healed-Slowly-After/214601
ii-CultWatch. (n.d). Jehovah’s Witnesses. Retrieved from:
http://www.cultwatch.com/jw.htm
iii- Jehovah’s Witness blog: Denouncing Jehovah’s kingdom. (n.d). The Jehovah’s Witness
cult. Retrieved from: http://www.jehovahswitnessblog.com/cult/jehovahs-witness-cult/
iv- Lipstick mystic. (2013). Cult survivor reveals Information about the cult of Jehovah’s
Witness. Retrieved from: http://www.lipstickmystic.com/jehovahs-witness-cult/
v- Witnesses for Jesus inc. (2011). Questions to as Jehovah’s Witnesses when they knock
on your door. Retrieved from: http://4witness.org/jehovahs_witness/jw-witness-door.php The majority of images found online put an emphasis on being “saved.”
They depict JW’s as annoying, devious, and pushy when knocking at people's doors.
There are also many pictures of JW’s represented as a cult-like army- breaking into people’s houses and doing “whatever it takes” to convert people.
These images relay the message that we are "against" JW's, and that they are extremist, annoying, and are our enemies. The issue of JW's refusing to accept blood transfusions is a popular theme on medical shows. This adds drama to the show- do the parents care more about their religion or their children?
In most shows I have seen, such as the episode of Grey's Anatomy given as an example, the parents choose their religion, but do not fully explain why this is the case. The shows often spin this decision in such a way that the parents are looked at as negligent, cult-like, and against doctors. There are many more negative stories about JW’s in the news than positive ones. These stories further invoke the public’s fear and misunderstanding of JW’s.
Many stories refer to the issue of blood transfusions for minors; and there have been many cases where children have been taken away from their families because of their refusal to give them transfusions.
The stories raise the issue of religion over human rights- these articles often do not provide the reason why JW's abstain from blood transfusions, leading people to develop further misunderstandings of JW's and their practices.
There is also a new "positive" portrayal of JW's as guinea pigs for doctors to test "blood-free" practices as discussed in the last article. Although this is a more positive portrayal of JW's in society, it still seems derogatory to me.
Reflection: Answering the question: "Why do these stereotypes exist?" By completing this project, I was given the opportunity to learn more about a group that I knew very little about, yet had many stereotypes for. I was able to recognize these stereotypes, educate myself about Jehovah's Witnesses, and challenge myself to change my existing stereotypes.

I was able to recognize that JW's are people just like us. They work in the tax and police fields, like the JW couple I met in London, as well as many other areas. They are our neighbours, co-workers, and friends living all around the world. However, like myself, many people are unaware of their practices and beliefs; allowing controversies and misunderstandings to perpetuate in the news and the media.

Despite learning more about their religion, there are still many JW beliefs that I do not fully understand or agree with. For example, their belief that only 144,000 people will be resurrected into their version of "heaven" seems very strange to me. Also, their aversion to blood transfusions is another practice that I do not agree with, being a believer in modern medicine. I cannot fathom a religion where the god would let their people die in her/his name. The practice of shunning a member who disobeys the practices or practices their individual freedoms is also something that I do not agree with. Also, there is no role of women in this religion. Members are referred to as "men" in congregations, and the lack of female ministers as well as the use of the term "brotherhood" to describe the JW religion makes me uncomfortable and out of place as a woman.

However, I now have a deeper appreciation for the JW religion. Through my experiences and research I have learned that following the JW religion is not easy; it takes dedication, perseverance, and complete faith. Having met the people I have, I have the feeling that they have the best intentions; following "the truth" and spreading the word for all to hear so that they, too, may be "saved." ARTICLES:
Ridley, D. (1999). Jehovah's Witnesses' refusal of blood: Obedience to scripture and religious conscience.Journal of
Medical Ethics, 25(6), 469-472.

Wilson, D. (2003). The awakening of a Jehovah's Witness: One woman’s struggle to escape. Free Inquiry,23(4), 30-33. ARTICLES:

"The Awakening of a Jehovah's Witness: One Woman's Struggle to Escape"

"Jehovah's Witnesses' Refusal of Blood: Obedience to Scripture and Religious Conscience" What did I learn? Being a JW (especially a woman as a JW) can be particularly difficult; especially when regarding the issue of "shunning" disobeying members of the congregation.

