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Use of Gamification in an Adult Learning Setting

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Dennis Greene

on 19 June 2016

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Transcript of Use of Gamification in an Adult Learning Setting

gāmife'kāSHen/
noun
the application of typical elements of game playing (e.g., point scoring, competition with others, rules of play) to other areas of activity, namely marketing and education
Question:
Do principles of gamification have a negative or positive impact on adult learners in an education setting?
Research Problem
Proposed Solution
Avoid use of gamification principles with adult learners in an education setting

Research reviewed provides evidence that:
based on empirically proven experimentation (Hanus & Fox, 2013, and Dominguez, et. al, 2013) vs hypothetical data (Pappas, 2015), gamification lowers motivation and long term performance
qualitative data obtained through experiments gives initial evidence that in practice, adults do not prefer gamification
gamified classrooms result in decreased learning
Next Steps
I propose additional research be conducted to determine whether gamification would positively impact an adult learner based on:
-Age
-Instructional Setting
Research Findings
Dennis Greene
Walden University
EDUC - 6125 Dr. Hazari

Use of Gamification in an Adult Learning Setting
Gamification
References:
Biro, G. I. (2013). Didactics 2.0: A pedagogical analysis of gamification theory from a comparative perspective with a special view to the components of learning. Procedia - Social and Behavioral Sciences, 141, 148-151. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.sbspro.2014.05.027

Dale, S. (2014). Gamification: Making work fun, or making fun of work? Business information Review, 31 (2), 82-90. doi: 10.1177/0266382114538350

Dominguez, A., Saenz-de-Navarrete, J., de-Marcos, L., Fernandez-Sanz, L., Pages, C., Martinez-Herraiz, J. Gamifying learning experiences: Practical implications and outcomes. Computers & Education, 63, 380-392. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.compedu.2012.12.020

Hanus, M., Fox, J. (2015). Assessing the effects of gamification in the classroom: A longitudinal study on intrinsic motivation, social comparison, satisfaction, effort, and academic performance. Computers & Education, 80, 152-161. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.compedu.2014.08.019

Pappas, C. (2015). Top gamification statistics and facts for 2015. Retrieved from https://elearningindustry.com/top-gamification-statistics-and-facts-for-2015

Background
1980's
- Principles of gamification first appeared in academic papers discussing the "gamification" of learning.

1990's
- Principles of gamification appeared in educational games being introduced by newly developed technology.

2000's
- Term "gamification" was coined by Nick Pelling. The first gamification consulting firm was founded. The first modern gamification platform was offered as a way for organizations to create gamified processes using pre-made elements.

2010's
- Gamification becomes popular due to increased access to internet. The Oxford dictionary adds "gamification" to its word of the year short list. Coursera launches a gamification course that attracts 80,000 students. Research predicts that 80 per cent of gamified applications will fail due to poor design. Biro suggests that gamification should be considered among the learning theories.

Impact on Motivation
Decreased intrinsic motivation (Hanus & Fox, 2013)
Increased superficial extrinsic motivation (Dominguez, et. al, 2013)
62% of 100 learners indicated that gamification would increase motivation (Pappas, 2015)
Impact on Performance & Retention
Lower final exam scores in gamified classroom (Hanus & Fox, 2013)
Significantly lowered scores on final exam and participation scores than non gamified class (Dominguez, et. al, 2013)
Impact on Satisfaction
82% of 100 learners indicated that they would be in favor of gamified learning environments (Pappas, 2015)
Learners did not prefer a gamified class because they did not have time for the games and they did not want to compete publicly for points (Dominguez, et. al, 2013)
Dale, S. (2014). Gamification: Making work fun, or making fun of work? Business information Review, 31 (2), 82-90. doi: 10.1177/0266382114538350

Biro, G. I. (2013). Didactics 2.0: A pedagogical analysis of gamification theory from a comparative perspective with a special view to the components of learning. Procedia - Social and Behavioral Sciences, 141, 148-151. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.sbspro.2014.05.027
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