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Assessment2

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Kelly Meris

on 11 February 2013

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Transcript of Assessment2

Assessment Writing Student Learning Outcomes Levels of Assessment Gathering Appropriate Data Using Rubrics Analyzing Data Closing the Loop Evaluation of Assessment Processes Assessment and
Accountability History Future Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business
Accrediting Council on Education in Journalism and Mass Communication,
Commission on Dental Accreditation of the American Dental Association
Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology
American Bar Association and Association of American Law Schools
Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education
National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Instruction
American Psychological Association
American Speech-Language-Hearing Association
National Accrediting Agency for Clinical Laboratory Sciences
Accreditation Review Commission on Education for the Physician Assistant
American Physical Therapy Association
American Society of Exercise Physiology
National Athletic Training Association Board of Credentialing Disciplinary Accrediting Bodies Disciplinary Accrediting Bodies
Regional Accrediting Bodies
The U.S. News and World Report Rankings
The National Research Council
Reauthorized Higher Education Act The Political Climate of Accountability University Mission
The University of North Carolina at Greensboro will redefine the public research university for the 21st century as an inclusive, collaborative, and responsive institution making a difference in the lives of students and the communities it serves
Departmental Mission
Discipline specific Start with Mission Definition: the systematic collection review and use of information about student learning in order to inform decisions about how to improve learning
(Palomba and Banta, 1999: Walvoord, 2004)

It is a type of “action research” used to inform local action.

It does not necessarily require standardized tests or “objective measures.” One can assess critical thinking, scientific reasoning, or other qualities by making informed professional judgments Assessment Concepts Courtesy of HLC Regional Accrediting Agencies EASC MSCHE SACSCOC WASC NWCCU HLC
-North Central- Universities have always engaged in informal assessment
1990 in Scholarship Reconsidered, encouraged quality teaching
In 1992 the federal government required accrediting agencies to include student learning outcomes as part of accreditation
In 2001 the Council for Higher Education, in Accreditation and Student Learning Outcomes: A Point of Departure argued for use of SLOs
In 2003 the Council for Higher Education Accreditation in its Statement of Mutual Responsibilities for Student Learning Outcomes urged use of SLOs
In 2005 in the publication of The Responsive Ph.D. emphasized as one of its four principles, conducting assessment with reasonable consequences
Each of the six regional accrediting bodies have standards calling for use of SLOs History of Assessment Assessment required by accreditation
Make assessment pay off
Need for benchmarks
Developing SLOs across universities to allow comparisons
Determination if standardized tests are needed
Preparing future faculty for assessment
CGS Teagle Foundation Project
CGS Publications What Lies Ahead? Assessment seen as a bureaucratic imposition vs. a method to improve learning and pedagogy
September 7th 2010 Chronicle Article entitled Assessment Projects from Hell by David Glenn
45 irate comments
November 12th 2010 Chronicle article entitled It’s Not How Much Student Data You Have, but How You Use It by Sara Lipka
“Ready, shoot, aim” The Controversy Document departmental goals for student learning
Articulate the student learning outcome statements (what the student will be able to do upon completion)
Gather evidence on performance Step Three At the completion of the degree in communication, the graduate will be able to:
1. Communicate effectively in both oral and written format during capstone experience.
2. Articulate the historical, theoretical and methodological foundations of the discipline of communication. 
3. Apply research-based, theory-informed knowledge of the field to solve real-life problems in a variety of work or community settings.
4. Apply ethical decision making skills in a variety of communication situations.
5. Integrate knowledge from theory, methods, and ethics from the discipline of communication to a particular specialization
6. Design and execute an original thesis research project. Step Two Examples Acquire advanced knowledge and a deeper understanding of the skills and knowledge in the discipline
Develop a sense of responsibility towards, as well as an understanding of the ethical dimensions of the discipline
Develop the competence, knowledge, and independence for the realization of leadership potential
Other goals specific to the discipline Step One Examples Document departmental goals for student learning Step One wrwiener@uncg.edu Proxy Evidence Direct Evidence Benchmarking with peer institutions
Career Placements
Employer Surveys
Advisory groups on curriculum development
Student Graduation/retention rates
Exit interviews
Student satisfaction surveys
Focus Groups
Alumni surveys
Alumni honors
Analysis of grade distributions
Peer review of courses and programs Evaluation of papers, projects, original work in courses but not course overall grade
Comprehensive examinations
Certification examinations
Licensure examinations
Locally developed pretest and/or posttest
Portfolios with evidence of learning
Audio or videotaping
Thesis/dissertations
Peer-reviewed publications
Disciplinary presentations
Funded grants and fellowships Gather Evidence Doctoral
Example Purdue University
Dissertation
Rubric
Form Finding: Students lack quantitative skills in understanding graphs, charts, and numerical concepts
Solution: Embedding Math Across the Curriculum Example of Usage at Marquette Example: Outcomes, Indicators, Measures
Usage: (Third Column) Modified from James Madison University 0=No Coverage; 1=Slight Coverage; 2=Moderate Coverage; 3=Major Coverage Departmental Assessment Purpose of reviews is to determine if program achieves it objectives
Assessment examines success of students in achieving learning objectives
The pairing of the two is a good strategy Embedding Assessment into
Academic Program Reviews It is recommended that every graduate program be reviewed every five to ten years.
Graduate program review is an independent process, distinct from any other review.
Integrating outcomes assessment with formal review process maximizes of the value of both and reflects best practice.
Most important, program review results in action.
This plan is linked to the institution’s budget and planning process in order to ensure that recommended changes are actually made.
One year after the action plan or memorandum of understanding is signed, or at some other agreed-upon date, the parties responsible for each action item should be asked to report on what has been accomplished. Assessment & Review of Graduate Programs: Quotes from new CGS Monograph Program Review and Assessment go Hand-in-Hand