When a person is disfellowshipped in the JW religion, they have been spiritually cut off from the congregation. If a family member is disfellowshipped, despite the family ties that remain, the other members will cease to have spiritual ties with her/him.

Jehovah's Witnesses believe that the Bible is the divinely inspired word of God.

Jehovah's Witnesses believe that God sees everything we do, if others see it or not.

JW's believe Jehovah God deeply cares for them and hopes they follow his loving direction. If they are true to Jehovah, they will be happy and will avoid many problems in life. Jehovah is in truth God, and is the Creator of all living things.

JW's seek to benefit from what the Bible teaches for use in their everyday lives.

They are strongly opposed to abortion since they feel that human life begins at conception. However; they believe that birth control is a personal matter.

The JW's live highly moral lives, due to the strictness with which Jehovah's Witnesses are governed.

The preaching work of JW's is seen as central to their lives. They are under divine command, preaching the Kingdom good news in all the earth and making disciples of people of all the nations. BOOKS:
Bowman, R. M. (1995). Jehovah's witnesses. Grand Rapids, Mich.: Zondervan.

Penton, M. J. (1997). Apocalypse delayed :The story of jehovah's witnesses (2nd ed.). Toronto: University of Toronto
Press.

Watch Tower Bible and Tract Society of Pennsylvania. (2005). What does the Bible really teach? New York:
Watchtower Bible and Tract Society of New York, Inc.

Watch Tower Bible and Tract Society of Pennsylvania. (1991). The greatest man who ever lived. New York:
Watchtower Bible and Tract Society of New York, Inc. What did I learn? HISTORY JW's vs. HITLER: SUPREME COURT APPEARANCES: MEDICAL MOVEMENT: Documentary
As discussed in class on January 15th, it is human nature to form our own stereotypes and perceptions of people.

These stereotypes, as discussed in the film "Them and Us" viewed on January 15th, helps us make sense of the world around us. Our brain, which insists on making categories, groups people depending on our culture and upbringing.

We also tend to filter out information that doesn't fit based on our pre-existing stereotypes. This "selective ignorance" can easily slip into prejudice which can turn into discrimination; leading us to dehumanize our enemies.

As discussed in the same class, the media often portrays Christian norms (not JW Christians). As a result, Christians are seen as the "norm" while JW's are seen as extremists and cult-like. As opposed to having the privilege to be judged individually like Christians, they, as a minority, have to represent the entire religion, at times.

