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Swaziland & Japan Population Pyramid Analysis

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navid de leede

on 5 April 2013

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Transcript of Swaziland & Japan Population Pyramid Analysis

Navid de Leede
Noah Barrengos Comparing and Contrasting
of
Japan & Swaziland
Population Pyramid Graphs Swaziland Population Pyramid Japan Population Pyramid Comparing and Contrasting Swaziland Graph Analysis In Swaziland there is a large population of young children but as age progresses the population decreases; this illustrates the short life expectancy of many adults and is customary to observe in a developing nation. Swaziland specifically has one of the highest rates of HIV/Aids infection at 26.1% of all adults in 2010. Over 50% of adults in there 20s are infected and this is where the population visibly drops. Poverty and food shortages are widespread across Swaziland, creating numerous orphans that can only survive for so long in harsh conditions. The life expectancy dropped to 40 years old in 2010. Japan Graph Analysis Japan is considered a developed country; its populations life expectancy is exceptionally high and its woman led the world in life expectancy during 2007. They have less young but the population consists of many 35-40 year olds and 60-65 year olds. This is the result of two separately occurring “baby booms”. Many believed that the Japanese had such a high life expectancy because their traditional rice and fish based diet was very nutritious. Demographers expect this life expectancy to drop soon with the introduction of a new diet that mainly contains hamburgers, instant noodles, and other “junk” foods. In Swaziland there is a large population of young children but as age progresses the population decreases; this illustrates the short life expectancy of many adults and is customary to see in a developing nation, Japan on the other hand has a relatively low population of young and many middle aged and older residents. In the area nearing the center of the Japanese graph there appears to be a dent (near the age 50 mark) that is the result of the occurrence of world war two. The population was slightly reduced but if not for this exception Japan’s residents live very long. Because Japan is considered developed poverty is not as widespread as it is in Swaziland. In japan 16% of the population is under the poverty line while in Swaziland 69% of the population is under the poverty line. This is clearly illustrated in the graphs because near age 40, the population of Japan is still progressing strongly while the population of the Swazis begins to dwindle. Comparing and Contrasting
Continued The japanese also have medical options and education, they can choose healthier options and go to a doctor if something is wrong, because their is so little money in Swaziland, this is not always an option for them. Swaziland is also disease ridden, the country has one of the highest rates of HIV/Aids infection at 26.1% of all adults in 2010. Over 50% of adults in there 20s are infected and this is where the population visibly drops. Because of this prevalent disease combined with the inability to access medical care, it is clear why the two nations have such contrasting population pyramids. Japan has already undergone a demographic transition and it now produces relatively few young but sustains a high life expectancy, Swaziland has not yet undergone this transition and it’s many younger residents do not always live as long as they should.
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