Both can be linked to improve learning and program quality Program Review
- The purpose of program review is the improvement of graduate programs Assessment
- The purpose of assessment is to improve student learning Two Components of Evaluation Who will be responsible for administration of the assessment plan
What are the resources and structures for assessment
Who are the targeted students (population vs. sample)
When will the student assessments be conducted and repeated
How is assessment data to be used for improvement of learning
What are the recommended changes to improve the assessment mechanism Procedural Items to be Addressed Courtesy of James Madison University Improvement of Assessment Assessment at the Course Level Assessment at the General Education Level Assessment at the Discipline Level Assessment at the Graduate Level Assessment at the Institutional Level Definition: the systematic collection review and use of information about student learning in order to inform decisions about how to improve learning
(Palomba and Banta, 1999: Walvoord, 2004)

It is a type of “action research” used to inform local action.

It does not necessarily require standardized tests or “objective measures.” One can assess critical thinking, scientific reasoning, or other qualities by making informed professional judgments Assessment Concepts University Mission
The University of North Carolina at Greensboro will redefine the public research university for the 21st century as an inclusive, collaborative, and responsive institution making a difference in the lives of students and the communities it serves
Departmental Mission
Discipline specific Start with Mission Disciplinary Accrediting Bodies
Regional Accrediting Bodies
The U.S. News and World Report Rankings
The National Research Council
Reauthorized Higher Education Act The Political Climate of Accountability Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business
Accrediting Council on Education in Journalism and Mass Communication
Commission on Dental Accreditation of the American Dental Association
Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology
American Bar Association and Association of American Law Schools
Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education
National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Instruction
American Psychological Association
American Speech-Language-Hearing Association
National Accrediting Agency for Clinical Laboratory Sciences
Accreditation Review Commission on Education for the Physician Assistant
American Physical Therapy Association
American Society of Exercise Physiology
National Athletic Training Association Board of Credentialing Disciplinary Accrediting Bodies Courtesy of HLC Regional Accrediting Agencies MSCHE SACSCOC WASC NWCCU HLC
-North Central- NWCCU WASC HLC
-North
Central- SACSCOC MSCHE EASC Universities have always engaged in informal assessment
1990 in Scholarship Reconsidered, encouraged quality teaching
In 1992 the federal government required accrediting agencies to include student learning outcomes as part of accreditation
In 2001 the Council for Higher Education, in Accreditation and Student Learning Outcomes: A Point of Departure argued for use of SLOs
In 2003 the Council for Higher Education Accreditation in its Statement of Mutual Responsibilities for Student Learning Outcomes urged use of SLOs
In 2005 in the publication of The Responsive Ph.D. emphasized as one of its four principles, conducting assessment with reasonable consequences
Each of the six regional accrediting bodies have standards calling for use of SLOs History of Assessment Assessment seen as a bureaucratic imposition vs. a method to improve learning and pedagogy
September 7th 2010 Chronicle Article entitled Assessment Projects from Hell by David Glenn
45 irate comments
November 12th 2010 Chronicle article entitled It’s Not How Much Student Data You Have, but How You Use It by Sara Lipka
“Ready, shoot, aim” The Controversy Assessment required by accreditation
Make assessment pay off
Need for benchmarks
Developing SLOs across universities to allow comparisons
Determination if standardized tests are needed
Preparing future faculty for assessment
CGS Teagle Foundation Project
CGS Publications What Lies Ahead? Document departmental goals for student learning
Articulate the student learning outcome statements (what the student will be able to do upon completion)
The goals must be operationalized into learning outcome statements within the context of the discipline
The statements should describe the attitudes, behaviors, skills, and ways of thinking Step Two Created by Lee Bash, Higher Learning Commission Presentation Example: Communication Rubric Courses and syllabi should be developed in a backward fashion
Starting point should be the competencies expected of the students
Teaching activities, assignments, and testing should be geared to attainment of the competencies Course Level
Competencies Student Learning Outcomes: Digital Story Telling (DST 500)

1. Articulate the ethical, political, and cultural implications of digital storytelling as a form of representation.
Performance Indicators
• Explain the concept of representation and identify the ways that storytelling serves as a form of representation.
• Analyze the ethical, political, and cultural implications of who tells stories about whom.
Data: These performance indicators will be assessed through 2 required papers.

