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Body-Snatching and Mary Shelley's Frankenstein

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Macy Michele

on 29 January 2015

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Transcript of Body-Snatching and Mary Shelley's Frankenstein

Burke and Hare
Burke and Hare were two Scottish men who committed a series of sixteen murders for the purpose of scientific dissection in the early 18th century. Shelley, living in neighboring Switzerland, most likely was aware of these events or at least events similar to that of Burke and Hare, as is stated in the essay, "Man Made Monster' by Daniel Cohen, "The most notorious of these murders were Burke and Hare, who operated in Edinburgh, Scotland, at about the same time that Frankenstein was written. The practice was fairly common throughout Europe..." () Like these body-snatchers, Victor Frankenstein stole the bodies of the deceased to create his monster himself, so the influence of this time period can very clearly be seen in Shelley's writing.
Vivisection

History of Body-Snatching
How did the idea of Body Snatching affect the writing of Frankenstein?
Body-Snatching and Mary Shelley's Frankenstein
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