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Una Visión General del Abanico

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Julia Tanzler

on 17 May 2011

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Transcript of Una Visión General del Abanico

Una Visión General del Abanico
By: Julia Tanzler It’s hard to imagine that the unique history of the hand fan dates all the way back to the year 1429 and still continues today. However, here is some information about the hand fan in the present era – the 21st century:
Fans are used today mainly in Delhi, India, and the Capital, where they are understood to be a form of art and a climate induced requirement.
The primary reason why the fan is still around today is because it is seen as an “advertising gimmick.”
In Europe, the Spanish fan industry was able to survive the 21st century because of the heat and its location in a conservative, rural society.
In Spain, local fan making guilds are called Abaniqueros. Abaniqueros in the Valencia region of Spain carve, paint, and fasten fans, and are relied upon by manufacturers.
The fan is as an essential item for Spanish women everywhere and is used at numerous occasions.
Even Spanish men have been seen walking the streets of Spain showing off their fans – which are most definitely a more masculine version of them.
El pericon is the fan that is used to dance Flamenco and is the most dramatic prop for Flamenco dancing.
On the wedding day of Prince Felipe and Princess Letizia in 2004, souvenir fans were distributed to the public and numerous royal guests came along with their own fans, too.
Jesus Costa is a well-known Spanish painter who successfully collaborates with “A Cool Breeze” since 2001. He has many artistic skills and masters the composition of the fan format.
Another fan fanatic – John Brooker of East Rudham in Norfolk, UK – began making fans in 1984 and retired in April of 2006.
Both artists have had their work appear in “Shakespeare in Love,” “Ideal Husband,” “The Patriot,” and “Lorna Doone.” Background color: Natural wood, shades of red, pink, yellow, gray.
Size: Large
Length (when closed): 26 cm
Width (when unfolded): 49 cm
Height (when unfolded): 26 cm
Author: Unknown
Ribbing: High quality pear wood, nicely polished.
Leaf: Silk, lithography printed.
Time Period: Modern-day; 21st century
Decoration: A beautiful design suggesting a bunch of flowers, with black trimming on the leaf edge.
This fan snaps open and shut with a very smooth movement and nice sound.
It's found online at www.ideco.com, where this fan can be purchased for $83.00. There are many ways in which the hand fan is used to converse with others – particularly between a man and a woman. Here is a summary and some examples of how the fan developed into such a communication device:
During the late 1700’s to the early 1800’s, fans were seen as cooling and communication instruments. Love messages would be sent back and forth between two people – either telling one another they are interested or would like to go their separate ways. Although these techniques were extensively demonstrated in the past, they are now almost entirely forgotten. Back then, the hand fan would be used in England during dancing assemblies where the gentleman would choose his partner by picking a ladies’ fan from a hat, and whomever it belonged to was his companion for the evening. In those days, everyone was educated about the language of the fan because it was a sneaky way in which a gentleman or a lady could entice the one of their choice. The language of the fan is thought to have been invented by Maison Duvelleroy, and whether this “verbal creativeness” was used in Great Britain or Puerto Rico, in “La Danza” or the “Guajira” dances, it served as a way to transport passionate messages, while keeping an elegant and romantic tone.
Some simple messages conveyed by the fan are:
If the woman was to let the fan rest on the right cheek, it meant: “Yes.”
If the woman was to let the fan rest on the left cheek, it meant: “No.”
If the woman was to touch the handle to the lip, it meant: “I want to kiss you.”
If the woman was to draw the fan through her hand, it meant: “I hate you!” The Fan Circle International; 20th & 21st Century Fans:
http://www.fancircleinternational.org/
The Fan Museum: http://www.fan-museum.org
The Worshipful Company of Fan Makers; A Short History of Hand Held Fans: http://www.fanmakers.com/text.aspx?id=25 Abanicos
Muy elegantes
Abriendo, cerrando, agitando
Contento, Triste, Furioso, Celoso
Brisa This is a picture of myself and my fan. This is a close-up of my fan. I am opening my fan wide,
which means "Wait for me." I am resting the fan on my lips, which means "I don't trust you." I am resting the fan on my heart,
which means "My love for you
is breaking my heart." I am quickly fanning myself,
which means "I love you so much." Mi abanico se llama "Un abanico de estados de ánimo muchos."
Decoré mi abanico de esta manera porque yo quería mostrar mis estados de ánimo. Tengo muchos estados de ánimo, pero pongo los cinco más importantes que experimento todos los días. Estos estados de ánimo son la felicidad, la tristeza, el enojo, los celosos, y el amor. Los colores de mi abanico son rojo, amarillo, verde, rosa y azul con muchos destellos
y joyas. Para estado de ánimo que estoy sintiendo en este momento, voy señalar la sección correspondiente. Mi abanico es único, interesante, bonito, creativo y me representa muy bien. These two exquisite fans above were hand-painted by Jesus Costa. Spanish Cinquain Poem The Language of the Fan A Summary of the 21st Century Hand Fan A Fashionable Modern Fan A Description of My Fan Sites I Visited and Recommend Thanks for watching!
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