Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

6.03 Ethnicity & Nationality

No description
by

Renee Robinson

on 1 December 2013

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of 6.03 Ethnicity & Nationality

6.03 Ethnicity & Nationality
FONTS
Interviewee #2
R-Where were you born?
M- I was born in Monmouthshire, Wales.

R-How long have you lived in your current town? Where else have you lived?
M- I have lived in London, England for the past 19 years. Before that, I lived in Essex for 1 year. I lived in Newport, Wales for 2 years and I lived in my birth town of Monmountshire for 4 years.
R-What is your nationality?
M-My nationality is English.
R-How would you describe or identify your ethnicity? What are some events and/or traditions that you participate in that highlight your ethnic heritage?
M- My ethnicity is Welsh. A tradition of Wales is Calennig where we give gifts on New Years Day. On Christmas, we have Plygain where the entire family sing from 3-6a.m on Christmas day. The day before, on Christmas Eve or Noson Gyflaith, our family makes our own toffee or 'taffy.' Also , some years I visit Wales to go to a book museum because literature is a major part of our culture. Authors like Roald Dahl and Ken Follett hail from Wales.
R-Which cultural affiliation do you consider most important to you personally: ethnicity or nationality? Why do you consider it most important?
M-I believe that my nationality is more important because I feel that I have a stronger connection to this country being that I lived there for 20 years. Therefore, I feel that I have a better relationship to this land because I don't remember Wales that well.
R-How do you connect with your nationality?
M- I connect with my nationality more because I have a stronger English accent and I also practice English customs as well as enjoying their cuisine.
R-Do you have any family?
M- I am an only child, but my parents both live in Monmountshire, Wales.
R- Compare your life between your nationality and ethnicity?
M- I lived in a small, poor village in Monmountshire, Wales and now I live in an apartment in England. So, I favor my status in England a bit more.

Conclusion
Interviewee #3
R-Where were you born?
N-I was born in Sudan.
R-How long have you lived in your current town? Where else have you lived?
N- I have lived in Melbourne, Australia for 15 years. I spent 9 years in my birth country, Sudan.
R-What is your nationality?
N- My nationality is Australian.
R-How would you describe or identify your ethnicity? What are some events and/or traditions that you participate in that highlight your ethnic heritage?
N- My ethnicity is Sudanese, specifically south Sudan. I participate in dancing to traditional music to staying intact to my culture.
R-Which cultural affiliation do you consider most important to you personally: ethnicity or nationality? Why do you consider it most important?
N- I consider my ethnicity to be most important because it connects you with your own past and family line. Even though I have been living in Melbourne for a while and my husband is from here, my ethnicity is vital to me as an individual because of the grounding it gives me.
R- How do you connect with your nationality?

N- I visit landmarks and take vacations in Australia. Also, my husband is Australian so I can connect with my nationality in that perspective.
R- Do you have any family?

N- Apart from my husband, my older sister, Ducky, lives in Australia as well. However, my parents and my younger siblings still live in Sudan.
R- Compare your life between your nationality and ethnicity?

N- Sudan has my family but they are still reeling from the conflicts that occurred there. There is a lot more stability where I am now and I am thankful for that. Although, my ethnicity will always be special to me.
Interviewee #1
R- Where were you born?

K-I was born in Reykjavik, Iceland.
R-How long have you lived in your current town? Where else have you lived?
K-I have lived in Santa Monica, California in the U.S. for 12 years. I lived in Reykjavik until I was 5 years old.
R-What is your nationality?
K- My nationality is American.
R-How would you describe or identify your ethnicity? What are some events and/or traditions that you participate in that highlight your ethnic heritage?
K- My ethnicity is Icelandic. For me, my New Years Eve starts at 6:00 p.m. My family and I go to mass and then afterward we have a big fire in our neighborhood and enjoy fireworks. Also, around Christmas we enjoy the folklore that we have thirteen yule-lads (Santa clauses) that visit thirteen days before Christmas.
R-Which cultural affiliation do you consider most important to you personally: ethnicity or nationality? Why do you consider it most important?
K- I consider ethnicity more important to because it gives me a sense of belonging to my ancestors and my family. I identify myself as being Icelandic because it is important to me to understand where I came from.
R- How do you connect with your nationality?
K- I am a citizen of the United States and I am educated in the history of America.
R- Do you have any family?
K- Yes, I live in Santa Monica with my parents and my nine year old brother.
R-Compare your life between your nationality and ethnicity?
K- Well, I was young when I was living in Reykjavik so I don't remember very well.

Summary
Interviewee 1 is Kristine Ullebo
Interviewee 2 is Marina Diamandis
Inerviewee 3 is Nikki Morose
By:Renee Robinson

Ethnicity and nationality have an impact on someone’s identity. However, ethnicity makes a greater influence because it can connect you to your family and ancestors. It provides a sense of belonging to your roots. While nationality is important as well, it may be because someone has been there for a long time and may not connect with their family. This can be shown in Marina’s interview where she says that she connects with her nationality more than her ethnicity. This is most likely because Marina has been living in England for 20 years.

All in all, ethnicity makes the greatest impact on a person because of the personal cultural ties that it has. Kristine and Nikki are examples of people who feel altered by their ethnicity because they feel more connected to it rather than their nationality. Ethnicity can make someone feel allied to someone else of the same ethnicity because there is a shared communication and understanding.
Full transcript