2. Use narrative theory to analyze the basic structure of storytelling in different forms such as public affairs journalism, fundraising, advertising, public relations, entertainment, etc.
Performance Indicators
• Identify basic elements of a narrative that cut across all narratives, regardless of form.
• Identify how those basic elements work within different forms such as public affairs journalism, fundraising, advertising, public relations, entertainment, etc.
Data: These performance indicators will be assessed through an analysis paper.

3. Develop the skills needed to determine which narrative structure and medium best tell a given story.
Performance Indicators
• Identify the characteristics of different media as well as their strengths and weaknesses for delivering information most effectively.
• Determine which medium is best suited for different communication goals.
Measurement: The two performance indicators will be through a portfolio representing different forms of media accompanied by evaluation of the media.

4. Develop the skills to create multimedia stories that can be integrated into a website on a given topic.
Performance Indicators
• Develop a finished story (or stories) using multimedia technology.
Measurement: This performance indicator will be evaluated in a project.

5. Develop the skills to access information for multimedia stories and to create a microsite that integrates multimedia storytelling.
Performance Indicators
• Develop research skills to access information for multimedia stories.
• Develop a microsite that integrates information on a chosen topic with multimedia technology.
Measurement: Assessment through evaluation of a microsite. SACSCOC states that General Education must include at least one course from each of the following areas:
- humanities/fine arts
- social/behavioral sciences
- natural science/mathematics
The courses do not narrowly focus on those skills, techniques, and procedures specific to a particular occupation or profession General Education
Core Competencies Gen Ed is a substantial component of each undergraduate degree
- ensures breadth of knowledge
- is based on a coherent rationale
Constitutes a minimum of 30 semester hours or the equivalent General Education
Core Competencies General Education Student Learning Outcomes
At the completion of core studies the student will be able to:

Mathematical Reasoning (1 course)
1. Evaluate the effectiveness of the mathematical sciences in describing the world.

2. Analyze quantitative information symbolically, graphically, numerically, and verbally for the purpose of solving problems or drawing conclusions.

3. Construct logical arguments in support of mathematical assertions.

Science and Nature (1 course)
1. Demonstrate knowledge of major concepts, tools and methodologies in one of the natural sciences.

2. Understand processes, limitations and ethics of scientific inquiry.

3. Use scientific inquiry to solve problems and evaluate information.

Individual and Social Behavior (1 course)
1. Understand central concepts, theories, and methods used to explain individual and social behavior in one of the social and cultural disciplines.

2. Use knowledge of social scientific methods to analyze examples of individual and social behavior.

3. Evaluate the applicability of social scientific knowledge for understanding individual and social behavior in particular contexts.

Histories of Cultures and Societies (1 course)
1. Demonstrate an understanding of the discipline of history, in particular the application of historical methodologies in the formulation of plausible interpretations of human behavior in past centuries.

2. Demonstrate an understanding of how societies develop over centuries through the complex interaction of socio-economic, political, religious, and other cultural forces including historical memories constructed by successive generations.

3. Demonstrate an understanding of continuities and differences between the past and the present. Based upon mission and values of the university
Determined by the faculty and administration Institutional
Core Competencies Drawn from MU Each graduate program should have its discipline specific GSLOs
But graduate education doesn’t have general education courses or a core curriculum
- Therefore is it possible to have GRADUATE CORE LEARNING OUTCOMES?
- Are there outcomes that are common across all graduate programs at a university? Graduate Core Competencies Communicate the history of the discipline
Demonstrate a mastery of the theory that underlies the foundation of the discipline
Demonstrate a mastery of the methodology and techniques specific to the discipline
Demonstrate proficiency in oral and written communication within the field of study
Demonstrate a mastery of research, scholarship, and critical evaluation within the field of study
Demonstrate creative or innovative activity within the field of study
Function as a professional and a steward of the discipline
Demonstrate a mastery of professional ethics and/or research ethics Possible Graduate CORE Learning
Outcomes Analysis is of the student learning and not the faculty
Departmental Committee examines completed rubrics from across courses to identify trends both positive and negative
Weaknesses are identified for each course
Weaknesses are identified for the curricula within the department Analysis Provides in writing various clear and explicit criteria for evaluation of student work
Changes professional judgment into numerical ratings on a scale
Allows comparison among various faculty across courses Use of a Rubric
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