It is always important that we keep our stereotypes in check, and recognize our prejudices. Throughout this project, I took every opportunity to learn more about JW's, and challenge my stereotypes, as is depicted in the next slide. There is only one true religious organization, and believers must submit to this one true organization.
This is supported by the Bible:
There is only "one faith"- Ephesians 2:5
Believers need "the faithful and discreet slave" to dispense God's truth- Matthew 24:45-47
There is no trinity- according to JW's, the Bible says nothing about a trinity, which other Christians believe in.
JW's are indoctrinated- they attend several meetings every week at which they are taught uniformly the same things all over the world.
Witnesses are taught to value unity and organizational loyalty. I have also learned that they are a religion that, while fighting for their religious freedom, have promoted freedom rights for all people. JW's are a very diverse group of people that I now know a bit more about. However, I now understand how important it is to keep in mind that they are all individual people; and that all JW's are not the same, but all deserve respect. I am confident that the next time a Jehovah's Witness knocks at my door, I will gladly answer it. i Images
i-(n.d). Jehovah Witness. [Online image]. Retrieved from: www.knock.org
Documentary
1-4, 7, 9-12, 14-18-Knocking: Jehovah's Witnesses Myths and Realities. (n.d). Retrieved from:
http://www.knocking.org/Jehovahs_Witnesses_Facts_Myths_Realities.html
Books
5- Watch Tower Bible and Tract Society of Pennsylvania. (2005). What does the Bible really teach? New York: Watchtower
Bible and Tract Society of New York, Inc, p. 129.
6- Watch Tower Bible and Tract Society of Pennsylvania. (2005). What does the Bible really teach? New York: Watchtower
Bible and Tract Society of New York, Inc, p. 131.
8-Watch Tower Bible and Tract Society of Pennsylvania. (2005). What does the Bible really teach? New York: Watchtower
Bible and Tract Society of New York, Inc, p. 156-157.
13-Watch Tower Bible and Tract Society of Pennsylvania. (2005). What does the Bible really teach? New York: Watchtower
Bible and Tract Society of New York, Inc, p. 74. i ii Books 1 3 4 5 6 7 9 11 12 13 14 1-Wilson, D. (2003). The awakening of a Jehovah's Witness: One woman’s struggle to escape. Free Inquiry,23(4), 30-33.
2-Ridley, D. (1999). Jehovah's Witnesses' refusal of blood: Obedience to scripture and religious conscience.Journal of Medical Ethics, 25(6), p. 3.
3-Ridley, D. (1999). Jehovah's Witnesses' refusal of blood: Obedience to scripture and religious conscience.Journal of Medical Ethics, 25(6), p. 2.
4-Ridley, D. (1999). Jehovah's Witnesses' refusal of blood: Obedience to scripture and religious conscience.Journal of Medical Ethics, 25(6), p. 3.
5-
Watch Tower Bible and Tract Society of Pennsylvania. (2005). What does the Bible really teach? New York: Watchtower Bible and Tract Society of New York, Inc, p. 144.
6-Watch Tower Bible and Tract Society of Pennsylvania. (2005). What does the Bible really teach? New York: Watchtower Bible and Tract Society of New York, Inc, p. 123.
7-Watch Tower Bible and Tract Society of Pennsylvania. (2005). What does the Bible really teach? New York: Watchtower Bible and Tract Society of New York, Inc, p. 7.
8-Penton, M. J. (1997). Apocalypse delayed :The story of jehovah's witnesses (2nd ed.). Toronto: University of Toronto Press, p. 202.
9-Penton, M. J. (1997). Apocalypse delayed :The story of jehovah's witnesses (2nd ed.). Toronto: University of Toronto Press, p. 283.
10-Penton, M. J. (1997). Apocalypse delayed :The story of jehovah's witnesses (2nd ed.). Toronto: University of Toronto Press, p. 206.
11-Bowman, R. M. (1995). Jehovah's witnesses. Grand Rapids, Mich.: Zondervan, p. 17.
12-Bowman, R. M. (1995). Jehovah's witnesses. Grand Rapids, Mich.: Zondervan, pp. 22-23.
13-Bowman, R. M. (1995). Jehovah's witnesses. Grand Rapids, Mich.: Zondervan, p. 71.
14-Bowman, R. M. (1995). Jehovah's witnesses. Grand Rapids, Mich.: Zondervan, p. 71. 8 10 WEBSITES:
CultWatch. (n.d). Jehovah’s Witnesses. Retrieved from: http://www.cultwatch.com/jw.htm
Experience Project. (2013). I escaped Jehovah’s Witness Cult but healed slowly after. Retrieved from:
http://www.experienceproject.com/groups/Escaped-Jehovahs-Witness-Cult-But-Healed-Slowly-After/214601
Knocking: Jehovah's Witnesses Myths and Realities. (n.d). Retrieved from:
http://www.knocking.org/Jehovahs_Witnesses_Facts_Myths_Realities.html
