Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

Figurative Language

No description
by

Pavel Pi

on 16 October 2015

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Figurative Language

Metaphor
Extended Metaphor
A metaphor that continues throughout several lines or sentences.
Figurative Language
By
Josue A.
Pavel P.
Period 1

Honors English Period 1
Pavel Pilat
Josue Alvarado
Literal
Language
Words used by their dictinoary definition; means excatly what it says.
vs.
Figurative
Language
Words used in a creative way, usually used to compare two unlike things
Compares two unlike things by saying one thing is the other, without using
like
or
as.
Simile
Compares two unlike things using
like
or
as
Gives human qualities to something that is not human.

Exaggeration
To describe something larger/better or smaller/worse than it really is.
Examples:
The sun is a golden ball
His heart is a cold stone.
Examples:
Examples:
Examples:
His face was as white as snow.
He was as tall as a tree.
The flag at the top of the pole waved at us.
The ball smacked my face when we were playing soccer.
His head is bigger than a watermelon
My cat is fatter than a hippo
Example:
"The cafeteria is a jungle.
Wild animals scrambling for food.
Grunting
like wild boars
Stampeding
to the line
Devouring
their prey
Cleaning
their paws
and then returning to their dens."
- By: Alex Foster, Maura Grasshoff, Bridget Bradley, and Christa Michel
In this poem, the authors describe the cafeteria as a place with wild animals. There is no order, people come for what they want, and then soon return back to their classes.
Full transcript