Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

Writing a Conclusion --

No description
by

Jennifer Hynes

on 2 January 2015

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Writing a Conclusion --

Summarize your essay
A good conclusion may simply list the main points you've covered in the essay. It can even return to the points you covered in the introduction, but phrasing the ideas a bit differently.

But avoid phrases like, "In conclusion" or "As I have shown."
Writing a Conclusion --
Set your Ideas Free

Offer additional ideas
You may bring up a new bit of information that wasn't part of your main discussion, like suggesting other reasons a change should occur. But be sure you don't open up a whole new can of worms -- keep it simple.

Besides these reasons to make the city easier to navigate by bike, encouraging bicycle commuting will help citizens get the exercise they need to stay fit and healthy.
Look to the future
You can speculate about what benefits might come from the change you want to see. You can even urge your readers to take action.

Your family's choices can help reduce the amount of electronic waste that clogs our landfills and poisons our drinking water.
Get help from others
End with a quote.
Finishing with that perfect quotation from a source can make sure your readers leave in the right state of mind. But if you started your essay with a quote, don't include another quote at the very end.

Tell a story.
You can also strengthen your case by telling a story that proves your point -- either your own story or someone else's.
Ask a question
If you leave readers pondering the answer to your question, you've made an impact -- you have their attention.

Is your child really benefiting from the time and money spent honing a tee shot or perfecting a backwards handspring? Would more attention to math or science benefit his or her future?
An essay's conclusion has an important job to do.
You may think you are done writing once the body paragraphs are complete. But a strong conclusion is important. Otherwise, your readers may feel they are stepping off a cliff after your final paragraph, with no sign of "the end."

Try one of these methods to end strong.
Jennifer Hynes, Ph.D.
Full transcript