Jehovah’s Witness blog: Denouncing Jehovah’s Kingdom. (n.d). The Jehovah’s Witness cult. Retrieved from:
http://www.jehovahswitnessblog.com/cult/jehovahs-witness-cult/
Lipstick mystic. (2013). Cult survivor reveals Information about the cult of Jehovah’s Witness. Retrieved from: http://www.lipstickmystic.com/jehovahs-witness-cult/
Witnesses for Jesus inc. (2011). Questions to as Jehovah’s Witnesses when they knock on your door. Retrieved from:
http://4witness.org/jehovahs_witness/jw-witness-door.php
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 1 2 3 a, b, c, d-Engardio, J., Shepard, T. Knocking: A documentary film. (2006). Retrieved from:
http://www.knocking.org/Jehovahs_Witnesses_Facts_Myths_Realities.html a b c d DOCUMENTARY:
Engardio, J., Shepard, T. Knocking: A documentary film. (2006). Retrieved from:
http://www.knocking.org/Jehovahs_Witnesses_Facts_Myths_Realities.html VIDEOS:
Jehovah's Witnesses PBS documentary: www.Knocking.org [Video file]. Retrieved from:Knockingdocumentary. (2006, December 2). Jehovah's Witnesses PBS documentary: www.Knocking.org [Video file]. Retrieved from: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Oj4cS4n9ZkAknocking
Televisionpromos. (2013, January 29). Grey's Anatomy 9x13 Sneak Peek "Bad Blood" (HD) [Video file]. Retrieved from: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pTDVFQx9oaUGreys
Knockingdocumentary. (2006, December 2). Jehovah's Witnesses PBS documentary: www.Knocking.org [Video file]. Retrieved from: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Oj4cS4n9ZkAKnocking Video Images (n.d). Apocalypse delayed. [Online image]. Retrieved from: www.jesusisyhwh.blogspot.com
(n.d). Jehovah Witness. [Online image]. Retrieved from: www.knock.org
(n.d). Jehovah's Witness cartoon. [Online image]. Retrieved from: http://www.cartoonstock.com/directory/j/jehovah_s_witnesses.asp
(n.d). Jehovah's Witness cartoon. [Online image]. Retrieved from: http://www.cartoonstock.com/directory/j/jehovah_s_witnesses.asp
(n.d). Jehovah's Witness cartoon. [Online image]. Retrieved from: http://www.cartoonstock.com/directory/j/jehovah_s_witnesses.asp
(n.d). Jehovah's Witness cartoon. [Online image]. Retrieved from: www.freerepublic.com
(n.d). [Knock]. [Online image]. Retrieved from: www.knocking.orgi
(n.d). [Knocking]. [Online image]. Retrieved from: www.knocking.orgi
(n.d). [Knocking documentary]. [Online image]. Retrieved from: www.knocking.orgi
(n.d). New world translation. [Online image]. Retrieved from: www.biblicalworldviewacademy.org
(n.d). One man died for all. [Online image]. Retrieved from: www.ylembo.wordpress.com
(n.d). [Online image]. Retrieved from: www.tower.com
(n.d). [Photograph of man knocking]. [Online image]. Retrieved from: www.fanpop.com
(n.d). [Photograph of Jehovah's Witness bracelet]. [Online image]. Retrieved from: www.pikdit.com
(n.d). The greatest man who ever lived. [Online image]. Retrieved from: www.jwpedia.org
(n.d). Tiny Fey and Jehovah's Witnesses. [Online image]. Retrieved from: www.applescruffmimi.tumblr.com
(n.d). What does the Bible teach? [Online image]. Retrieved from: http://www.amazon.ca/Apocalypse-Delayed-Story-Jehovahs-Witnesses/dp/0802079733 2 In addition to the literature that provided many facts about JW's and their religion that I did not know about, I found watching a documentary about JW's, entitled "Knocking," to be very beneficial in helping bring together the information found in the literature, as well as the information gained from my experiences. The documentary is discussed in the next few slides. This documentary was a great addition to my other research, as it provides more positive insights about the JW community. They are a people who, despite being apolitical, have made significant changes in the law regarding religious as well as personal freedoms. Fighting for the rights of all people, such as those persecuted in WWII, JW's continue to profoundly change our law, medicine, and other systems throughout the world. My next step towards understanding more about JW's was recognizing why these stereotypes exist. I found most of society's ideas about who JW's are and what they practice derive from the media- in pictures, on television, and in the news. These ideas influenced the stereotypes I held for JW's greatly. This slide discusses the various media influences that contributed to the stereotypes I held for JW's. There are also many sites online that strengthen people's negative stereotypes about JW's that I discovered during my research. A few examples are given in the next slide.
Full transcript